Curriculum

We are proud of our strong record of academic excellence and continued commitment to best practice approaches to teaching young learners. Our academic day begins at 8:10 a.m. and ends at 3:15 p.m.

In Early Childhood, students are introduced to the fundamentals of learning which are building blocks for a more focused foundation of literacy skills, emerging mathematics, and hands-on science.

In Kindergarten, students work on mastering literacy skills, and are introduced to Singapore Math concepts. They also receive instruction with specialty teachers in art, music, and physical education, and French or Spanish.

Reading and writing skill development and mathematical skill development are at the core of the educational experience for students in Grades 1-4. Specialty instruction in physical education, art, music, French or Spanish continue through these grades.

In Middle School (Grades 5-8) classes are divided into two sections for all academic and specialty classes. In addition to their core academic classes, Middle School students receive instruction in art, music, speech & drama, physical education, science, and Spanish, French or Latin.

Preschool

Young children have the greatest capacity for learning. Congressional’s Preschool program provides our students with just. Through hands on exploration and discovery, we delight in sharing in the child’s learning experience. Academic opportunities are presented throughout our day. Our curriculum is integrated across content areas and lessons are presented in engaging and exciting ways.  We recognize each child as an individual and focus our attention on educating the whole child. Through differentiated instruction, each child’s talents are recognized and celebrated. We strive to enhance a child’s self-esteem and independence, while maintaining a nurturing and supportive environment.

Language Arts

Congressional Preschoolers approach language arts through a variety of methods. Through the use of interactive and diverse literary experiences and discussions, students develop a rich and expansive vocabulary and a deep appreciation of literature and storytelling. By focusing on developing a strong alphabetic and phonetic understanding, a solid foundation is put in place to ensure that all children have the opportunity to gain the necessary skills in preparation to become engaged and emergent readers. At Congressional, preschoolers are also introduced to early printing skills through the use of the Handwriting Without Tears Program.

  • Letter Recognition and application
  • Developing phonemic awareness and letter-sound relationships
  • Comprehension and participation in shared literature
  • Ability to tell and retell stories
  • Development and expansion of receptive and expressive language
  • Exploring rich and relevant vocabulary by providing experiences for application
  • Developing printing skills with the Handwriting Without Tears program
  • Express own ideas and stories through illustrations and beginning writing

Science

Congressional Preschoolers are introduced to the scientific method to help them engage in the world around them. They make simple observations, predictions and generalizations based on real life experiences. Our students are encouraged to use their senses to gather information about their surrounding environment. Preschool students collect, describe and record information through discussions, drawings and charts. We utilize our 40 acre campus as an outdoor classroom to foster a love and appreciation of nature. Topics of study include:

  • Earth science: seasons and weather
  • Environmental science: recycling and stewardship of our planet
  • Physical science: states of matter, cause and effect, simple machines
  • Life science: plants, animals, basic needs

Math

The Congressional Preschool program allows students to experience mathematical concepts through multisensory activities, independent exploration and guided learning. Students are able to connect real life experiences to the material being taught as they utilize math and number concepts throughout the school day in engaging and relevant ways.

  • Rote counting to 10
  • Recognition of print numbers 1-10
  • Number value 1-10
  • Comparison of numbers and groups
  • Use of relevant mathematic vocabulary
  • Explore geometric shapes
  • Matching, sorting and classifying
  • Patterning
  • Exploring weights and measures
  • Special awareness

Social Studies

The Preschool Social Studies program at Congressional is designed to create awareness of and celebrate the students’ personal cultures and community. Throughout their preschool year, students transition from singular awareness to cooperative interaction. By providing a variety of learning opportunities through literature, dramatic play and technology our students develop into caring, socially conscious and responsible individuals.

  • Awareness of physical attributes of self and others
  • Relationships among family and friends
  • Recognition of habitats and their features and locations
  • Awareness and celebration of diverse cultures and communities
  • Understand the relationship of ourselves, the members of the community and the roles that they play

Music

The music teacher meets with the Preschool students twice each week. The program exposes the children to musical concepts through:
Singing

  • Creative movement
  • Playing rhythm instruments
  • Participating in performances throughout the year

Spanish

In the Preschool, the class meets twice a week for for twenty minutes each class.the students are exposed to the Spanish language through:
Songs

  • Movement
  • Stories

Physical Education

Preschool is a time of growth in physical development. During PE class, the students will participate in a variety of activities that promote physical fitness and health.

Field Trips

At Congressional, our Preschool students go on two to three field trips during the spring. Field trips enhance the classroom experience in a meaningful way and provide the student with the opportunity to make concrete connections in their world.

Junior Kindergarten

At Congressional we celebrate the whole child. In Junior Kindergarten students are given multiple opportunities to grow and expand upon their preschool experience. We strive to ensure all students’ academic and social needs are met at their current level and challenged as the year progresses. We cultivate and encourage a strong collaborative atmosphere, in which students feel nurtured, secure, and free to learn from their experiences. We aim to create a well-rounded global citizen, who is empathetic and knowledgeable. We achieve these goals through discovery, exploration, and understanding each child’s valuable contribution within the classroom community.

Language Arts

The Congressional Junior Kindergarten language arts program is an expansion of the Preschool program, offering a dynamic environment in which students develop essential skills. During Junior Kindergarten, the students begin dictating their own stories and later work towards becoming independent writers. Congressional’s Junior Kindergarten utilizes the Scott Foresman reading series, as well as the Handwriting Without Tears writing program.  Engaging and inclusive group discussions enable children to make relevant contributions as they continue to develop a richer and more expansive vocabulary. Junior Kindergarten uses a variety of materials to develop their gross and fine motor abilities instrumental for beginning reading skills.

  • Identify and utilize upper and lower-case letters
  • Develop phonemic awareness
  • Acquire a solid understanding of concept of print
  • Cultivate a love and appreciation of literacy
  • Build comprehension skills

Science

Congressional’s Junior Kindergarten students utilizes the school’s forty-acre campus in order to allow students the opportunity to explore and discover the world around them. Each classroom is equipped with a science center and an array of materials to investigate and experiment with the concepts introduced. Bridging from preschool, we incorporate scientific method terminology and concepts into their daily happenings. Some topics covered in science include:

  • Seasons and weather
  • Magnets
  • Animals and insects
  • Plants
  • Habitats
  • Environmental science

Math

Congressional Junior Kindergarten students are given the opportunity to understand and distinguish between concrete and abstract concepts. Building on their preschool experience, Junior Kindergarteners continue to use a variety of materials to encourage and engage the students in a multisensory math experience. Additionally, students are introduced to Singapore Math terminology to prepare them for Kindergarten.

  • Patterning
  • Number recognition and writing 0-10 in random order
  • 1 to 1 correspondence
  • Sorting and sequencing
  • Counting by rote to 20
  • Measurement
  • Graphing
  • Beginning addition skills

Social Studies

Congressional ’s Junior Kindergarten students receive a multi-faceted approach to social studies. We begin with social emotional concepts and include the students’ family backgrounds in order to create personal connections.Throughout the year, the students are exposed to different geographical elements and historical events. These topics are interwoven into the daily curriculum to enrich their learning and provide them with a global perspective of the world in which we live. Topics in social studies include:

  • Family, home, and school connection
  • Native Americans
  • Holidays around the world
  • Medieval times and fairy tales
  • Historical figures

Music

Junior Kindergarten meets has music class two times per week. To supplement their music lessons the students perform in concerts throughout the school year. Junior Kindergarten students explore music through:

  • singing
  • playing
  • listening and moving

Spanish

In Junior Kindergarten Spanish class, students will learn basic classroom commands and greetings. They will listen to short stories with illustrations, and will use common vocabulary such as numbers, colors and basic greetings. The students will learn about the culture, traditions and holidays in the Spanish speaking world.  Class resources will include:

  • Books
  • Songs 
  • Games 
  • Multi-media

French

In Junior Kindergarten French class, students will focus on: greetings, colors and shapes, numbers (0-10), weather and some clothing, the days of the week, classroom commands, family, body, feelings, springtime nature, animals, food and drinks. They will also learn about the French holidays throughout the year following the French calendars. Class resources will include:

  • Books
  • Songs 
  • Games 
  • Multi-media

Physical Education

Junior Kindergarten continues to build upon the skills learned in Preschool. The children actively participate in a variety of movement activities throughout the year to continue to strengthen their gross motor development. The activities they engage in promote Congressional’s commitment to physical fitness and health. 

Field Trips

Congressional Junior Kindergarten students have the opportunity to go on several different types of field trips throughout the year. These field trips are engaging, enriching, hands-on learning experiences that enhance the curriculum. Past field trips have included: farmer’s markets, productions at the Smithsonian, and the National Zoo.

Kindergarten

Kindergarten is a time for great discovery. Our Kindergarteners are given opportunities to flex their natural curiosity, their growing muscles and their social capabilities all in a day’s work.Though part of Lower School, kindergarten is a transition between the Early Childhood Program and Lower School. Students work on mastering literacy skills; are introduced to Singapore Math concepts; and receive increased instruction with specialty teachers in art, music, physical education, and world language. At the same time, students spend time learning in centers and have plenty of time for play.

Language Arts

Language Arts is a centerpiece of the daily kindergarten curriculum.  As they enter kindergarten, children occupy a wide literacy spectrum with some small friends still mastering letter sounds and others beginning to consume chapter books. Through their small classes and small group instruction, teachers meet children where they are and support them as they reach for the next level of literacy accomplishment.  Whether they’re enjoying leveled readers on their own or listening to teachers read stories by authors such as Jack Ezra Keats, Eric Carle, Nancy Carlson, or Faith Ringold, Senior kindergartners are immersed in daily reading activities.  

Using the Writer’s Workshop approach, kindergartners are also expressing their thoughts and feelings on a variety of topics and beginning to craft stories using multiple sentences.  Congressional kindergartners use inventive spelling, relying on the letter sounds they hear to begin communicating their ideas on paper. Congressional kindergartners are also instructed in early handwriting using  “Handwriting Without Tears”, a program that is taught throughout Lower School and prepares students for cursive. Congressional kindergartners are working to master many concepts, some of which include:

  • Developing phonemic awareness and letter-sound relationships
  • Understanding spelling patterns
  • Participating in leveled reading
  • Understanding parts of speech
  • Comprehension strategies
  • The ability to tell and retell stories
  • Recognizing the roles of authors and illustrators
  • Crafting, editing and producing stories
  • Developing a vocabulary of high-frequency words
  • Developing printing skills using Handwriting Without Tears

Science

There is perhaps no greater point of curiosity on life’s learning curve than that of kindergarten.  So it is no wonder that kindergartners thrive in the natural laboratory that is kindergarten. Kindergartners use a variety of hands-on STEM-based activities and resources to go in depth on scientific topics.  Whether they’re making it rain in the classroom, measuring their body weight on other planets, or completing their own taste tests, there is no greater place to ask a question, make a good guess, observe carefully, and write down what you see.  Some of the topics covered in science include:

  • Weather and Seasons – identifying concepts and characteristics of the four seasons including typical weather
  • Human Body – understanding that major systems of the body and the characteristics and position of major organs of the body
  • Nutrition – identifying foods and classifying into food groups
  • Solar System – recognizing the characteristics of the sun including day and night
  • Dinosaurs – exploring the characteristics and history of the dinosaurs and classifying dinosaurs as herbivores, carnivores or omnivores

Math

Congressional Schools’ Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Children develop an appreciation for math, as a means of solving a problem.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach. At Congressional, parents and students are even invited to learn together during Math Meet-Ups, where families are invited to come in on select mornings to problem-solve alongside their children using the Singapore Math program.  

  • Numbers to 100
  • Addition & Subtraction 
  • Number Bonds as Part-Whole
  • Measurement
  • Money and Time  
  • Greater than Less Than

Social Studies

Kindergartners share equal enthusiasm for the community around them and the history that shaped them.  In kindergarten, children study figures from American History including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, the Pilgrims, and many famous African Americans like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Wilma Rudolph, and Barack Obama. They songs about Johnny Appleseed or listen to music by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, Senior kindergarten children are given regular occasions to appreciate the great the contributions from those individuals who continue to shape our nation.

If you happen to be visiting our campus in the Spring and need directions, ask a kindergartner and they can point you in the right direction.   Kindergartners get out and walk the Congressional grounds as they map the various structures, roads and landmarks all over our campus.  Social Studies topics covered include:

  • Community helpers – their roles in our society
  • Historical Figures – introduction to various figures from American History
  • Maps – understanding their significance and usefulness
  • Identifying continents and oceans

Music

Children in kindergarten attend a specialty music class twice a week where they learn to appreciate the joy of music and movement.  At this age, children are beginning to tune their bodies to the different beats and rhythms of the various kinds of music.  For some, it will mark their first time playing an instrument or learning to vocalize and sing as a part of a group. Kindergarten children also share their innate love of music through school-wide performances at International Day and the Spring Concert.  Children in kindergarten will also learn some of the following:

  • How to aurally repeat simple duple and triple rhythm patterns
  • To play rhythm patterns by clapping, drumming or using percussion instruments
  • How to aurally identify high and low sounds (major and minor tonalities)                                                                                 
  • To recognize instruments by sight and sound
  • To improvise movements to music or poetry

World Languages

Bienvenidos amigos! (Welcome friends!)  Venez apprendre avec nous!  (Come learn with us!)  Congressional Students can select 1 of 2 World Languages; Spanish or French. Both The students will strengthen their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using resources such as:

  • Books
  • Songs 
  • Games 
  • Multi-media

Physical Education

Children in Kindergarten will attend Physical Education class four days a week. Kindergarteners are embarking on a journey of formal physical education and a lifetime of movement. They are curious and eager to learn new skills. Some kindergarten students are kinesthetic learners who use their bodies to understand the world. The qualities of color, shape, texture, and space are important concepts for kindergarten students that should be taught in different subject areas. The concept of circle, for example, can be learned by writing, drawing, and through physical education activities that use circles. Physical Education enhances kindergarten students’ skills of learning through physical actives. The students will learn about:

  • Movement Concepts
  • Body Management
  • Locomotive Movement
  • Manipulative Skills
  • Rhythmic Skills

Field Trips

Field trips are an important component of the curriculum at Congressional that allow children to engage in their learning beyond the four walls of the classroom.  Children look forward to the opportunity to travel to destinations that bring concepts to life through demonstration, activity and hands-on experience. Children return to campus with experience that further extends their depth of appreciation on a range of topics.  In kindergarten, those topics include:

  • Pumpkin Patch
  • Air and Space Museum
  • Museum of Natural History
  • Nature Center

Art

Kindergartners attend a specialty art class twice a week to develop their own ability to create and appreciate art.  During their kindergarten year, our young artists create a portfolio of masterpieces that include their very own self-portraits.  Art is another setting in which to extend the learning that begins in their home base classrooms. In kindergarten, children use their discovery of primary and secondary colors to create a 3D healthy food color wheel that links directly to their study of nutrition. Consistent with their emerging literacy skills, children’s literature, read in art class, serves as inspiration for many of the creations our children will embark on during the year. Over the course of the year, children gain experience with many different artistic concepts including:

  • The identification of primary and secondary colors
  • Introduction to famous artists and identification of their work
  • Use of textures, lines, shapes and patterns
  • Learn to care for art materials
  • Introduction to a wide a variety of media and techniques including: tempera, watercolor, and Bio paints, graphite and colored pencils, markers, crayons, oil pastels, collage, and Model Magic.
  • Vocabulary relative to specific media, techniques, and subject matter

Library

There is perhaps no greater playground for the mind than the library. Through weekly visits to the library, Congressional students are given instruction to assist them in learning to navigate the world of information that is available to them. Our librarian carefully aligns units of instruction to those taught in classes so that children are able to extend their own learning through a vast collection of books.  In kindergarten, children focus on the following skills:

  • Learn the role of the librarian
  • Understand that library materials are available in various formats
  • Develop reading, listening and discussions skills
  • Identify the parts of a book
  • Understand the difference between fiction and non-fiction

 

Grade 1

First Grade represents a period of tremendous cognitive, social and emotional growth for young children.  Congressional Schools’ First Grade program mirrors the energy, excitement and enthusiasm of the typical first grade student through a rigorous and challenging academic program. Our first graders are given the room to question assumptions, to fully explore topics and to collaborate with their peers. Busy, fast-paced days that encompass academics, team-work, movement and creativity are all the motifs of the wonderful canvas that is first grade.

