AUTHOR VISIT

THE GIFT OF FAILURE

How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed

Thursday, April 5th at 7:00 p.m.

A Presentation by Jessica Lahey, New York Times Bestselling Author

Congressional School in partnership with MONA (Mothers of North Arlington) is pleased welcome author, Jessica Lahey to talk about her New York Times bestselling book, The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed.  The event is free and open to the community.  A book signing will take place after the presentation, and copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Congressional School

3229 Sleepy Hollow Road
Falls Church, VA 22042
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MONA
J-LAHEY

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jessica Lahey is an educator, writer, and speaker. She is an English and writing teacher, a correspondent for the Atlantic, commentator for Vermont Public Radio, and writes the "Parent-Teacher Conference" column for the New York Times. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed. Jessica earned a B.A. in Comparative Literature from the University of Massachusetts and a J.D. with a concentration in juvenile and education law from the University of North Carolina School of Law. She lives in New Hampshire with her husband and two sons.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Modern parenting is defined by an unprecedented level of overprotectiveness: parents who rush to school at the whim of a phone call to deliver forgotten assignments, who challenge teachers on report card disappointments, mastermind children’s friendships, and interfere on the playing field. As teacher and writer Jessica Lahey explains, even though these parents see themselves as being highly responsive to their children’s well being, they aren’t giving them the chance to experience failure—or the opportunity to learn to solve their own problems.

Overparenting has the potential to ruin a child’s confidence and undermine their education, Lahey reminds us. Teachers don’t just teach reading, writing, and arithmetic. They teach responsibility, organization, manners, restraint, and foresight—important life skills children carry with them long after they leave the classroom.

Providing a path toward solutions, Lahey lays out a blueprint with targeted advice for handling homework, report cards, social dynamics, and sports. Most importantly, she sets forth a plan to help parents learn to step back and embrace their children’s failures. Hard-hitting yet warm and wise, The Gift of Failure is essential reading for parents, educators, and psychologists nationwide who want to help children succeed.

 

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