Language Arts

Language Arts is the cornerstone of the first grade classroom.  Our program follows approaches developed at Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University, the epicenter of cutting edge practices in the teaching of writing and reading.  Through the Writer’s Workshop method, children are provided daily lessons that ignite the writing process and encourage children to develop along their own individual journeys as writers.  The model for writing meets children where they are and allows for differentiation, particularly through their individual conferences with teachers where they are guided to edit, revise and “fancy up” their works.  As a class, children often will collaborate for shared writing exercises.  Children in first grade showcase select writing assignments during “Authors’ Celebrations,” where parents and guests are invited to visit First Grade classrooms and tour the various works proudly created by our young writers.  

Reader’s Workshop offers children the opportunity to explore various literary genres as well as dedicated author studies including writers such as; Mo Willems, Tomie dePaola, and Ezra Jack Keats.  Reader’s Workshop utilizes shared reading, read-alouds, and dramatic presentations to support children as they develop their comprehension and fluency in reading.  You may occasionally find our First Graders waxing poetic in our outdoor Amphitheater during a Poetry Slam, where they may be reading or acting out selected poems.  At any given time, our students may be found focusing on some of the following:

  • Identifying the elements of a story
  • Experimenting with various writing styles including: narrative, informational, and opinion
  • Making critical connections; text-to-text, text-to-self, and text-to-world
  • Spelling words related to curriculum and phonics rules, and according to each child’s level using the Words  Their Way program
  • Recognizing capitalization, punctuation, and appropriate end marks  

Science

Science allows first graders the opportunity to act on their natural curiosity.  First graders at Congressional are given numerous opportunities to put the scientific method in practice.  Whether they are planting seeds in our outdoor classroom to observe life cycles or visiting Tripp’s Run to learn about the water cycle and proper care for their environment, first graders are active scientists. 

Here, children are introduced to the special roles that they can play in preserving the world around them and to concepts like Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.  Our campus provides the perfect setting for children to appreciate their potential for positive impact on all aspects of the environment.  In the classroom and all over campus, first graders are learning skills such as:

  • How to examine materials, define attributes, and sort samples based on common attributes
  • The safe way to handle scientific equipment and materials
  • How to identify, classify, and report on living things
  • Research methods to discover animal habitats like wetlands

Math

Congressional Schools’ Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations. Children in first grade develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills while cultivating an appreciation for math. The result is children gain a strong depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach.  Some of the concepts covered during first grade include:

  • Numbers to 100 – developing a thorough number sense
  • Number Bonds -- dividing numbers into two parts in different ways
  • Addition and subtraction – relating facts to number bonds, utilizing counting on strategies
  • Measurement (including length and weight)
  • Currency – recognition of bills and coins, comparing sets of coins, evaluating price, and preparation of payment
  • Shapes – sorting and classifying 2D shapes, describing patterns using 1-2 attributes and fitting pieces to form a basic shape

Social Studies

Congressional is noted for being a culturally diverse community that celebrates traditions at home and around the world.  First graders at Congressional are introduced to the world around them through a study of maps, history, culture, economics, and geography focusing on the United States and on more distant settings like Africa and Italy.  Students delight in learning about Italian culture and accentuate that learning with a special unit on Tomie dePaola’s now classic children’s novel, Strega Nona. 

Through a study of communities, first graders learn how communities support the needs and wants of citizens and more about their place within their own community.  These lessons come to life in a trip to the National Building Museum to participate in the City by Design program, where children become urban planners for the day, designing their own cities. Topics covered include:

  • Maps– Communicating location and directions, recognizing basic map symbols
  • Characteristics of a good citizen
  • Communities Study—understanding urban, suburban, and rural attributes and the needs versus wants of citizens in a community 
  • Geography – understanding where something is located and why it is there

Music

First graders attend a specialty music class twice a week.  Whether they’re tuning into various rhythm patterns or learning to sing and vocalize as a group, they’re always focused on a range of skills that support their natural appreciation for the joy of music.   In addition to their musical instruction, students are given multiple opportunities throughout the year to perform at special events like International Day or the Winter Concert.  Children may also be members of the chorus during the Spring School Musical.  Some of the skills our first graders learn include:

  • Singing a repertoire of songs
  • Playing simple accompaniments on drums and other percussion instruments
  • Recognizing instruments by families
  • Creating duo, trio, and quartet ensembles

World Languages

Bienvenidos amigos! (Welcome Friends!)  (Come learn with us!)  Venez apprendre avec nous!  Congressional Students can select 1 of 2 World Languages; Spanish or French.  Both programs meet three times a week.  World Language programs expose children to culture and life including holidays, food, songs and games. First grade marks the beginning of regular language conversation between students.

There is an emphasis on learning through context, supporting language acquisition through real-life experiences. First graders expand their prior vocabulary to include words related to community helpers, pets, inside and outside the home, polite expressions, basic commands, classroom directions, and cultural celebrations.  In addition, both programs focus on vocabulary that aligns with thematic units taught to first graders.  World Language students learn some of the following:       

  • Reviewing greetings and salutations
  • Calendar 
  • Using simple language patterns 
  • Using correct pronunciation in songs and games 
  • Recognizing vocabulary words in context

Physical Education

Children in First Grade will attend Physical Education class four days a week. Many first graders can demonstrate the proper form for jumping, hopping, galloping, sliding, walking, running, leaping, and skipping. Additional practice opportunities and instruction should be provided for children who are experiencing difficulties with these skills. First graders are genuinely excited about learning in physical education. They anticipate the excitement and fun associated with moving and learning. The Physical Education teachers will harness this energy and enthusiasm and channel it to help our first grader’s develop skills and build a solid movement foundation. Students will learn how to utilize knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and strategies that apply to the learning and performance of physical activity.

  • Concepts covered include:
  • Movement
  • Body Management
  • Locomotive Skills
  • Manipulative Skills
  • Rhythmic Skills
  • Fitness Knowledge
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Self-Responsibility

Field Trips

Field trips are an important component of the curriculum at Congressional that allow children to engage in their learning beyond the four walls of the classroom.  Children look forward to the opportunity to travel to destinations that bring concepts to life through demonstration, activity and hands-on experience. Children return to campus with experience that further extends their depth of appreciation on a range of topics.  

In first grade, trips may include the following:

  • National Building Museum – City by Design
  • George Mason University Theater
  • Hidden Pond Nature Center
  • Discovery Theater Performances

Art

First graders attend specialty art classes twice a week at Congressional.  Refining the skills begun in Kindergarten, students in first grade can also be found using earthenware clay, painting, creating tapestry weavings or making art inspired by stories and poetry from their reading.  As they navigate their Social Studies unit on Africa, our young artists continue to investigate patterns and create a paper Kente cloth, which originates in Ghana.  Margaret Musgrove’s “The Spider Weaver” sets the stage for this artistic exploration of African culture.  First grade artwork can be found on display throughout the school year and during Fine Arts Week, held every spring.   Some of the skills our first graders learn include:

  • Identifying primary & secondary colors, warm and cool colors 
  • Learning to care for art materials
  • Understanding line varieties
  • Mixing secondary paint colors
  • Understanding texture, both visual and tactile
  • Identifying shapes including geometric and organic
  • Understanding patterns; alternating and repeating
  • Using real and imaginary sources of inspiration
  • Using vocabulary relative to specific media, techniques, and subject matter

Library

There is perhaps no greater playground for the mind than the library.  Through weekly visits to the library, Congressional students are given instruction to assist them in learning to navigate the world of information that is available to them. Our librarian carefully aligns units of instruction to those taught in classes so that children are able to extend their own learning through a vast collection of books.  In first grade, children focus on the following skills:

  • Choosing independent reading books that are appropriate to their reading level
  • Recognizing and appreciating award-winning books such as Caldecott and Newbery Medal books
  • Understanding what it means to be a good digital citizen
  • Understanding how the library is organized 
  • Locating and using the online catalog for basic searching
Grade 2

Second Grade is a time where children’s interest and enthusiasm is rivaled only by their growing confidence as students.  The ability to read, write, study and think critically about the world around them is what engages second graders to be their best selves.  Whether their interests lie in reading, writing, math, science or all of the above, the second grade program is designed to challenge the students while also stretching their young minds.  Through a carefully crafted program that emphasizes strong academics, students in 2nd grade reach their highest potential.

Language Arts
Second graders receive instruction on reading and writing using the Readers’ and Writer’s Workshop approach developed at Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University.  Second graders expand their writing skills through personal narratives, opinion writing, poetry, research reports and story writing.  Building on the strong foundation from first grade, second graders are now writing material that includes multiple paragraphs and greater detail including elements like dialogue.   Second grade writing is featured throughout the classrooms and hallways of Congressional.  In fact, visitors to our Lower School Library may discover works, penned by our very own second grade authors.  

Still refining their reading and comprehension skills in particular, second graders are exposed to multiple genres including nonfiction, fiction, poetry and biographies.  Second graders are taught the value of thinking and reading critically, documenting their thinking using Stop and Jots; sticky note thoughts that cover their books like confetti.  Children enjoy class novels that may include; The Boxcar Children, Ramona Quimby Age 8, Charlotte’s Web and Stuart Little.  Second grade teachers also continue read-alouds for students to enjoy a shared reading experience.  Parents regularly read to children, encouraging and fostering a love for reading.   Congressional second graders are actively involved in student-centered discussions on books and literature and enjoy their very own book clubs, where they focus on novels designed for their specific reading level or based on a student’s particular interest area.  Students in second grade also focus on the following:
  • Reading aloud for expression
  • Writing directions and friendly letters 
  • Researching and writing multiple paragraph reports
  • Making class presentations
  • Identifying different types of sentences and understanding their subjects and predicates
  • Identifying  parts of a sentence including nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and possessive nouns
  • Reinforcing story elements and comprehension skills such as main idea, cause/effect, inference, fact/opinion, author’s purpose, figurative language, predictions, and summarizing
  • Applying complex phonics rules through spelling using Words Their Way programg

Math

Congressional Schools’ Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Children develop an appreciation for math, as a means of solving a problem.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach. 

Moreover, second grade children are beginning to develop an appreciation for the application of math to other areas of their work.  In fact, one favorite activity among second graders is the One Grain of Rice Counting activity based off the Mathematical Folktale, One Grain of Rice by Demi.  Through this clever exploration of exponential growth, children proudly discover their amazing mental math ability to count well beyond the tens, hundreds and thousands all the way to a million. 

In second grade there is a strong emphasis on mental math using strategies such as part-whole, number bonds, and an introduction to bar modeling.   

Some of the concepts covered during second grade include:
  • Place value with numbers to 1,000
  • Length in Metric and Standard Units
  • Money – counting and naming, adding and subtracting
  • Addition and subtraction of three-digit numbers
  • Geometry of flat and curved shapes
  • Telling time
  • Interpreting and comparing fractions
  • Multiplication and Division  of 2’s, 3’s, 4’s, 5’s and 10’s

Science

Second grade is home to budding scientists, eager for the opportunity to dig deeper into topics that pique their innate curiosity.  Our second graders use hands-on activities, technology and the natural landscape of the Congressional grounds to extend their study of science topics.  Visit our campus and you may stumble on a second grade class enjoying a nature walk where they unearth the components of an ecosystem, or identify particular plant adaptations.  In their review of plant and animal life cycles, second grade children raise butterflies, document changes, and create realistic scientific sketches to capture their observations, before releasing them to the world.   

During second grade, students will also study habitats and ecosystems, energy pyramids, food chains, renewable and non-renewable resources, and endangered species.  These topics invite multiple project opportunities to work in teams, conduct research, summarize their findings, and report back to other classmates to share what each team has learned.  If you’re interested in learning more about the Wetlands, Photosynthesis, Plant Adaptations or the Giant Panda, chances are that there is a resident expert in second grade to answer your questions. 

During second grade science, children will... 
  • Explore the interactions between plants, animals, humans, and the environment
  • Study the process of photosynthesis and pollination
  • Understand renewable and nonrenewable resources and approaches to conservation
  • Investigate the properties of matter and changes in states of matter
  • Understand different types of energy – light, sound, heat, electricity
  • Be introduced to Simple Machines – lever, inclined plane, wheel/axle, screw, pulley, and wedge

Social Studies

Second graders take a big step forward when they take a big leap back in time to study Ancient Civilizations.  The study of Ancient China, Egypt, Greece and Rome takes children on an exploration of the beliefs, traditions, symbols, and figures and the way these early civilizations helped to shape the world we know today.  Children conduct their own research, integrating the findings from their primary and secondary sources.  Second graders develop many skills including some of the following:
  • How to locate, gather and process information from multiple sources
  • General map skills
  • How to make and record observations about the physical and human characteristics of places

Music

Second graders attend a specialty music class twice a week.  Whether they’re learning and studying composers or learning to play simple melodies on the keyboard, they’re always focused on a range of skills that support their natural appreciation for the joy of music.  In addition to their musical instruction, students are given multiple opportunities throughout the year to perform at special events like International Day or the Winter Concert.  Children may also be members of the chorus during the annual school musical.  Some of the skills our second graders learn include:
  • Singing a repertoire of songs found in American and other cultures
  • Identifying notated rhythmic patterns that move faster, slower
  • Applying knowledge of written music to repertoire of music
  • Playing on percussion instruments to accompany musical selections 

World Language

Bienvenidos amigos! (Welcome friends!)   Venez apprendre avec nous!  (Come learn with us!)  Congressional Students can select 1 of 2 World Languages; Spanish or French.  Both programs meet three times a week.  World Language programs expose children to culture and life including holidays, food, traditions, songs and games.  Second grade also marks the beginning of daily language conversation between students.

There is an emphasis on learning through context, supporting language acquisition through real-life experience. Second graders expand their prior vocabulary to include words related to some of the following; hobbies, seasonal sports, food and drink, numbers to sixty, expressions of courtesy and emotions.  In addition, both programs focus on vocabulary that aligns with thematic units taught to second graders.  Second graders will also focus on some of the following:
  • Simple introduction to regular and irregular verb conjugation
  • Daily conversations using all the vocabulary learned in class.
  • Emphasis on pronunciation
  • Guided writing activities including seasonal clothing, animals and families
  • Recognizing vocabulary words in context through singing songs, reading books and guided writing activities
  • Using language patterns in response to songs and games

Art

Second graders attend specialty art classes twice a week at Congressional.  Consistent throughout our art curriculum is the belief that art be a source of joy and the process of creating art supersedes the product.  Art is another setting in which to extend the learning that begins in their home base classrooms.  The study of ancient civilizations extends to the art studio, where second graders create artwork based on their studies of Ancient Egypt and Greece.  hieroglyphic writing, an Egyptian Sarcophagus or a Greek Temple are but a few of the projects you’ll see displayed by second grade artists.  As they continue to develop their writing skills, they pen their own original “monster” stories that serve as the foundation for the “Pillow Monsters” they create in art class. 

Here, as it is across the curriculum students are focused on collaboration, expression and problem solving.  Students are encouraged to leverage the unanticipated “mistakes” that occur through the art process.  Second grade artwork can be found on display throughout the school year and during Fine Arts Week, held every spring.   Some of the skills our second graders learn include:
  • Creating clay pieces using slabs and pinch pots
  • Using natural objects in creating art
  • Using rulers to measure and as a straight edge
  • Recognizing Greek Architectural features including columns, pediments, friezes, and plinths
  • Using sewing, drawing, painting and modeling materials
  • Creating artwork using symmetry
  • Using vocabulary relative to specific media, techniques, and subject matter

Physical Education

Children in second grade will attend Physical Education class four days a week. Second graders continue to maintain a high level of flexibility and a moderate but steady growth in muscular strength and endurance. They exhibit relatively high heart and breathing rates and are typically active intermittently, showing vigorous bursts of energy followed by periods of rest or recovery (Siedentop 2004). Locomotor and manipulative skills continue to improve, and students demonstrate a keen interest in practicing activities that they know how to perform. Static and dynamic balance skills also show steady improvement, and rhythmic skills show an increase in quality and complexity of movement. Second graders want to know how things work, including their own bodies. Second grade is the time when children begin working cooperatively with a partner, although they are still eager for adult approval and find criticism difficult to handle. Through social interactions with other students, children begin to develop a sense of pride in their accomplishments and abilities. These interactions also provide opportunities for helping students accept and respect differences in others. Second graders are capable of exhibiting greater control over their emotions.  Concepts covered include:
  • Personal responsibility and feedback 
  • Rules and safety 
  • Movement concepts
  •  Muscular Strength/Endurance 
  • Flexibility 
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Manipulative skills 
  • Fitness knowledge
  • Self-Responsibility
  • Social Interaction
  • Group Dynamics

Library

There is perhaps no greater playground for the mind than the library.  Through weekly visits to the library, Congressional students are given instruction to assist them in learning to navigate the world of information that is available to them. Our librarian carefully aligns units of instruction to those taught in classes so that children are able to extend their own learning through a vast collection of books.  In second grade, children focus on the following skills:
  • Understanding the basics of the Dewey Decimal system and use it to locate a book
  • Independently using the online catalog
  • Learning about different fiction genres
  • Listening actively and critically for information and problem solving
  • Understanding basic reference sources
  • Learning to evaluate and compare information from multiple sources

Field Trips

Field trips are an important component of the curriculum at Congressional that allow children to engage in their learning beyond the four walls of their classroom. Children look forward to the opportunity to travel to destinations that bring concepts to life through demonstration, activity and hands-on experience. Children return to campus with experience that further extends their depth of appreciation of a range of topics.  In second grade, trips may include the following:
  • Mount Vernon
  • George Mason Center of the Arts – Theater Performance
  • DC Monument Tour
  • U.S. Bureau of Engraving
  • U.S.  Botanic Gardens
  • National Zoo
  • National Geographic Museum
Grade 3

Third Grade at Congressional is an adventure; ripe with rich learning opportunities and activities to continuously engage third grader’s intellectual curiosity.  Congressional third graders are highly motivated by their ability to work collaboratively with peers in the classroom.  Through a rigorous and challenging program, students in Third Grade continue to build a strong academic foundation that will prepare them for the 4th grade and beyond.

Language Arts

The third grade Language Arts curriculum includes reading, writing, spelling, and grammar instruction and is designed to stretch and challenge the students.   Third graders practice reading strategies using multiple genres and keep response notebooks that focus on various lessons such as story elements, connections, summarizing, character analysis, cause and effect, and tone.  In addition, third graders enjoy regular visits by parents and special friends who read to the children as a class.  

At this stage of their academic journey, children are more prolific with their writing portfolios, integrating the six traits of writing and better organizing their compositions with a clear beginning, middle, and end.  Children work together in leveled groups with the Words Their Way program to further develop their spelling skills. Vocabulary is closely aligned with the study of novels such as In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson, Frindle, Because of Winn Dixie,, and The Sign of the Beaver.  Students in third grade also focus on the following:
  • Listening for multiple details and drawing conclusions
  • Practicing reading strategies on multiple genres including fiction, folktales, fantasy, and informational text
  • Identifying and writing four types of sentences and compound sentences
  • Fluently using  adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and possessive nouns
  • Spelling with the Words their Way program
  • Identifying  parts of a sentence including nouns, verbs adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, and possessive nouns,

Math

Congressional’s Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Through a rigorous program that emphasizes critical thinking, children develop a number of skills and strategies to solve complex and often advanced mathematical problems.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach.  

In third grade there is an emphasis on strategies such as number patterns, rounding numbers, mental math strategies, sums and differences, estimation, and two-step word problems.

Some of the concepts covered during third grade include:
  • Numbers to 10,000
  • Money – addition and subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Conversion of units of measurement – length, width, capacity
  • Geometry, including area and perimeter
  • Time – hours, minutes, and elapsed time
  • Fractions
  • Multiplication and Division  by 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 100’s

Science

Third graders apply their scientific skills in the classroom and throughout the campus. Whether they’re building simple machines or observing chemical reactions during the Mysterious Powder unit, third graders are constantly using a hands-on approach to learning.   As they begin to learn more about human impact on the environment, our third graders will complete a stream monitoring program using beautiful Tripps Run which flows throughout the Congressional grounds.  Put on your waders and join your third grader as they collect and analyze water samples discovering life at its most miniscule.  During this extended investigation, soil scientists will visit third graders to demonstrate watersheds and soil sampling right here on Congressional Schools’ campus.

Ask a third grader to see his or her science notebook and you may see topics ranging from the solar system, to weather systems, or constellations. Science learning is accentuated through the use of technology.  In the classroom and all over campus, third graders are learning about:
  • Predicting and testing hypotheses
  • Comparing the physical features and phases of the moon
  • Reading weather maps, including identification and meaning of pressure systems and frontal boundaries
  • Understanding human impact on the environment
  • Identifying and creating simple machines
  • Understanding basic chemical reactions; acids and bases, and PH

Social Studies

Social Studies take third graders around the globe and closer to home as they delve into topics ranging from world geography to American History.  An in-depth study of the Native Americans culminates in a third grade tradition, Native American Fun Day, where third graders enjoy activities, celebrations, games and crafts unique to Native Americans.  Third graders also learn about the settlement of Jamestown and the original thirteen colonies, the Puritan Code of Laws and the significance of the Mayflower Compact.  Third grade children weave these newly discovered threads of history into the tapestry that makes up the great United States of America, as we know it today.

Children in third grade further the expertise developed in previous grade levels, using maps and globes as they study the world geography including continents, countries, and major bodies of water.  Exploring the 50 United States, or following the earliest routes of Ponce de Leon, John Cabot and Champlain, third graders are investigating our earliest origins and the connections between history and modern day America.  Third graders have the opportunity to study some of the following topics:
  • Exploring  World Geography including continents, countries, major bodies of water, and rivers as a source of civilization and trade
  • 50 United States – locating states within various regions and the unique attributes that distinguish each state
  • Learning about the vikings and explorers
  • Studying the earliest traces of man, the Inuit, the Plains, and other Southwest groups
  • Studying American history, geography, and economics beginning with the settling of Jamestown and the migration of Europeans to the United States

Music

Third graders attend a specialty music class twice a week.  Children in third grade are deepening their musical aptitude as they begin to sing with simple harmonies focusing on proper breath control and vocal technique.  During third grade they’re coached on how to respond accurately to musical terms such as dynamics and tempo markings. Musical direction is in place to support their natural appreciation for the joy of music.   Children may attend field trips such as children’s opera, dance, and puppet troupes to further support their appreciation for the role of music in various settings.  In addition to their musical instruction, students are given multiple opportunities throughout the year to perform at special events like International Day or the Winter Concert.  Children may also be members of the chorus during the annual school musical.  Some of the skills our third graders learn include:
  • Using movement to explore and understand tonal patterns and their relationship to one another
  • Exploring melodic patterns in and identify pitches played on soprano recorder
  • Advancing through the levels of the black belt recorder program
  • Playing selections from the World Music drumming curriculum
  • Identifying the direction of aural melodic patterns

World Languages

Bienvenidos amigos! (Welcome friends!)  Venez apprendre avec nous!  (Come learn with us!)  Congressional Students can select 1of 2 World Languages; Spanish or French.  Both programs meet three times a week.  World Language programs expose children to culture and life including holidays, food, traditions, songs and games.

There is an emphasis on learning through context, supporting language acquisition through real-life experience. At this stage in their world language experience, third graders are beginning to use creative writing activities to construct simple dialogue and questions and students in both programs are focusing more closely on the intonations of the spoken language.  Third graders will also focus on some of the following:
  • Continuing focus on regular and irregular verb conjugation
  • Increasing understanding of language patterns such as intonation, gender forms, and noun/adjective agreement
  • Daily conversations using all the vocabulary learned in class.
  • Emphasizing intonation and pronunciation
  • Recognizing vocabulary words in context through singing songs, reading books, and guided writing activities
  • Skyping with pen pals

Art

Third graders attend specialty art classes twice a week at Congressional.  Art is another setting in which to extend the learning that begins in their home base classrooms.  In third grade, children create artwork based on Native American artifacts to extend their appreciation of American history.  Art class is an opportunity to draw connections between history, culture, and visual art.  Here, as they are across the curriculum, students are focused on collaboration, expression, and problem solving.  Students are encouraged to generate innovative solutions as they approach their art activities.  Third grade artwork can be found on display throughout the school year and during Fine Arts Week, held every spring.   Some of the skills our third graders learn include:
  • Identifying tints, and shades of color, neutral colors, and color schemes
  • Identifying balance-symmetry, asymmetry, radial symmetry, and kaleidoscopic patterns
  • Mixing tints and shades
  • Maintaining a sketchbook for notes and preliminary drawings
  • Distinguishing between abstract, representational, and nonrepresentational art
  • Using vocabulary relative to specific media, techniques, and subject matter
  • Using coil and bas-relief carving skills in creating with clay
  • Working within a limited palette of colors

Physical Education

Children in third grade will attend Physical Education class four days a week. Third grade is a pivotal time in the development of students’ movement skills. Third graders who demonstrate and understand the proper form for locomotor and nonlocomotor skills now shift their focus to combining these skills into new movement sequences. They have developed a stronger sense of right and wrong, having reached the stage of development for internalization of rules and regulations. They are becoming more self-reliant and can work independently. This is a good time to have students create personal fitness and motor skill goals and monitor their own progress, because they have a strong desire for self-improvement. These students also experience an increased desire for interaction with others and should be provided with opportunities to practice and work toward common goals in pairs and triads.
 

Library

There is perhaps no greater playground for the mind than the library.  Through weekly visits to the library, Congressional students are given instruction to assist them in learning to navigate the world of information that is available to them. Our librarian carefully aligns units of instruction to those taught in classes so that children are able to extend their own learning through a vast collection of resources.  In third grade, children focus on the following skills:
  • Demonstrating an independent use of the online catalog and locate books with minimal assistance
  • Understanding which reference materials are appropriate for informational needs
  • Identifiying appropriate websites based on evaluative factors
  • Understanding the significance of copyright
  • Learning to write a simple bibliography

Field Trips

Field trips are an important component of the curriculum at Congressional that allow children to engage in learning beyond the four walls of their classroom.  Children look forward to the opportunity to travel to destinations that bring concepts to life through demonstration, activity and hands-on experience. Children return to campus with experience that further extends their depth of appreciation of a range of topics.  In third grade, trips may include the following:
  • National Museum of the American Indian
  • Corcoran Art Museum
  • Thomas Jefferson High School Planetarium 
  • Claude Moore Colonial Farm – farm skills exploration
  • Lyceum Museum – walking tour
Grade 4

Fourth Grade represents an intersection between the experiences and lessons of Lower School and the future that awaits them in grades 5 through 8.  Congressional Fourth Graders are eager and capable in their approach and are well-prepared for the high academic standards of Middle School.  Through a rigorous and challenging program that emphasizes independence and “ownership of learning”, students complete the foundation needed to move to Middle School.  By the end of 4th grade, students will be academically prepared to negotiate the rigors and expectations of Middle School academics.

Language Arts

The Fourth Grade Language Arts curriculum includes reading, writing, spelling, grammar, and handwriting instruction.  At this stage, there is a strong focus on narrative writing and applying the six traits writing program.  The art of writing in fourth grade continues to become more sophisticated. Through regular one-on-one conferences with their teacher and through their writing peer group, children are constantly engaged in writing exercises be they narratives, poetry, journal entries, or biographies. 

Fourth graders are also writing about texts to solidify their comprehension skills in reading as they consume multiple genres such as tall tales, realistic and historical fiction, poetry, and nonfiction.  Now, avid readers with a variety of strategies to approach challenging texts, children can be found participating in reading groups and actively extending their comprehension of works as they hold discussion groups and act out stories. In fourth grade, vocabulary is closely aligned with the study of class novels such as Shadow of a Bull, Island of the Blue Dolphins, Indigo and The Green Book among others.  Students in fourth grade also focus on the following:
  • Analyzing what is heard; predicting outcomes
  • Writing sentences with compound subjects and predicates
  • Identifying prepositions and prepositional phrases
  • Using adverbs, pronouns, possessive nouns, and adjectives
  • Writing with dialogue, introductory phrases, and interjections
  • Identifying context clues, discussing cause and effect, and visualization
  • Identifying and exploring themes in literature 

Math

Congressional’s Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Through a rigorous program that emphasizes critical thinking, children develop a number of skills and strategies to solve complex and often advanced mathematical problems.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach.  

In fourth grade there is an emphasis on strategies such as number patterns, rounding numbers, mental math strategies, sums and differences, estimation, and two-step word problems.

Some of the concepts covered during fourth grade include:
  • Place value to 100,000
  • Rounding numbers
  • Multiplication by a one and two-digit number, division by a one-digit number and 10
  • Mixed numbers and improper fractions
  • Presenting data in a table or graph
  • Measuring and drawing angles, perpendicular and parallel lines, area, and perimeter
  • Decimals; rounding, comparing, ordering, and the four operations
  • Solving word problems with various strategies

Science

Fourth graders investigate topics including the metric system, weather, matter, natural resources, and Earth’s history among others.  There is a careful application of STEM activities to support each of the scientific units including visits from Congressional parents to share their own work in STEM fields as well as a unique science cruise offered through the Living Classrooms Foundation. In fourth grade, students are becoming savvy in their ability to form a hypothesis and draw conclusions from their observations and they are actively preparing for their transition to the Middle School science program.

Science learning is accentuated through the use of technology such as iPads, United Streaming, and online research tools as well as unique relationships like that between Congressional Schools and the JASON project™.
 
In the classroom and all over campus, fourth graders are learning:
  • How to analyze and draw conclusions from data
  • How the scientific classification system works
  • How the water cycle works, including atmosphere, temperature, cloud types, air pressure, wind, and air masses
  • How to investigate adaptations through the process of evolution
  • Magnetism at the atomic level
  • How circuits work and how electricity is generated through electromagnetic induction
  • How to explore the physical and chemical properties of matter -- atoms and molecules, elements and compounds, mixtures and solutions, physical and chemical changes
  • The Earth’s structure, history, and geologic record
  • The rock cycle
  • The effects of erosion on Earth’s surface

Social Studies

“Historical knowledge is no more and no less than carefully and critically constructed collective memory. As such it can both make us wiser in our public choices and more richly human in our private lives.”-- American Historical Association

Fourth grade social studies is largely focused on U.S. History through the Reconstruction period.  Walk by a fourth grade classroom and you may overhear an enthusiastic discussion about independence and the role of government as they explore the social, political, economic, and cultural landscape of Virginia and the early United States.  Children explore important historical figures and themes through a creative learning process called notebooking.  By year’s end, each student will have their own treasured notebook filled with primary resources, maps, and foldables of their own making, and each will represent personal connections they have personally made to the content.  Indeed, a fourth grade Congressional classroom is a setting in which to share our nation’s collective memory, offering our students the wisdom they will need as citizens and humanity they will need to they make their way in the world.

Some of the topics covered in fourth grade social studies include:
  • Archaeology as a means of learning about the past
  • Exploration of economic growth – barter, debt, savings, credit
  • Economic goals of the first explorers and settlers and how tobacco served as an economic engine for Virginia’s economy
  • Understanding the French & Indian War, Revolutionary War, the Constitution
  • Civil War, underground railroad, slavery, states’ rights, Reconstruction and Jim Crow Laws

Music

Fourth graders attend a specialty music class twice a week.  In fourth grade, children are performing group songs using two-part harmonies, using percussion instruments, and are introduced to hand-bell playing for the first time.  In addition to their musical instruction, students are given multiple opportunities throughout the year to perform at special events like International Day or the Winter Concert.  Children in fourth grade are encouraged to participate in the school’s annual musical as members of either the chorus or the instrumental group.  In addition, Congressional fourth graders are invited to join the Congressional Orchestra and Band.  Some of the skills our fourth graders learn during music classes include: 
  • Identifying the function of the top number of a meter signature
  • Distinguishing between major and minor tonality, while learning chordal patterns
  • Accurately interpreting dynamic markings in performance settings
  • Distinguishing between stepwise and leapwise melodic patterns
  • Repeating and vocalizing beat patterns in double and triple time

World Languages

Bienvenidos amigos! (Welcome friends!) Venez apprendre avec nous!  (Come learn with us!)  Congressional students can select one of two World Languages; Spanish or French.  Both programs meet three times a week.  World Language programs expose children to culture and life including holidays, food, traditions, songs and games. Walk the halls of Congressional during the holiday season and you might take in the sweet smell of a Bûche de Noël or hear the sounds of holiday carols sung in Spanish.

There is an emphasis on learning through context, supporting language acquisition through real-life experience. At this stage in their world language experience, fourth graders are engaged in a number of different activities to help support their adoption of the language.  Activities may include; skits, weather reports, family trees, and Photo Story Projects.  Additionally, both programs focus on vocabulary that aligns with thematic units taught to fourth graders.  Fourth graders will also focus on some of the following:
  • Increased understanding of language patterns such as intonation, gender forms, noun/adjective agreement, and subject/pronoun agreement
  • Daily conversations using all the vocabulary learned in class
  • Emphasizing intonation and pronunciation
  • Writing pen pal letters
  • Creative guided writing activities
  • Recognizing vocabulary words in context through singing songs, reading books,g and guided writing activities
  • Skyping with pen pals

Art

Fourth graders attend specialty art classes twice a week at Congressional.  In fourth grade, art class is an opportunity to draw connections between history, culture, and visual art.  In fourth grade, artists also begin to appreciate the relationship between math and art as they explore the impact of diameter, radius, perimeter, and fractions on their artwork through a painting inspired by Islamic Tile Design.  Here, as it is across the curriculum, students are focused on collaboration, expression, and problem solving.  Students are encouraged to generate innovative solutions as they approach their art activities. 

As a passage to Middle School, fourth grade is where children begin to focus their attention on art as a part of their organic experience as individuals.  Students are supported as they identify opportunities for hands-on visual applications beyond the art studio.  As they near the Middle School years, students are beginning to make more artistic choices in-studio and are applying their own decision making.  They are less dependent on direction and more frequently seek instructors for their consultation.  Fourth grade artwork can be found on display throughout the school year and during Fine Arts Week, held every spring.  Some of the skills our fourth graders learn include:
  • Recognizing color characteristics; tint, tone, shade, and analogous colors
  • Creating artwork that uses themes, ideas, and art forms influenced by different regions of the world
  • Using various methods of clay hand building
  • Learning about and create linoleum block printmaking
  • Maintaining a sketchbook for notes, preliminary drawings, and drawing exercises
  • Using vocabulary relative to specific media, techniques, and subject matter

Physical Education

Children in fourth grade attend Physical Education class four days a week. Fourth-grade students are at a transitional stage between childhood and youth. There is still very little difference in motor skill performance between boys and girls, and there should be equal expectations for both in terms of physical performance. Eye–hand coordination is improving, fine-motor activities are becoming more skillful, and the greatest gain in strength begins at this stage. Students are also experiencing improvements in reaction time and balance, although the center of gravity is still located in the midsection of the body, making balance a challenge. The focus now shifts to using the proper form for manipulating (e.g., kicking, throwing, striking) objects. Fourth grade marks a period of increased curiosity and rapid mental growth.
 

Library

There is perhaps no greater playground for the mind than the library. Through weekly visits to the library, Congressional students are given instruction to assist them in learning to navigate the world of information that is available to them. Our librarian carefully aligns units of instruction to those taught in classes so that children are able to extend their own learning through a vast collection of resources.  In fourth grade, children focus on the following skills:
  • Understand how to effectively use a variety of search engines
  • Define a specific problem or task for research, investigation or discussion
  • Evaluate web pages and apply criteria to decide if site is good source of information
  • Identify and define a specific problem or task for research, investigation or discussion
  • Develop awareness that media messages are constructed with specific purpose

Field Trips

Field trips are an important component of the curriculum at Congressional that allow children to engage in their learning beyond the four walls of their classroom.  Children look forward to the opportunity to travel to destinations that bring concepts to life through demonstration, activity and hands-on experience. Children return to campus with experience that further extends their depth of appreciation of a range of topics.   In fourth grade, trips may include the following:
  • American Visionary Art Museum
  • Living Classroom Science Cruise
  • Local grocery stores – Mathematics Trip
  • Colonial Days at Gunston Hall
Grade 5

Fifth Grade marks the transition into Middle School at Congressional.  Beginning this year, students change classes throughout the day, working with specialist teachers who challenge and guide them. The curriculum in Middle School looks ahead to the student’s future academic needs, with a strong focus on preparing them intellectually, socially, and academically for the rigors of high school.

Language Arts

Fifth grade marks a significant expansion of students’ knowledge with respect to exploring words, ideas, genres, and expressive techniques through a range of reading and writing experiences. Walk into a fifth grade language arts classroom and you’re likely to find students engaged in group discussions, offering peer feedback, participating in student/teacher conferences, or deeply engrossed in writing or reading.

Through the workshop model of structured mini-lessons and individual conferences, students build strength as readers and writers in a variety of genres such as free verse poetry, odes, short stories, literary reflections, and expository essay. Students practice their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills, while also honing their understanding and use of English conventions such as grammar, mechanics, and vocabulary development. The curriculum encourages students to think critically and make connections across a wide range of texts and disciplines.

Reader's Workshop Overview

  • Read Aloud (Model a reader’s thinking)
  • Independent Reading and Conference (Develop a daily habit of reading and discussing self-selected novels)
  • Shared Novels (Spy School, Fever 1793)
  • Reading Units:
    • Building a Reading Life
    • Envisionment, Prediction, and Inference
    • Fluency: Reading for Sound and Meaning
    • Reading More Deeply
    • Nonfiction Reading

Writer's Workshop Overview

  • Vocabulary (Meaningful words drawn from across the curriculum & WordMasters Challenge)
  • Writing takes place across the curriculum. Writing takes places across the curriculum and includes strong instruction on grammar and writing mechanics.
  • Writing Units:
    • Poetry: Free-verse, Ode         
    • Narrative: Short Story
    • Expository: Essay and Literary Reflections

Mathematics

Congressional Schools’ Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Children develop an appreciation for math as a means of solving a problem.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach.

Fifth grade math is taught with a collaborative, hands-on approach where students are challenged to explore the deeper concepts beyond the processes and procedures of the standard algorithms in a safe, risk-taking environment. Students continue their their study of numeracy and operations, in particular,  revisiting order of operations and each of the whole number operations; exploring fraction concepts and operations; transition to  decimal operations and applications; and discover and apply the connections between decimals, fractions, and percents.  The skills of estimation and approximation are  practiced in many different type of situations.  An introduction to ratios and rates  as a means to compare two and three quantities is presented and connected to the study of fractions.  

Students further their knowledge of geometry by first revisiting the concepts of perimeter and area. Strategies for finding the perimeter and area of various regular and composite figures are explored and proceduralized.  Students work to define the characteristics, relationships, and properties of angles,  triangles and quadrilaterals. Students are introduced to the ideas and application of visual representations to analyze data, including line graphs, and to apply the concept of an average. Technology, including iPads, SmartBoards, and web-based applications such as Khan Academy,  is integrated as appropriate for concept exploration, procedural practice, and skill enhancement.

Through various projects, the idea that math is more than a set of procedures is developed and reinforced.  Highlights include:

  • Solving word problems using Singapore “model drawing” strategies
  • Communicating mathematical ideas effectively 
  • Applying new concepts through projects and collaborative activities
  • Taking risks when applying new ideas and concepts
  • Finding patterns in numbers and operations
  • Exploring the logic and beauty of geometry

Science

Using hands-on experiments, group discussions and field studies, fifth graders develop a sound understanding for the foundations of Physical, Life and Earth Science.  Fifth graders are introduced to the basics of physical principles of force, motion and energy by understanding the theory of forces, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and simple machines with application in day-to-day situations.  

Life science begins with the classification of living systems and evolves into studying the complexity of living systems and life at the cellular level. This investigation helps students appreciate the processes that govern microbial, plant and animal life and how life forms adapt to various environmental conditions. Building on lessons from Physical and Life Science, Earth science focuses on the influence of abiotic factors such as light, water and soil on the development of life and the relationships of  living things to their environment.  Students complete a deep investigation of the ocean as an ecosystem learning about the biotic and abiotic factors that influence the different ocean habitats.

The use of ocean resources by humans for harvesting food and other products while also helping understand the consequences of human activity on disturbing the delicate balance of the ocean ecosystem will help students understand the principles of conservation of natural resources.

Units of Study:

  • Introduction to Experimental Design and Procedure 
  • Metrology - introduction to the metric system (units, tools of measurement and conversion)
  • Classification of Living systems
  • Sound
  • Force
  • Simple Machines
  • Ocean Ecosystem


Social Studies

In fifth grade, students journey through a study of pivotal events in American History. They embark with a review of key map skills and then apply those skills as they study Native American migration routes and regions, exploration, settlements, colonies, slavery, colonial Williamsburg, and elements of the American Revolution. The units involve a number of important skills, such as comparing and contrasting, sequencing events, identifying main idea and details, collecting and synthesizing information, interpreting graphic information, locating, organizing, analyzing, and evaluating resources, and writing for a variety of Social Studies purposes.  

Hands-on learning and problem solving opportunities are regularly woven into the students’ learning experience as a way to engage and equip them with important critical thinking practices. Students hone their ability to communicate and collaborate when they recreate the food, shelter, and clothing elements of Native American migration. Working in small groups, students use key cooperation and organization skills to create descriptive videos detailing the key aspects from exploration to colonization. Role-play, 3D (virtual and actual) models, and numerous apps became the communication choices for a deep dive into Colonial Williamsburg. These experiences help them to construct their own knowledge in meaningful, active ways.
                                                                                                               
Taking advantage of our proximity to Washington, D.C., our students visit local historic sites such as the Frederick Douglass House. These visits provide important context and deepen their understanding of the impact of events and historical figures.

Fifth Grade Social Studies Overview:

  • Geography of the United States
  • American Indians and Their Land
  • American Indian Cultural Regions
  • Experiential Migration Activity
  • How and Why Europeans Came to the New World
  • Routes and Exploration to the New World
  • Early English Settlements
  • Comparing the Colonies
  • Facing Slavery
  • Life in Colonial Williamsburg
  • The American Revolution
  • The Constitution

French

In Middle School, the French program meets five times a week.The program continues to support language acquisition through context and real life experiences. During this upcoming year, Students will improve their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French while exploring the language and culture of France and the Francophone countries all over the world.

  • The students will review and practice vocabulary for greeting people, introducing oneself, talking about family and friends,pets, favorite colors and animals, feelings, school, food and sports.
  • The students will also learn nationalities, practice skills for ordering in a café, numbers 0-9999, telling time, days of the week, months and dates, weather and clothes for all seasons, professions, stores and places.
  • The students will understand intonation patterns; distinguish between statement, command, and question; understand cause and effect sequences·
  • The students will answer questions that use interrogative expressions such as à qui, combien, où, quel, quelle, qu’est-ce que, est-ce que; determine gender, number, adjectives agreement, verb endings, and word order; 
  • The students will practice daily conversations reusing all the vocabulary learned in class, Discuss daily activities and leisure pastimes, and talk about people and possessions.
  • The students will read simple sentences; Read their own descriptions and stories. 
  • The students will write  simple sentences in the present tense; write questions and answers in complete sentences.
  • The students will write pen pal letters about oneself and interests. comics. weekly Show and Tell using conjugations with all pronouns and a French brochure about a French speaking country. 
  • The students will debate about cultural differences between French and American school systems and driving privileges · 
  • The students will celebrate the French holidays and learn how to bake the specific recipes such as “la mousse au chocolat” for National French week, “la bûche de Noel” for Christmas, “la galette des rois” for “Epiphanie” and “les Crepes” for Mardis gras 

Spanish

Spanish IA is an introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish.The class is taught over the course of two years. Students will develop proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the target language. Students will have the opportunity to perform skits, read novels/stories, conduct a basic conversation in Spanish, write essays, practice listening skills, study grammatical structures in the present tense, and various projects.

  • Themes covered: practice of greeting people, introducing oneself, adjectives,likes/dislikes talking about family and friends, food, weather/seasons, classroom and classes, places for activities, pastimes, possessions, and sports/activities.
  • Grammar topics covered: present tense, future, tense, forming questions, irregular verbs , ir + a + infinitive
  • Projects: family tree, skits, ser book, menu project, flip books, show and tell, video mystery series “eres tú maria”.
  • Spell words accurately using correct accent marks; use correct punctuation; write questions and answers in complete sentences using regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, write dialogues using mastered thematic vocabulary, expressions, and structures.
  • Read short stories and novels in Spanish.
  • Gain an appreciation for Hispanic traditions, holidays , and pastimes;  acquire knowledge of the cultural history of various Hispanic countries, their cuisine, diversity of lifestyles, and influence on the U.S.

Art

Fifth Grade artists are introduced to as many mediums, movements and ideas as possible with the goal of enhancing their appreciation of various forms of art and exploring a multitude of ideas. There are three main components to the middle school art program, classical techniques, technology integrated arts and traditional global arts.

In classical techniques, we explore introduction to drawing utilizing a variety of media including pencil and charcoal while drawing from life and imagination.  In technology integrated arts, 5th Grade explores, Computer Aided Design / 3-D printing, Claymation, and Digital Self-Portraits.  In traditional Global Arts, 6th Grade artists explore the Art of the Americas where they create a unique project every year inspired from the indigenous people of the continent.  Possibilities include Dream-catchers, totem poles, Rain-sticks, etc.

Middle School students go beyond the practice of art with a study of the history of art. Typically prior to each unit, a short slide lecture is given to introduce the project within a historical context.  To further their study of art, Congressional students may also take a field trip that includes visits to the Freer-Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, among others.

Other units in art include:

  • Book arts and printmaking: autobiography and Japanese bound. 
  • Ceramics:  self-portrait caricature pencil holders. 
  • Kinetic Sculpture 
  • Artist Sketchbooks 
  • Abstract Expressionism

Music

This section under construction.

Physical Education

Physical Education is a daily class for Fifth Graders. There is an emphasis on team sports while fostering a love of lifetime fitness. Focus on competence in movement skills and skill combinations during complex movement activities. Students in fifth grade focus on applying movement principles and concepts in complex movement activities; body, space, effort, relationship to movements, and apply principles of accuracy, force, follow-through when projecting objects.

Opportunity to join the: 

  • JV soccer
  • cross country
  • basketball, 
  • lacrosse
  • softball
  • track and field teams

Speech and Drama

Through Speech & Drama, Middle School students are developing critical skills that they carry forward into high school, college, and career. More than just speeches and improvisational scenes, this class represents an opportunity for students to build confidence speaking in front of their peers, developtheir appreciation for drama as an art form, and to channel the emotions that are readily accessible to most children in this age group.

Students enjoy their first formal instruction in Speech & Drama during fifth grade. Specific work focuses on establishing a foundation of effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques while developing and delivering informative speeches. Some broadcast journalism experience is gained as students learn to read from a prompter and speak to the camera, as well as recording radio or podcast style broadcasts on their iPads. Through drama, students have the opportunity to learn more about the use of voice and body in acting by presenting improvised scenes in the classroom that are largely derived from their own personal experiences.

During fifth grade, students will also:

  • explore the communication process 
  • develop active listening strategies 
  • gain experience providing constructive feedback to peers 
  • evaluate their own speech presentations to identify areas for improvement 
  • learn basic theater vocabulary, including stage types and areas of the stage 
  • participate in a literature-based choral reading performance with classmates 
  • attend a live theater performance
Grade 6

The transition into Middle School continues through Sixth Grade as the curriculum continues to build skills and knowledge in preparation for high school. Middle School teaching teams are segmented in to 5/6 and 7/8 teams, and sixth grade students benefit from the relationships they have established with the 5/6 teaching team, further helping to facilitate their transition into Middle School. Students gain more independence at this grade level, and have more opportunities to model kind behavior to younger students through a variety of activities.  

Language Arts
Sixth graders continue to sharpen their reading, writing, and research skills through the Language Arts program. Students explore a variety of genres through shared novels as well as independently selected reading. Shared literature selections include Wonder, The Cay, and City of Ember. As students pursue various genres, they develop the ability to recognize key story elements such as character analysis, conflict, point of view, and plot analysis.

There is a strong emphasis on the writing process as writing skills are increasingly expected across the curriculum. Students are expected to demonstrate their proficiency and mastery over various subject areas through application of writing and grammar skills learned in Language Arts. Students will draft multi-paragraph essays and explore creative writing in the forms of prose and poetry. As they refine and practice (Modern Language Association) MLA appropriate research techniques, they are also leveraging their writing skills in cross-curricular projects with social studies. Vocabulary is enriched through participation in the WordMasters program.

Reader's Workshop Overview

  • Read Aloud (Model a reader’s thinking)
  • Independent Reading and Conference (Maintain a daily habit of reading and discussing self-selected novels)
  • Shared Novels (Wonder, The Cay, and City of Ember)
  • Reading Units:
    1. Maintaining a Reading Life 
    2. Fluency/Comprehension 
    3. Building Explanations and Interpretations  
    4. Reading Deeply and Asking Questions 
    5. Nonfiction Reading

Writer's Workshop Overview

  • Vocabulary (Meaningful words drawn from across the curriculum & WordMasters Challenge)
  • Writing takes place across the curriculum
  • Writing Units:
    1. Poetry: Free-verse and Memoir         
    2. Narrative: Descriptive/Persuasive Essay
    3. Expository: Research Essay, and Literary Reflections

Math
Congressional Schools’ Singapore Math program emphasizes the progression of math concepts from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract. It’s this progression that helps children to better understand the “why” behind mathematical operations.  Children develop an appreciation for math, as a means of solving a problem.  The result is children with a depth of understanding and a confidence to their approach.

In sixth grade, students grapple with increased complexity in problem solving, learning to apply appropriate mathematical tools to unique situations. Sixth grade math is taught with a collaborative, hands-on approach where students are encouraged to take risks when problem solving, learn from their mistakes, and communicate their mathematical learning effectively.  An increased emphasis is placed  on finding the patterns in mathematics, recognizing there is more than one way to solve a problem, and efficiency of solutions.  Students are challenged to calculate area, perimeter, and volume of composite figures, discover the relationships between dimensions, and find missing dimensions.  Circle properties are introduced including finding the diameter, radius, the special ratio pi,  area, and circumference.  Knowledge of quadrilaterals and triangles continues to expand.

A key area for sixth grade mathematics is the study of proportions and its relationship to fractions, ratios and percents.  Students explore the use of proportions through real world word problems; communicate their understanding via model drawing and journal writing;  and apply these concepts in novel situations.  The study of algebra and algebraic expressions continues in sixth grade with increased rigor and challenge. Students are asked to write equations with a single variable  to represent a given situation and to find the solutions.  Fraction operations are reinforced and data analysis is expanded to include developing and interpreting pie charts.  Technology, including iPads, SmartBoards, and web-based applications such as Khan Academy,  continues to be integrated as appropriate for concept exploration,  procedural practice, and skill enhancement.  

Projects and many hands-on activities continue to be employed to help students deepen their understanding of the concepts presented and to challenge students to apply their mathematical knowledge effectively and efficiently.  Special emphasis is placed on the following:

  • Communicating mathematical ideas effectively
  • Taking risks when applying new ideas and concepts
  • Finding patterns in numbers and operations and algebra
  • Exploring the applicability of geometry

Science
Beginning with metrology, understanding the subtleties of accuracy and precision, the sixth grade science curriculum will build the foundation for students to transition into middle school science. Their journey will encompass an inter-disciplinary approach, connecting concepts of matter, energy, weather and climate systems and combining ecological principles, using the Chesapeake Bay to tie these scientific principles together. The unit on matter will span from properties of matter, applying the concept of atoms, molecules and compounds while studying the water molecule and its unique role in phase change, density, adhesion, cohesion and solubility. The role of atmosphere in tandem with the water cycle will lead into a systems approach of the inter-connections of Earth’s viability as a living planet. Building on what is the atmosphere and how anthropogenic and man-made processes affect air quality we will try to explore how our planet adapts and copes from volcanic eruptions to global warming and acid rain. The Chesapeake Bay will be used as a living laboratory with hands-on experiments to understand the importance of wetlands in the sustainability of a healthy ecosystem and the influence of human activities such as agricultural practices on eutrophication of natural ecosystems. Human water usage and power generation activities will propel a discussion of the adverse effects on public health and potable water quality. As we weave the Earth ecosystem together, we will try to understand how we as humanity prepare to explore the outer worlds. Earth and Space Science units will involve the study of the solar system, understanding the principles of gravity, planetary size and distribution and then focus on Earth and the moon’s influence on Earth’s physical processes. The students will also learn the basics of human space exploration, the challenges of living in space and the benefits of human space exploration in our daily lives.

  • Earth Science 
  • Matter 
  • Weather & Climate 
  • Ecology Space

Social Studies/Geography
Beginning in 6th grade, social studies exploration expands to World Geography. In preparation for their travels, students review and apply the necessary tools of geography, which include understanding the difference between absolute and relative location, locating major parallels and meridians, using latitude and longitude to determine absolute location, and measuring distance using scale. Once those skills are in place, students pick up where they left off in American History in fifth grade and familiarize themselves with the key events of the Civil War using the context of history and geography’s close connection. A field trip to Lincoln’s Cottage complements these units. From there, students travel the world in their study of global issues, such as consumption patterns, migration, and globalization. Through the lenses of thematic maps, graphs, migration biographies, and current events, students deepen their understand of the world and practice important skills. They analyze cause and effect and primary sources, sequence events, collect and synthesize information, and evaluate and predict future impact.  

Project-based learning is a key component of the Social Studies experience. Students work together to create 3D (virtual and actual) models, and numerous apps became the communication choices for a deep dive into thematic maps, migration, and globalization.

To complement this learning and with the goal of committing their location to long term memory, the students are regularly quizzed on the location of the United States, Central and South American countries, Asian countries, European countries, African countries, and seas and rivers.

Sixth Grade Social Studies Overview:

  • The Tools of GeographyThe Causes of the Civil War
  • The Civil War
  • A Spatial Way of Thinking
  • Consumption Patterns in the United States: The Impact of Living Well
  • Migration to the United States: The Impact on People and Places
  • Women’s Role in the Development of Africa
  • From Asia to Everywhere
  • Land Use Conflict in the Amazon Rainforest
  • Invisible Borders: Transboundary Pollution in Europe

French 
Congressional students start learning a foreign language in Kindergarten.  In Middle School, the French program meet five times a week.The program continues to support language acquisition through context and real life experiences. During this upcoming year, Students will improve their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French while exploring the language and culture of France and the Francophone countries all over the world.

Students will continue to develop the aptitude to converse about themselves and their surrounding environment using simple sentences containing basic language structures. Students will work towards mastering the important knowledge, skills and understandings of French conversation, grammar, and culture. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects. This program is designed for students who want to practice and improve their spoken French, while adapting their skills to varied communicative situations and addressing different contemporary issues linked to the francophone world. Students will polish their speaking skills through an array of activities games, skits as well as reading, writing and discussion.

  • The student will understand and follow directions in French, such as classroom procedures or directions for using iPad and other classroom technology.
  • The student will participate in dictations and be able to write down sentences that are said out loud.
  • The student will speak in complete sentences with correct pronunciation and intonation.
  • The student will discuss actions that involve other people and oneself applying the mechanics of the French grammar learned throughout the year with the appropriate tense (the present, near past and future).
  • The student will identify key words, cognates and some mechanical expressions when reading.
  • The student will read standardized messages once vocabulary has been learned, such as signs, schedules, newspaper headlines, advertisements, and menus.
  • The student will familiarize themselves with the Francophone countries from all over the world.The student will celebrate French holidays throughout the school year. 

Spanish
Spanish IB is the second half of Spanish IA, as the class is taught over the course of two years. Students will continue to develop proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the target language. Students will have the opportunity to perform skits, read novels/stories, conduct a basic conversation in Spanish, write essays, practice listening skills, study grammatical structures in the present tense, and various projects. They begin to show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures, and they are exposed to more complex features of the Spanish language. They continue to focus on communicating about their immediate world and daily activities. They read material on familiar topics and write short, directed compositions. Emphasis continues to be placed on use of Spanish in the classroom as well as on use of authentic materials to learn about Spanish-speaking cultures.

  • Themes covered: ordering in  restaurant, hosting a quinceanera and celebrations, house (rooms and items), household chores, shopping in a clothing store, clothing, descriptions of clothing and sizes, vacations, helping out in the community, means of communication, technology, movie and television.
  • Grammar topics covered: present tense verbs (regular and irregular), possessive adjectives, difference between ser vs. estar, making comparisons, the superlative, present progressive, affirmative tu commands, demonstrative adjectives, direct object pronouns, preterite tense verbs, the personal a, ,indirect object pronouns, acabar de + infinitive, saber vs. conocer.  
  • Projects: house, skits, shopping project, restaurant project, flip books, show and tell, video mystery series “eres tú maria”.  
  • Spell accurately using accent marks, proper capitalization, and punctuation; write questions and answers  
  • Gain an appreciation for Hispanic traditions, holidays , and pastimes;  acquire knowledge of the cultural history of various Hispanic countries, their cuisine, diversity of lifestyles


Music
Under construction - coming soon.

Art
Sixth Grade artists are introduced to as many mediums, movements and ideas as possible with the goal of enhancing their appreciation of various forms of art and exploring a multitude of ideas. There are three main components to the middle school art program, classical techniques, technology integrated arts and traditional global arts.

In classical techniques, we explore introduction to drawing utilizing a variety of media including pencil and charcoal while drawing from life and imagination.  In technology integrated arts, 6th Grade explores, Computer Aided Design / 3-D printing and Animation.  In traditional Global Arts, 6thGrade artists explore the Art of Australia where they create a unique project every year inspired from the indigenous people of the continent. Possibilities include dot paintings or Mimih (small sculpture carvings of mythological impish creatures.)

Middle School students go beyond the practice of art with a study of the history of art. Typically prior to each unit, a short slide lecture is given to introduce the project within a historical context.  To further their study of art, Congressional students may also take a field trip that includes visits to the Freer-Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, among others.

Other units in art include:

  • Fantasy fiction pop-up books 
  • Ceramic bird feeders
  • Conceptual maquettes
  • Artist Sketchbooks
  • Cubism

Physical Education
Physical Education is a daily class for Sixth Graders. There is an emphasis on team sports while fostering a love of lifelong fitness. Focus on competence in movement skills and skill combinations during complex movement activities. Students in fifth grade focus on individual contribution to team play for common goal, support of others during game play, increasing personal fitness levels based on feedback from fitness testing.

In addition the students have the opportunity to join the following teams:

  • JV soccer
  • Cross Country
  • Basketball 
  • Lacrosse
  • Softball
  • Track and Field 


Speech & Drama
Through Speech & Drama, Middle School students are developing critical skills that they carry forward into high school, college, and career. More than just speeches and improvisational scenes, this class represents an opportunity for students to build confidence speaking in front of their peers, developtheir appreciation for drama as an art form, and to channel the emotions that are readily accessible to most children in this age group.  

In sixth grade, students incorporate visual elements into public speaking and gain experience giving a demonstration to their peers. Students also transition from fully-scripted speeches to notes and bullet points as prompts for their presentations. In broadcast journalism, students begin collaborating with classmates and contributing to the script for news reports. Drama work turns to scripted scenes, allowing students to take on the personas of new characters while exploring how to stage their performances effectively.

During sixth grade, students will also:

  • demonstrate active listening strategies
  • analyze organization of content, language, and word choice in oral presentations
  • continue to use self-evaluation to improve speaking skills
  • focus on gesture, movement, projection, inflection and articulation in acting
  • utilize technical elements in drama work
  • begin exploring script analysis
  • participate in a readers theater performance with classmates
  • attend a live theater performance

 

Grade 7

Increased academic expectations in Seventh Grade continue as we prepare students for the rigors of high school. Leadership opportunities are more abundant beginning in this grade as the students develop their individual sense of identity, and confidence. Many experiences are available to broaden their horizons; Student Council, Varsity team sports, the school musical, a 7th Grade team building retreat, Middle School international travel opportunities are among the many choices presented. 

Language Arts

English 7 develops skills in reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary. The literature curriculum includes instruction in close reading and analysis of story elements, including plot, setting, character, point of view, and theme. Students read choice books, short stories and the following texts:

  • The Adventures of Ulysses 
  • The Giver 
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer 
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream 

Students learn strategies to improve the writing process, with detailed instruction in brainstorming, outlining, editing, and revising. Writing types will include creative pieces, expository essays, and an introduction to analytical writing through quotation identifications. Class grammar study focuses on improving writing through accurate mechanics and richer sentence structure. For vocabulary, students compete in the WordMasters Challenge and practice using context clues to define unknown words in novels.

Math

The algebra units of study are complex and exciting.  Recall of past math facts will be essential to move forward with the exploration of the concepts this year.  The focus is to utilize their existing information to support new algorithms while developing solution strategies.  Students will be encouraged to think in more abstract terms in order to explore material at a variety of levels and from more than one perspective.  In our seventh grade mathematics class, students move away from the expectation that there will always be a single “right” answer.  Rather, they will be expected to create more than one solution path to more open questions that focus on the understanding of the concept and the solving process.  They will be encouraged to develop justifications in supporting their opinions, ideas and conclusions.   Technology is integrated as appropriate for concept exploration procedural practice and skill enhancement.  The one-to-one iPad program allows each student to have consistent access to their Khan Academy account, as well as enriching math Apps.

Students will take part in creating a safe, supportive classroom atmosphere where taking academic risks is celebrated and mistakes are utilized as opportunities for learning.  Students will practice communicating their mathematical ideas effectively through large group discussions, partner shares and written work.  Students will develop an appreciation for the beauty of math, as well as an appreciation for their own individual problem solving strategies. 

Topics covered include:

  • Solving equations and inequalities 
  • Polynomials; combining and factoring 
  • Linear Equations; solving systems and graphing  
  • Quadratic equations; solving  
  • Simplifying expressions with variables and exponents 

Science

Life science strives to develop in each student a basic understanding of and appreciation for the diversity of living things in our world, while also reinforcing understanding and utilization of the scientific method.  Emphasis is placed on the fundamental concepts of living things with in-depth exploration of the five kingdoms of organisms and their interactions with ecosystems.  In so doing, students will gain a deeper understanding of human impacts on global ecological systems while also becoming more aware of the microscopic world and its implications on the world around them.

Instructional strategies such as group collaboration and lab activities will be used to classify living things, including bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals.  General knowledge will include the cell and its organelles as well as their functions.  Time will also be devoted to understanding genetics and its unique role in evolution.  Students will also investigate ecology, including populations and ecosystems.   Various instructional strategies such as lecture and note taking, audio-visual aids, inquiry based learning, group collaboration, and hands on lab activities, will all be used to facilitate different student learning styles.

Topics in life science include the following:  structural and functional organization of living things; cell structure and function; genetics, including early history of DNA, probability and inheritance, mutations and heritability as explored through genetic disorders; theory of evolution and natural selection; environmental issues; the five kingdoms of organisms and their diversity; human body systems and stages of development.

  • Potential term projects:  STEM Day experiments, student choice
  • Sample Labs:  Cell modeling, creating slides of human and plant cells, DNA extraction, Punnett squares, blood typing, dissection of one or more preserved or fresh specimens, plant or fungal cultivation, water quality and effects on microscopic organisms

Social Studies/World History

The seventh grade curriculum is a survey of world history, beginning with the rise of humankind and covering significant historic eras up to and including the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Age.

Students examine where the earliest civilizations took root and how the elements of culture and civilization spread around the globe. From the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to the Middle Ages, Exploration and Colonization, and ultimately the Age of Reason, students learn to analyze events and evaluate their impact. Concepts such as democracy, republic, legal codes, economic systems, and political, scientific and religious revolutions are examined with an emphasis on their effect on later American history.

During the course of the year, students will research and write a report on significant movements in world history. Specific instructions are given for structure and content of the report. An oral report and visual presentation accompany each report. In addition, students will work with time lines, maps and ancillary readings to aid them in comprehending the most significant aspects of the periods of history covered. Specific emphasis is placed on but not limited to the following:

  • ancient kingdoms
  • Greek democracy and Roman republic
  • Middle Ages economy and society
  • Renaissance and Reformation
  • Exploration and Colonization
  • Enlightenment, Absolutism and Revolution

French

In Middle School, the French program meets five times a week.The program continues to support language acquisition through context and real life experiences. During this upcoming year, Students will improve their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French while exploring the language and culture of France and the Francophone countries all over the world.

Students begin to develop communicative competence in French and expand their understanding of the culture(s) of francophone countries. A key aspect of learning French is using the language in the actual world outside the classroom setting. At Congressional, technology is integrated with iPads and SmartBoards, enabling students to access authentic information in French  and to offer students the opportunity to interact with other French speakers. Students will continue to work toward mastering the important knowledge, skills and understandings of French conversation, grammar, and cultures. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects. This course is designed for students who want to practice and improve their spoken French, while adapting their skills to varied communicative situations and addressing different contemporary issues linked to the francophone world. Students will polish their speaking skills through an array of activities games, skits as well as reading, writing and discussion. All students will take the National French Exam- level I in the Spring.

  • The student will recognize present, past, and future tenses by regular and irregular verb forms and time expressions.
  • The student will recognize more sophisticated vocabulary and grammar structures, spoken by native speakers at a natural conversation speed.
  • The student will sustain a short conversation on a familiar topic.
  • The student will give a short presentation entirely in French about a famous French person.
  • The student will create and recite a French poem.
  • The student will perform and record a skit in French with peers.
  • The student will write short paragraphs applying the mechanics of the French grammar learned throughout the year.
  • The student will write material, using structures that reflect present, past, and future time.

Spanish

Spanish II A will focus on  further developing  the four primary communicative skills in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading and writing. They begin to show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures, and they are exposed to more complex features of the Spanish language. They continue to focus on communicating about their immediate world and daily activities. They read material on familiar topics and write short, directed compositions. Emphasis continues to be placed on use of Spanish in the classroom as well as on use of authentic materials to learn about Spanish-speaking cultures.  Students will work toward mastering the essential knowledge, skills and understandings of Spanish conversation, grammar, and cultures.  This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, and projects. In order to fully understand the impact and the influence of the Spanish language on today's society, we will also study the rich cultures, customs, current events and geographies of several Spanish-speaking countries in the target language. In the Spring, all students will take level I of the National Spanish Exam.

  • Themes covered: daily routine, classes, clothing, shipping, town and community, means of transportation, family traditions, and childhood.
  • Students will learn how to use the present and past tenses, commands, reflexive verbs, direct object pronouns,, imperfect vs. preterite, cardinal numbers, possessive adjectives, prepositions, and reciprocal actions.
  • Students will gain an appreciation for Hispanic traditions, holidays , and pastimes;  acquire knowledge of the cultural history of various Hispanic countries, their cuisine, diversity of lifestyles, and influence on the U.S
  • Projects: essays/compositions, skits, pen pal letters with another school, daily routine project, childhood project, design a town and give directions, preterite flip books, show and tell,video mystery series “en busca de la verdad” and blogs.
  • Students will read novelas that are written in Spanish.

Latin

In seventh grade, students use Unit I of the Cambridge Latin series. The major grammar topics include three cases for three declensions, direct and indirect pronouns, four verb conjugations in three tenses and irregular verbs. All grammar topics are introduced in an evenly paced manner so that students can competently master basic skills before progressing to more sophisticated structures. Vocabulary expansion occurs as emphasis is placed on the Latin origins of English words. Students become familiar with both grammar and cultural topics in a story format. Throughout the year, they follow the family of Caecilius and daily life in the Roman city of Pompeii in the year 79 CE. The story ends with the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and the mystery of who has or has not survived this tragic event. All seventh grade Latin students take the National Latin exam each spring. Other areas covered during the year include:

  • day-to-day life in Roman society 
  • Roman mythology and history 
  • Roman numerals 
  • ancillary readings on various topics related to the Latin language, and Roman culture and history

Music

Under construction - coming soon.

Art

Seventh Grade artists are introduced to as many mediums, movements and ideas as possible with the goal of enhancing their appreciation of various forms of art and exploring a multitude of ideas. There are three main components to the middle school art program, classical techniques, technology integrated arts and traditional global arts.

In classical techniques, we explore introduction to drawing utilizing a variety of media including pencil, charcoal, and conté while drawing from life and imagination.  7th Grade artists also begin to explore figurative gesture drawing and self-portraits.  More so, students are introduced to fundamental painting techniques in acrylic.  In technology integrated arts, 7th Grade explores, Computer Aided Design / 3-D printing and stop-motion.  In traditional Global Arts, 7th Grade artists explore the Art of Africa and the Middle East where they create a unique project every year inspired from the indigenous peoples of the continents.  Possibilities include Adinkra symbol paintings and arabesque ceramics.

Middle School students go beyond the practice of art with a study of the history of art. Typically prior to each unit, a short slide lecture is given to introduce the project within a historical context.  To further their study of art, Congressional students may also take a field trip that includes visits to the Freer-Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, among others.

Other units in art include:

  • Botanical Ceramics
  • Artist Sketchbooks
  • Found Objects sculpture

Speech & Drama
Through Speech & Drama, Middle School students are developing critical skills that they carry forward into high school, college, and career. More than just speeches and improvisational scenes, this class represents an opportunity for students to build confidence speaking in front of their peers, develop their appreciation for drama as an art form, and to channel the emotions that are readily accessible to most children in this age group.  

Seventh grade students continue developing and improving communication skills while incorporating figurative language, giving and seeking information in discussions, and supporting a position while acknowledging opposing viewpoints in full-class debate. Speeches are persuasive and inspirational in nature. Students take full creative control in broadcast journalism as they research, write and film a special news report on a school-related topic. Memorization is incorporated into drama work as students act in two or three person scenes.

During seventh grade, students will also:

  • analyze ideas and opinions to determine relevancy 
  • identify relationship between verbal and nonverbal messages in presentations 
  • continue to use self-evaluation to improve speaking skills 
  • incorporate unscripted comments with fluency 
  • identify dramatic elements of plot, character, setting, dialogue and conflict 
  • learn to break down a script/scene for rehearsal and performance 
  • attend a live theater performance

Athletics
Physical Education is a daily class for Seventh Graders. There is an emphasis on developing proficiency in one or more team sports while fostering a love of lifelong fitness. Students focus on continuing to improve individual performance on physical fitness tests, ability to articulate achievement of goals. Students in seventh grade focus on individual contribution to team play for common goal, support of others during game play or recreation activities. 

Additionally, students in seventh grade are required to participate in one team sport during the school year. The choices include:

  • Soccer
  • Cross Country
  • Volleyball
  • Basketball
  • Lacrosse
  • Softball
  • Track and Field 

 

Grade 8

Eighth Grade students are the senior class at Congressional, and this milestone in their educational journey is celebrated all year, starting in the fall when they received their coveted graduating class jackets. The high school application process begins in this grade, and students and parents are guided through, step by step from the initial school search through application and interview process. Academic expectations in Eighth Grade continue to be high, and students continue to be encouraged to have a well-rounded approach to their education through participation in Varsity sports, after school activities, extra curricular programs, and leadership opportunities.  

Language Arts

English 8 continues the focus on developing skills in reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary. The literature curriculum includes instruction in close reading and analysis of theme and character development. Students read poetry, short stories, articles, essays and speeches, in addition to the following texts:

  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Animal Farm
  • The Book Thief
  • Macbeth

Course writing consists of regular analytical responses and detailed instruction in analytical essays, including crafting a compelling introduction and conclusion, and detailed, thesis-driven body paragraphs. Students fine-tune writing skills through guided peer editing and revising multiple drafts. Grammar study focus mainly on common sentence errors and writing style, which will provide instruction for enhancing student writing. For vocabulary, students compete in the WordMasters Challenge and practice using context clues to define unknown words in novels. 

Math - Geometry

Geometry class follows an algebraic based Geometry curriculum; this is a non-proof based geometry program that serves to create strong connections between algebra and geometry. Formal theorems will be introduced, and students will begin to write justifications for each of their solution steps. Technology is integrated as appropriate for concept exploration, procedural practice and skill enhancement.  The one-to-one iPad program allows each student to have consistent access to their Khan Academy account, as well as supporting math Apps (such as GraphIt and Educreations).  We will begin the year solidifying our understanding of Euclidean Geometry, and move right into Geometric Reasoning.  Strong recall of previously learned algebra processes will be essential for this course as we explore topics such as Line Relationships, Properties and Attributes of Triangles, Quadrilaterals and Circles.  Critical thinking skills, complex reasoning and strong work ethic will be relied upon as we tackle concepts such as Triangle Congruence and Similarity.

Students will learn in a safe, supportive classroom atmosphere where taking academic risks is essential; mistakes are shared, explored and utilized as opportunities for learning and improvement.  Students will explore and discuss mathematical concepts, demonstrate tenacity while working through possible solutions, collaborate to work towards a common goal and articulate their solution paths verbally and through their written work. Students will develop an appreciation for the beauty of math, as well as an appreciation for their own individual problem solving techniques.

The depth and complexity of each of these additional topics will also be explored:

  • Pythagorean Inequalities
  • Applying Characteristics of special Quadrilaterals to solve problems
  • Similarity between polygons
  • Exploring Perimeter and Area in the coordinate plane (including irregular shapes)
  • Introduction to Trigonometry
  • Three dimensional figures; dimensions and their properties

Math - Complexities of Algebra with an Introduction to Geometry

This curriculum allows students the opportunity to further solidify and deepen their existing knowledge of Algebra, explore the more complex concepts of Algebra, and devote the remainder of the year to begin our exciting journey with Geometry.  Challenging applications of both previously covered topics and new topics are offered; the depth and complexity of each of these topics will be explored.  The geometry portion of the class will be formally introduced as a non-proof based geometry curriculum, creating strong connections between algebra and geometry.  Formal theorems will be introduced, and students will begin to write justifications for each of their solution steps.   Technology is integrated as appropriate for concept exploration procedural practice and skill enhancement.  The one-to-one iPad program allows each student to have consistent access to their Khan Academy account, as well as supporting math Apps (such as Explain Everything, GraphIt and Educreations).  

Students will learn in a safe, supportive classroom atmosphere where taking academic risks is celebrated and mistakes are utilized as opportunities for learning.  Students will explore and discuss mathematical concepts, brainstorm possible solutions, collaborate to work towards a common goal and articulate their solution paths verbally and through their written work. Students will develop an appreciation for the beauty of math, as well as an appreciation for their own individual problem solving strategies.  Topics covered will include:

  • Linear equation relationships and their solutions 
  • Quadratic equations 
  • Rational Expressions 
  • Fundamentals of Geometry 
  • Inductive and deductive reasoning 
  • Complex Angle Relationships 
  • Triangle Exploration

Science

Physical Science is inquiry-based and designed to teach students to explore various principles of chemistry and physics.  Students will learn and implement the scientific method, perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and pose explanations based on evidence, both in writing and presentation.  Experiential learning is an important part of this course; students participate in laboratory investigations and select field trips.  

Students will further refine their scientific literacy by developing an understanding of scientific theories and laws.  Students will also improve their critical thinking skills as they research topics and present information, both orally and by constructing models.  

Chemistry invites and challenges students to further their understanding of the physical and chemical properties of matter.  Topics covered include the following:  atomic history and modeling; organization of the elements in the periodic table; ionic and covalent bonding and chemical reactions; understanding scientific theories and laws, specifically the law of conservation of energy and matter; identifying and working with acids, bases, and salts.

  • Term project planned:  element research paper and modeling
  • Sample Labs:  properties of matter, density columns, ionic & covalent bonding puzzles, rock candy or other crystal growth, acid/base indicators & reactions

Physics provides an opportunity to understand processes within the physical world and our interactions with it.  Topics covered include the following:  forms of energy and their conversions, including potential, kinetic, and thermal energy; forces and motion, including mass, inertia, momentum, friction, gravity, speed, and acceleration; power and work; electromagnetics including wave characteristics and magnetism; electricity, including charge, current, and circuits.

  • Term project planned:  STEM project, student choice
  • Sample Labs: paper airplane speed and acceleration, egg drop, potential/kinetic energy ramps, power/work & horsepower, momentum & collisions, construction of circuits

Social Studies

In eighth grade, the students take a comprehensive study of the history of the United States. Basic concepts and themes from the seventh grade history class are build upon and enhanced. Beginning with the settlement of Jamestown, students learn the initial causes of what will later become the Civil War between the agrarian South and industrial North. In addition to the study of the country’s history, students will spend several weeks studying the Constitution, and as the year progresses, they will apply their knowledge of the Constitution to analyze and evaluate later historic events. Primary source reading is an essential aspect for the students to understand better the historic events they read about in their textbooks. Additional activities include but are not limited to:

  • Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) essay contest
  • Research report on a twentieth century president
  • Field trip to Monticello and Montpelier
  • Overnight trip to Jamestown and Williamsburg
  • Other field trips have included tours of the Capitol, Supreme Court, Smithsonian Institute and the Archives

French

In Middle School, the French program meets five times a week.The program continues to support language acquisition through context and real life experiences. During this upcoming year, Students will improve their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French while exploring the language and culture of France and the Francophone countries all over the world.

In French 8, students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in  the language. They begin to show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures, and they are exposed to more complex features of the language. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects. This course is designed for students who want to practice and improve their spoken French, while adapting their skills to varied communicative situations and addressing different contemporary issues linked to the francophone world. Students will polish their speaking skills through an array of activities games, skits as well as reading, writing and discussion. All students will take the National French Exam- level II in the Spring.

  • The student will identify main ideas and pertinent details when listening to materials such as live and recorded conversations, brief lectures, short news videos and so forth.
  • The student will comprehend and reply appropriately to directives presented in more complex informational materials.
  • The student will contribute in oral exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames, and will describe a sequence of events in the past tense, using the near past and imperfect tenses.
  • The student will express feelings, opinions, and hypotheses using subjunctive and conditional structures.
  • The student will read and comprehend articles in magazines, and online French news sites.
  • The student will read authentic and level-appropriate materials to learn about the French language and francophone culture(s) and respond to comprehension questions. 
  • Students will work toward mastering their French writing skills emphasizing the importance of  grammar mechanics, and French cultures. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects.

Spanish

Spanish IIB is the second half of Spanish II. In Spanish IIB, students will continue to  focus on developing further in depth the four primary communicative skills in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will also and make oral and written presentations in Spanish. They begin to show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures, and they are exposed to more complex features of the Spanish language. They continue to focus on communicating about their immediate world and daily activities. They read material on familiar topics and write short, directed compositions. Emphasis continues to be placed on use of Spanish in the classroom as well as on use of authentic materials to learn about Spanish-speaking cultures. Students will work toward mastering the essential knowledge, skills and understandings of Spanish conversation, grammar, and cultures.  This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, and projects.In order to fully understand the impact and the influence of the Spanish language on today's society, we will also study the rich cultures, customs, current events and geographies of several Spanish-speaking countries in the target language. In the Spring, all students will take level II of the National Spanish Exam.

  • Themes covered:talk about accidents and storms, television and movies, food and cooking, tourism, traveling, booking a trip, airport, professions, improving the world and the environment, legends and stories of Latin America, present, past and future events, preparing and describing food, ordering meals in a restaurant, talking about hypothetical situations, expressing wishes and obligations, · Listen and infer actions and motives from  narrated passages and dialogues · Make a persuasive argument; interpret the feelings or values of others and give advice, make recommendations.  
  • Students will learn how to use the preterite vs. imperfect tenses, future tense, present tense, present subjunctive, usted and ustedes commands, present perfect, and uses of por and para.
  • Students will gain an appreciation for Hispanic traditions, holidays , and pastimes;  acquire knowledge of the cultural history of various Hispanic countries, their cuisine, diversity of lifestyles, and influence on the U.S.
  • Projects: write a fairy tale story, show and tell,  future website project, blogs, pen pal project, cooking show, tourist guide project, newscast project, and various skits.
  • Students will read novelas that are written in Spanish.

Latin

Eighth grade Latin students use Unit II of the Cambridge Latin series. While a thorough review of the basic skills continues throughout the school year, new topics are introduced, including: the genitive, ablative and vocative cases, the two remaining declensions, the pluperfect tense and present and past participles and their uses, relative and reflexive pronouns, and prepositions and the cases they govern. The story line continues with some familiar characters from the previous year, but the venue changes to Roman Britain and, later, to ancient Alexandria. All eighth grade Latin students take the National Latin exam each spring. Other areas covered during the year include:

  • Use of a foreign language dictionary
  • Ancillary readings on various topics related to the Latin language, and Roman culture and history

Music

Under construction - coming soon.

Art

Eighth grade artists are introduced to as many mediums, movements and ideas as possible with the goal of enhancing their appreciation of various forms of art and exploring a multitude of ideas. There are three main components to the middle school art program, classical techniques, technology integrated arts and traditional global arts. 

In classical techniques, we explore introduction to drawing utilizing a variety of media including pencil, charcoal, and conté while drawing from life and imagination.  8th Grade artists also begin to explore figurative gesture drawing and self-portraits.  In technology integrated arts, 8th Grade explores, Computer Aided Design / 3-D printing and website design.  In traditional Global Arts, 8th Grade artists explore the Art of Asia and India, specifically Rangoli and Chinese brush-painting.
                                                                                                           
Middle School students go beyond the practice of art with a study of the history of art. Typically prior to each unit, a short slide lecture is given to introduce the project within a historical context.  To further their study of art, Congressional students may also take a field trip that includes visits to the Freer-Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, among others.

Other units in art include:

  • Ceramic Self-portrait silhouettes 
  • Artist Sketchbooks 
  • Installation Sculpture

Speech & Drama

Through Speech & Drama, Middle School students are developing critical skills that they carry forward into high school, college, and career. More than just speeches and improvisational scenes, this class represents an opportunity for students to build confidence speaking in front of their peers, developtheir appreciation for drama as an art form, and to channel the emotions that are readily accessible to most children in this age group.

Eighth grade is the culmination of the students’ work in Speech & Drama. Public speaking assignments call for impromptu speaking, paraphrasing, clarifying and expanding on topics, and incorporating visual media. Students conduct an on-camera interview and conceive, film, and edit a public service announcement as part of the work in broadcast journalism. Drama study turns to more in-depth script and character analysis before concluding with a solo performance of a monologue by each student.

During eighth grade, students will also:

  • ask probing questions to elicit information
  • analyze credibility of information and messages
  • participate in formal team debate (using Middle School Public Debate Program format)
  • write and deliver unbiased, as well as editorial news reports
  • continue to use self-evaluation to improve speaking skills
  • explore dramatic elements of mood and theme
  • attend a live theater performance

Athletics

Physical Education is a daily class for eighth graders. There is an emphasis on developing proficiency in one or more team sports while fostering a love of lifelong fitness. Students focus on continuing to improve individual performance on physical fitness tests, ability to articulate achievement of goals. Students in seventh grade focus on individual contribution to team play for common goal, support of others during game play or recreation activities. 

Additionally, students in seventh grade are required to participate in one team sport during the school year. The choices include:

  • Soccer
  • Cross Country
  • Volleyball
  • Basketball
  • Lacrosse
  • Softball
  • Track & Field

 

Learning Objectives

Preschool
Junior Kindergarten
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Preschool

Language Arts

Listening

  • The student will develop listening skills.
  • The student learn to listen for details.
  • The student will listen to and recognize rhythms in speech.
  • The student will listen to and follow 2-3 step directions.
  • The student will understand spatial words.

Speaking

  • The student will speak in complete sentences.
  • The student will develop and enhance a personal vocabulary.
  • The student will begin to verbalize emotions.
  • The student will recognize and use descriptive words to identify objects, events and relationships.
  • The student will express thoughts and feelings, wants and needs. 
  • The student will dictate his/her own personal story.

Letter Skills

  • The student will recognize his/her name in print.
  • The student will recognize letters in his/her name.
  • The student will recognize, identify and select most uppercase letters.
  • The student will recognize, identify and select some lowercase letters.
  • The student will recognize that letters have sounds. 
  • The student will recognize and verbalize some beginning sounds. 
  • The student will understand that letters and sounds make words.

Literature

  • The student will develop an appreciation of literature. 
  • The student will learn to care for books. 
  • The student will orient him/herself as to how to hold a book, turn the pages and recognize the front and back of a book.

Concepts of print

  • The student will begin reading print from left to right, left page then right page and top to bottom.
  • The student will understand that words can tell a story (with or without pictures). 
  • The student will understand reading terminology: title, author, illustrator.

Comprehension of literature

  • The student will relate story to topic of study. 
  • The student will identify components of a story: character, setting, conflict, resolution, beginning, middle and end. 
  • The student will make predictions throughout the story. 
  • The student will observe pictures and relate them to the story (context clues). 
  • The student will recall parts of a story. 
  • The student will extend a story to personal experiences.

Writing

  • The student will begin to establish hand dominance. 
  • The student will begin to hold and use writing implements. 
  • The student will begin to develop an appropriate pencil grasp. 
  • The student will trace his/her name. 
  • The student will attempt to write his/her own name. 
  • The student will draw a 3 part person. 
  • The student will copy, draw lines, circles and symbols. 
  • The student will understand how words and pictures help us communicate in everyday life. 
  • The student will express his/her own ideas and stories through illustrations and beginning writing.

 

Math

Number Sense

  • The student will wrote count to 10. 
  • The student will recognize print of numbers 1-10. 
  • The student will identify ordinal numbers (to third place). 
  • The student will identify positional numbers (first, middle, last). 

Number value

  • The student will select a subset from the group 1-10. 
  • The student will count total items in a pre-established group 1-10. 
  • The student will compare number value (more, less). 

Geometry

  • The student will recognize eight basic shapes (circle, square, triangle, rectangle, diamond, oval, heart, star). 
  • The student will compare and identify sizes (small, medium, large). 
  • The student will compare and identify relative size (smaller, bigger). 

Matching & Sorting

  • The student will sort and classify items based on characteristics such as color, size, number and shape. 
  • The student will recognize like objects. 
  • The student will complete simple patterns (ABAB). 
  • The student will complete simple ordinal and chronological sequences. 
  • The student will identify simple opposites (big/little, less/more, etc.).

Weights and Measures

  • The student will classify items based on weight, length and volume. 
  • The student will use measuring tools (ruler, scale, blocks, cups, etc.). 
  • The student will compare and identify sizes (small, medium, large). 
  • The student will compare length (shorter, longer). 
  • The student will compare weight (heavier, lighter). 
  • The student will recognize opposites (short/long, light/heavy).

Spatial Sense

  • The student will demonstrate understanding of spatial positional language (in front of, behind, next to, over/above, under/below). 
  • The student will demonstrate understanding of spatial movement language (forward, backward, sideways, up, down).

 

Social Development

Self-Awareness

  • The student will establish a sense of positive self-identity.
  • The student will establish confidence in ability. 

Personal care

  • The student will recognize and act upon the need to use the restroom. 
  • The student will display the ability to independently use the restroom (use toilet, clean him/herself, flush toilet). 
  • The student will develop a habit of independently washing hands after toilet use. 
  • The student will develop the ability to take care of personal needs (wiping nose, changing own clothes, putting on shoes and socks). 
  • The student will develop the ability to put away personal items (coat, backpack, classwork, etc.).

Communication

  • The student will effectively communicate wants, needs and ideas with peers and adults. 
  • The student will ask for help when needed. 
  • The student will appropriately verbalize with peers during play. 
  • The student will begin recognizing social cues. 
  • The student will develop the use of self-regulation during the day. 
  • The student will develop the ability to transition from physical self-soothing to verbally expressing needs and wants. 
  • The student will understand personal space of self and others. 
  • The student will learn to navigate body in space. 
  • The student will use appropriate voice (volume, kind voices, age-appropriate voice). 
  • The student will recognize, label and regulate feelings.

Moral Development

  • The student will begin to develop an internal sense of right and wrong. 
  • The student will develop and display empathy towards others. 
  • The student will demonstrate care for others through his/her words and actions.

Transitions

  • The student will separate from parents during drop-off with confidence and ease. 
  • The student will identify and appropriately respond to various situations (new, scary, frustrating, etc.). 
  • The student will move from one activity to another in the classroom with ease. 
  • The student will move from classroom to other areas of school (example: specials, lunch, playground, etc.) with ease.

Relationships with Others (Family and Friends)

  • The student will transition from parallel to cooperative play. 
  • The student will demonstrate the ability to take turns. 
  • The student will understand the sharing of materials and space. 
  • The student will attempt to resolve conflicts independently. 
  • The student will respect other’s materials, feelings, and ideas.

Community of the classroom

  • The student will understand the need for rules. 
  • The student will create, identify and follow all classroom/school rules, routines and procedures. 
  • The student will understand accountability. 
  • The student will participate and follow-through with decision making. 
  • The student will be an active participant in maintaining the positive classroom environment. 
  • The student will participate in all large and small group activities. 
  • The student will attend to task and/or activity.

 

Physical Development

Fine Motor

  • The student will begin to develop a pencil grasp. 
  • The student will establish hand dominance. 
  • The student will begin to hold and use scissors appropriately. 
  • The student will use a variety of drawing and art implements correctly. 
  • The student will develop beading and threading skills. 
  • The student will grasp and pick up materials correctly. 
  • The student will build with manipulatives (example: horizontal – making chains, vertical – making towers) 
  • The student will pour from a pitcher. 
  • The student will use eating utensils properly.

Gross Motor

  • The student will walk in and on a line. 
  • The student will appropriately sit in a chair. 
  • The student will sit during circle using “criss-cross” or “pencil” legs. 
  • The student will use alternating feet on stairs without support. 
  • The student will independently put on his own coat.

Demonstration of Physical Abilities

  • The student will explore movement of his body (dancing, running, jumping, climbing, etc.). 
  • The student will appropriately use outdoor play equipment. 
  • The child will participate in group games. 
  • The student will attempt to catch a ball. 
  • The student will display the ability to comfortably cross midline during movement activities

 

Social Studies

  • The student will indicate an awareness of physical attributes of self and others. 
  • The student will identify different/same attributes (hair color, eye color, etc.). 
  • The student will identify developmental stages of life (ex: baby, childhood, adult). 
  • The student will identify family structure (mother, father, sister, brother, etc.). 
  • The student will display an understanding relationships between family and friends.

Geography

  • The student will identify homes, habitats and shelters. 
  • The student will understand the need for shelter. 
  • The student will recognize and interpret features and locations of homes in their environment and elsewhere. 

Diversity

  • The student will understand relationships to self to others. 
  • The student will develop an awareness of the similarities and differences of others. 
  • The student will begin to understand cultural backgrounds and celebrations.

Community Helpers

  • The student will identify familiar professionals and the role they play in our community. 
  • The student will identify “tools of the trade” for various professions and occupations.
  • The student will role play various occupations using the appropriate tools.

Time, continuity and change

  • The student will become familiar with the concept of yesterday, today and tomorrow. 
  • The student will recall information and make predictions on the basis of yesterday, today and tomorrow. 
  • The student will begin to associate activities with the “time” of day.

Dramatic Play

  • The student will role play various aspects of real life and imaginative life.

 

Science and Technology

Four Seasons

  • The student will identify, label and describe the four seasons. 
  • The student will recognize how each season is represented by changes in the environment (e.g., falling leaves) and changes in weather (e.g. snow). 
  • The student will recognize how each season affects the way we dress and feel.

Weather

  • The student will observe and report the day’s weather. 
  • The student will use appropriate vocabulary to describe the weather. 
  • The student will understand the effect of weather on dress and activities during the day.

Habitats

  • The student will identify, label and describe various habitats (e.g. forest, sea, desert). 
  • The student will identify animals and plants that may exist in each habitat. 
  • The student will compare and contrast habitats and their attributes. 
  • The student will recognize and identify various landforms (mountains, rivers, etc.).

Day and Night

  • The student will recognize the impact of season on day and night. 
  • The student will identify the attributes of day (sun, light, temperature). 
  • The student will identify the attributes of night (moon, stars, dark, temperature).

Care of the Earth

  • The student will explore the importance of taking care of his/her environment. 
  • The student will begin to understand the concept and importance of recycling. 
  • The student will begin to understand the concept of fire safety.

Physical Science

  • The student will explore the attributes of matter (solid, liquid, gas, weight, density and color). 
  • The student will explore the cause and relationships in everyday experiences (light/ shadow, sink/float).
  • The student will explore and use scientific tools (magnets, rulers, scales).

Scientific Method

  • The student will use their senses to gather information about objects and the environment.
  • The student will make simple observations, predictions, explanations and generalizations based on real life experience.
  • The student will collect, describe and record information through discussion, drawings and charts.

Life Science

  • The student will explore the concept of living versus non-living.
  • The student will identify, label and describe body parts and their relative location.
  • The student will identify the basic needs of all living creatures (food, water, shelter, love).
  • The student will recognize and identify the five senses.
  • The student will identify the body parts used for each of the five senses.
  • The student will describe how each sense helps us learn as well as understand our environment and how it affects it.
  • The student will understand the importance of adopting healthy behaviors (personal care, nutrition, exercise and sleep).
  • The student will begin classifying animals (mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects).
  • The student will identify familiar attributes of animals (e.g. fur, feathers, fins, scales, antenna).
  • The student will identify the basic needs of animals (food, water, shelter, exercise, love).
  • The student will explore nocturnal and diurnal animals.
  • The student will explore the seasonal effects on animals (hibernation, gathering, migration).
  • The student will identify, label and describe parts of a plant.
  • The student will identify basic plant needs (sunlight, water, soil).

Technology

  • The student will explore and use tools of technology.
  • The student will manipulate iPad and SMARTboard applications.

 

Spanish

Listening

  • The student will begin to recognize basic greetings.
  • The student will be able to listen to and begin to understand a short story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement.

Speaking

  • The student will repeat basic vocabulary.
  • The student will begin to use common vocabulary such as numbers, colors, and basic greetings.
  • The students will sing simple songs in Spanish. 

Culture

  • The student will be introduced to basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, and other activities from the Spanish speaking world.

 

Music

Performance and Production

  • The student will share their musical knowledge through vocal exploration, highlighting so and mi. 
  • The student will demonstrate a steady beat on rhythm instruments. 
  • The student will sing and move to a variety of musical genres including classical and world music. 
  • The student will demonstrate the difference between a singing voice and a speaking voice. 

Cultural Context and Music Theory

  • The student will identify classroom instruments by sight and sound. 
  • The student will identify between voices and instruments.

Judgment and Criticism

  • The student will show respect for the contributions of others in a music setting.

 

Physical Education

  • The student will engage in physical activities that promote physical fitness and health.
  • The student will begin to use rules and safe practices in physical activities. 
  • The student will participate in movement exploration. 
  • The student will begin to develop coordination in gross motor skills. 
  • The student will develop throwing, catching and kicking skills. 
  • The student will participate in unstructured and structured activities.
Junior Kindergarten

Language Arts

Oral Language

The student will demonstrate growth in the use of oral language and word meanings

  • Listen to and comprehend stories and poems, participate in songs, rhymes and stories with repeated word order patterns
  • Begin to speak in complete sentences that include subject, verb and object

The student will expand understanding and use of word meanings

  • Listen to and comprehend stories and poems
  • Participate in songs, rhymes and stories with repeated word order patterns
  • Begin to speak in complete sentences that include subject, verb and object 

The student will build oral communication skills

  • Begin to express ideas and needs in complete sentences
  • Begin to follow rules for conversation, including taking turns and staying on topic
  • Begin to participate in group discussions about various topics
  • Begin to follow one, two, and three-step directions

Reading
The student will begin to understand how print is organized and read.

  • Hold print materials in the correct position
  • Identify the front cover, back cover and title page of a book
  • Follow progression of words from left to write and top to bottom

The student will begin to demonstrate an understanding that print conveys meaning

  • Identify common signs and logos
  • Explain that printed materials provide information
  • Begin to read and explain own writing and drawing
  • Read first name and begin to recognize last name

The student will begin to develop an understanding of basic phonetic principles.

  • Identify, distinguish and name upper and lowercase letters of the alphabet
  • Identify and distinguish beginning consonant sounds
  • Begin to identify ending consonant sounds in single syllable words
  • Begin to match consonant sounds to appropriate letters
  • Begin to blend sounds of letters to decode single-syllable words

The student will begin to demonstrate comprehension of fictional and nonfiction texts.

  • Identify the roles of author and illustrator
  • Use pictures to identify topics and make predictions
  • Retell stories using a beginning, middle, and end
  • Discuss characters, setting, and events

The student will begin to print in manuscript using Handwriting Without Tears program.

  • Print uppercase letters of the alphabet independently
  • Begin printing lowercase letters
  • Print his/her first name
  • Begin to print his/her last name

The student will begin to write to communicate ideas.

  • Differentiate pictures from writing
  • Draw pictures and use phonetically spelled words to describe the pictures
  • Write left to right and top to bottom

 

Math

Number and Number Sense: Whole Number Concepts

  • The student will be able to count objects in a given set between 1 and 20 and assign the corresponding numeral.
  • The student will be able to recognize and write numerals from 1 to 20.
  • The student will indicate the ordinal position of each object, first through fifth.
  • The student will find the difference between two groups of objects and will identify one as greater than, less than or equal to.

Computation and Estimation: Whole Number Operations

  • The student will be introduced to the concept of addition using manipulatives and number bonds.

Measurement: Instruments and Attributes

  • The student will begin to tell time to the hour using analog clocks.
  • The student will begin to compare objects (height, weight, length) using nonstandard measurement.
  • The student will begin to recognize a penny, nickel, dime and quarter.

Geometry: Plane Figures

  • The student will identify, describe and draw two-dimensional (plane) geometric figures (triangle, square, rectangle and circle) according to the number of sides
  • The student will describe the location of one object relative to another (above, below, next to, in front of, behind).

Probability and Statistics: Interpretation of Graphs

  • The student will begin to interpret information displayed in a picture or object graph using the vocabulary more, less, fewer, greater than, less than and equal to.

Patterns, Functions and Algebra: Attributes and Patterning

  • The student will sort and classify objects according to one or more attributes (color, size, shape).
  • The student will identify, describe and extend repeating patterns.

 

Science

Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic

  • The student will begin to conduct investigations which develop their natural curiosity.
  • The student will begin to investigate using five senses and corresponding sensing organs.
  • The student will begin to identify and classify foods into the four main food groups.
  • The student will begin to conduct investigations in which the basic properties of objects are identified and described by direct observation.

Force, Motion, and Energy

  • The student will begin to investigate that magnets have an effect on some materials, make some things move without touching them, and have useful applications.
  • The student will begin to investigate and understand that water flows and has properties that can be observed and tested.
  • The student will begin to investigate, understand, and classify living and non-living. 
  • The student will begin to investigate that animals have specific physical characteristics and can be classified according to certain characteristics.
  • The student will begin to investigate the basic life processes of plants and animals and how they change and grow.

Interrelationships in Earth/Space Systems

  • The student will investigate and understand how shadows occur.

Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change

  • The student will begin to investigate simple weather observations in his/her daily life.
  • The student will investigate seasonal changes.
  • The student will label the major parts of the human body.

 

Social Studies

History, Culture, Geography

  • The student will begin to recognize prominent figures associated with historical events and holidays – Johnny Appleseed, Christopher Columbus, George Washington, Martin Luther King, Jr. 
  • The student will study medieval times and compare and contrast everyday life in the present and in the past.
  • The student will begin to describe the relative location of people, animal and places using positional words (near/far, above/below, north/south).
  • The student will begin to develop awareness that maps and globes are used to show the position of places, animals, and people.
  • The student will be introduced to diverse cultures, traditions, languages and people by celebrating different holidays in countries around the world.

Self, Family, and Community

  • The student will be able to identify and define his/her position in the family.
  • The student will be able to recognize himself/herself as a unique individual.
  • The student will be able to develop an understanding of emotions and feelings and express the feelings in an appropriate manner.
  • The student will be able to identify and define a community and the role of people in the community.
  • The student will begin to develop an awareness of the importance of working to earn money and support oneself and family.
  • The student will begin to understand and demonstrate the role of being a good citizen.
    • Taking turns and sharing
    • Taking responsibility for chores in the classroom and at home
    • Following rules and understanding consequences
    • Practicing honesty, self-control, and kindness to others
    • Participating in group settings and decision making in the classroom
  • The student will begin to develop an awareness of environmental issues, habitat preservations and resource conservation.
  • The student will be introduced to the American flag and the Pledge of Allegiance.

 

Music 

Performance and Production

  • The student will share their musical knowledge through vocal exploration, highlighting pitches so, mi and do.
  • The student will perform various rhythmic patterns that include sounds and silences.
  • The student will sing, play and move following vocal and instrumental introduction.
  • The student will use movement to enhance music, stories, and poems.
  • The student will use the body to illustrate moods and contracts in music
  • The student will demonstrate a steady beat on rhythm instruments.

Cultural Context and Music Theory

  • The student will recognize and demonstrate expressive qualities of music including fast/slow and loud/soft.

Judgment and Criticism

  • The student will show respect for the contributions of self and others in a music setting.

 

French

  • The student will recognize and follow basic classroom commands such as asseyez-vous, levez la main, and écrivez votre nom.
  • The student will be able to listen to and understand a short story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement. 
  • The student will communicate with the correct pronunciation of letter sounds. 
  • The student will use common vocabulary such as numbers, colors, and basic greetings. 
  • The student will be able to associate basic vocabulary words to given objects. 
  • The student will be able to recognize the written form of simple words based on initial 
  • The student will be introduced to basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, and other activities from the French speaking world. 
  • The student will celebrate French holidays throughout the year.

 

Spanish

  • The student will begin to recognize basic greetings. 
  • The student will be able to listen to and begin to understand a short story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement.
  • The student will repeat basic vocabulary. 
  • The student will begin to use common vocabulary such as numbers, colors, and basic greetings. 
  • The students will sing simple songs in Spanish.                                           
  • The student will be introduced to basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, and other activities from the Spanish speaking world.

 

Physical Education

  • The student will engage in physical activities that promote physical fitness and health
  • The student will participate in movement exploration to build an understanding of the body and spatial awareness 
  • The student will engage in balance, coordination and flexibility activities 
  • The student will develop skills of dribbling, passing and kicking 
  • The student will participate in unstructured and structured activities 
  • The student will follow rules and safe play in physical activities 
  • The student will develop good sportsmanship, cooperation and teamwork
Kindergarten

Language Arts
Oral Language

  • The student will apply oral language to literature. 
  • Listen to a variety of literary forms, including stories and poems 
  • Tell and retell stories and events in sequential order 
  • The student will verbally communicate with teacher and peers. 
  • Follow and give simple two and three-step directions 
  • Ask and respond to questions in small-group settings 
  • The student will classify words in a sentence.

              - Use words to describe or name a person, place or thing
              - Use words to describe actions
              - The student will understand the concept of rhyme.
              - Identify and create rhyming words orally
              - Generate words in a rhyming pattern

  • The student will understand word parts and sounds.

             - Divide words into syllables
             - Blend sounds orally to make words

Reading

  • The student will understand how print is organized and read.

             - Follow reading from left to right and from top to bottom of a printed page
             - Recognize and name uppercase and lowercase letters
             - Identify words and sentences

  • The student will understand phonetic rules and acquire spelling principles.

            - Pronounce the sound of each letter
            - Use beginning and ending consonant sounds to decode c-v-c words
            - Use consonant blends to decode c-c-v-c and c-v-c-c words
            - Blend beginning, middle and ending sounds to recognize and read words
            - Recognize and read high frequency words
            - Use knowledge of alphabetical order by the first letter

  • The student will demonstrate comprehension of fiction and nonfiction.

            - Use pictures to make predictions about content
            - Discuss character, settings and events
            - Identify the roles of authors and illustrators

Writing

  • The student will print in manuscript.

            - Learn how to write uppercase and lowercase letters of the alphabet using the Handwriting Without Tears program
            - Print his/her first and last name
            - Write from left to right and top to bottom

  • The student will write to communicate ideas.

            - Understand the writing process: getting ideas, prewriting, drafting, revising, and publishing
            - Use descriptive words when writing about people, places, things and events
            - Begin each sentence with a capital letter and use ending punctuation
            - Use high frequency words and phonetically spelled words to write stories
            - Use available technology

Mathematics
Number and Number Sense

  • The student will count objects in a given set between 1 and 100 and write the corresponding numeral.
  • The student will group a collection of up to 100 objects into tens and ones and write the corresponding number.
  • The student will

            - Count forward by ones, fives and tens to 100
            - By twos to 20 and
            - Backwards by ones from 20

  • The student will identify ordinal positions first through tenth.
  • The student will identify and represent the concepts of one-half and one-fourth.


Computation and Estimation

  • The student will solve (using manipulatives and/or recall) addition and subtraction facts to 20
  • The student will use number bonds and ten frames to solve addition and subtraction problems


Measurement

  • The student will

             - Identify pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters and determine their worth
             - Identify the number of pennies equivalent to a nickel, dime and quarter
             - The student will tell time to the hour and half-hour using an analog and digital clock.

  • The student will use nonstandard units to measure length and weight.
  • The student will compare the weights of two objects using a balance scale.
  • The student will

            - Use calendar language appropriately (months, today, yesterday, tomorrow)
            - Identify specific dates on a given calendar

Geometry

  • The student will draw, describe and sort two-dimensional (plane) geometric figures (triangle, square, rectangle and circle) according to the number of sides and corners.
  • The student will identify and describe objects in his/her environment that depict (plane) geometric figures.
  • The student will be introduced to three-dimensional (solid) concrete figures (prism, cube, rectangular prism and cylinder).


Probability and Statistics

  • The student will investigate, identify and describe various forms of data collection in his/her world using tables, picture graphs and object graphs.
  • The student will interpret information displayed in a picture or object graph, using vocabulary more, less, fewer, greater than, less than and equal to.
  • The student will determine whether an estimate is reasonable


Patterns, Functions and Algebra

  • The student will sort and classify concrete objects according to one or more attributes, including color, size and shape.
  • The student will recognize, describe, extend and create a variety of patterns.


Social Studies
History

  • The student will review historical figures through stories, historical accounts and technology: John Chapman, Christopher Columbus, George Washington, Abe Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. and individual figures for Black History Month.
  • The student will identify events honored by the holidays of Thanksgiving Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President’s Day and Independence Day.
  • The student will compare and contrast everyday life in the present and the past.
  • The student will celebrate the history and customs of “Winter Holidays” around the world

Geography

  • The student will develop an awareness of maps and globes and know that a map is a drawing of a place where things are located and that a globe is a round model of the Earth.
  • The student will compare a map to a picture and use a map to get from one place to another.
  • The student will make a map of a community, including buildings found in the community.
  • The student will learn that a compass rose shows direction: north, south, east or west.
  • The student will learn about a specific country and develop an appreciation for the culture, food, dress, music, literature and language.

Economics

  • The student will match simple descriptions of work that people do with the names of those jobs.
  • The student will identify the services provided by communities and that people work to earn money.

Citizenship

  • The student will demonstrate what makes a good citizen: rules, self-control, chores, respect, kindness and honesty.
  • The student will recognize the American flag and will recite the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • The student will know that the president is the leader of the United States.


Science
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic

  • The student will investigate using five senses and corresponding sense organs that allow one to seek, find, take in, and react or respond to information.
  • The student will use and understand sensory descriptors to describe physical properties of an object.
  • The student will conduct investigations in which a set of objects is separated and classified into groups based on physical attributes.

Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change

  • The student will identify different types of weather.
  • The student will explain the relationship of seasonal changes and weather.

Interrelationships in Earth/Space Systems

  • The student will investigate and understand the basic relationship between the sun and the Earth.
  • The student will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system and the relationships among the various bodies that comprise it. Key activities include introducing the names and characteristics of the planets of our solar system, recognizing the sun as a star and the center of our universe, and understanding day and night in relation to the Earth’s movement.

Biology

  • The student will identify the basic components and functions of the systems of the human body.
  • The student will explain that good oral health is related to personal hygiene including the care of one’s teeth. 
  • The student will be able to identify and know the characteristics of “My Plate”. 
  • The student will be able to classify foods into their corresponding food groups.

Life Processes

  • The student will investigate and understand that plants have life needs and functional parts. Key activities include the basic needs and parts of a plant.

Living Systems

  • The student will begin to investigate characteristics of herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. 
  • The student will begin to investigate animals that lived in the prehistoric eras. 
  • The student will begin to investigate extinction and fossil evidence. 
  • The student will investigate that dinosaurs are reptile-like animals and their young were hatched from eggs.nKey activities include becoming aware that dinosaurs lived long ago, the concept of “extinct”, and introduction to dinosaur names and their sizes.

 Force, Motion, and Energy

  • The student will discuss that magnets have magnetic and nonmagnetic poles.
  • The student will understand that magnets attract or repel objects and begin to demonstrate applications of magnetism.


Art 
Creating: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • The student will demonstrate self-expression through creation of works of art. 
  • The student will identify and use: Colors, textures, lines and line characteristics, shapes, background, patterns
  • The student will describe the sequence of steps in making a work of art.
  • The student will manipulate three dimensional art materials.
  • The students will demonstrate motor skills in painting, pasting, gluing, folding, cutting, modeling, printing, and stamping.
  • The student will identify primary and secondary colors.
  • The student will mix secondary colors using a variety of media.
  • The student will identify spatial relationships.


Presenting: Select, Analyze, and interpret art for presentation.

  • The student will select artwork to make a small portfolio.
  • The student will select a preferred work of art from among others and explain why it was chosen.
  • The student will discuss and explain ideas and expressions in personal works of art.


Responding: Perceive and analyse artistic work

  • The student will identify people who make art as artists.
  • The student will identify the purposes for creating works of art.
  • The student will discuss the concept that all cultures create works of art.
  • The student will look at, describe, and respond to works of art.
  • The student will create artwork based on various artists: Mondrian, Monet, Picasso, and Matisse.


Connecting: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art.

  • The student will create a work of art that commemorates a personal or historical event.
  • The student will make a work of art that depicts a specific animal or plant.
  • The student will create a self portrait.
  • The student will create works of art inspired by stories.
  • The student will classify objects in an environment by using art vocabulary: color, texture, line, shape, and pattern.


Music
Performance and Production

  • The student will sing melodies and play instruments as part of a group using simple harmony.
  • The student will move body to a steady beat (march, pat, clap, and stomp).
  • The student will repeat and vocalize beat patterns in double and triple time.
  • The student will match pitches sung or played.
  • The student will recognize and perform even and uneven rhythm patterns.
  • The student will improvise and compose within a given framework.
  • The student will demonstrate beginning choral behaviors and sing with expression appropriate to the repertoire.
  • Cultural Context and Music Theory
  • The student will distinguish between rhythm and steady beat as well as high and low sounds.
  • The student will identify direction of aural melodic patterns and distinguish between step and leap melodic patterns.
  • The student will distinguish between major and minor tonality.
  • The student will recognize contrasting types of music by adjusting body movements when listening and dancing.
  • The student will identify verse, chorus or AB part form, and ABA part form.


Judgment and Criticism

  • The student will show respect for the contributions of self and others in a music setting.

Aesthetics

  •  The student will recognize the relationships between music and other disciplines.


French 

  • The students will identify, name and expand vocabulary learned in Junior Kindergarten such as numbers, colors, shapes, basic greetings, family members, animals, food and drinks, parts of the body, feelings, the weather, the days of the week.
  • The students will identify and name new vocabulary for the months, the seasons, clothes, school items and games. 
  • The students will recognize and follow basic classroom commands in French. 
  • The students will communicate with correct pronunciation 
  • The students will be able to listen to and understand a story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement.  
  • The students will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink. 
  • The students will be able to ask and answer simple questions in French about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The students will be able to sing the songs that they learn in class. 
  • The students will be able to read the booklets that they create (pictures only). 
  • The students will use correct noun and color adjective agreement. 
  • The students will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the francophone world. 
  • The students will celebrate French holidays throughout the year. 


Spanish

  • The student will recognize and use basic sound clues for gender and number.
  • The student will recognize and follow basic classroom commands.
  • The student will be able to listen to and understand short stories with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement.
  • The student will be able to recognize and pronounce the correct sound of a new word. 
  • The student will communicate with correct pronunciation. 
  • The student will use common vocabulary such as numbers, colors, basic greetings, family members, the weather, the days of the week, and clothes.
  • The student will be able to sight read basic words of vocabulary from the lesson. 
  • The student will be able to recognize the written form of vocabulary words based on the sound of each word.
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the Spanish- speaking world. 
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the year.


Physical Education
Movement Concepts

  • Travel within a large group, without bumping into others or falling, while using locomotor skills. 
  • Travel forward and sideways while changing direction quickly in response to a signal. 
  • Demonstrate contrasts between slow and fast speeds while using locomotor skills. 
  • Create shapes at high, medium, and low levels by using hands, arms, torso, feet, and legs in a variety of combinations. 
  • Body Management 
  • Create shapes by using non-locomotor movements. 
  • Balance on one, two, three, four, and five body parts. 
  • Balance while walking forward and sideways on a narrow, elevated surface. 
  • Demonstrate the relationship of under, over, behind, next to, though, right, left, up, down, forward, backward, and in front of by using the body and an object. 
  • Locomotor Movement 
  • Perform a continuous log roll. 
  • Travel in straight, curved, and zigzag pathways. 
  • Jump over a stationary rope several times in succession, using forward and-back, and side-to-side movement patterns 
  • Manipulative Skills

Strike

  • Toss a ball to oneself, using the underhand throw pattern, and catch it before it bounces twice. 
  • Kick a stationary object, using a simple kicking pattern.  
  • Bounce a ball continuously, using two hands.  

Rhythmic Skills 

  • Perform locomotor and nonlocomotor movements to a steady beat. 
  • Clap in time to a simple, rhythmic beat.
Grade 1

Language Arts
Oral Language

The student will demonstrate growth and an understanding of oral language structure.

  • Listen and respond to a variety of media, including books, iPads, various technology 
  • Tell and retell stories and events in logical order. 
  • Participate in a variety of oral language activities, including morning meeting. 
  • Express ideas orally in complete sentences. 
  • Create oral stories to share with others.
  • Create and participate in oral dramatic activities. 
  • Use correct verb tenses in oral communication. 
  • Use increasingly complex sentence structures in oral communication.
  • The student will continue to expand listening and speaking vocabularies. 
  • Increase oral descriptive vocabulary and use words that reflect a growing range of interests 
  • Follow and give two‐step, three‐step, and four‐step oral directions. 
  • Use singular and plural nouns. 
  • Identify and use synonyms and antonyms in oral communication. 
  • The student will use oral communication skills. 
  • Initiate conversation with peers and adults. 
  • Use appropriate voice level in small‐group settings. 
  • Ask and respond to questions in small‐group settings. 
  • Use oral language for different purposes: to inform, persuade, and entertain. 
  • Share stories or information orally with an audience. 
  • Summarize information shared orally by others. 

Word Study

The student will orally identify and manipulate phonemes (small units of sound) in syllables and 

  • Count phonemes (sounds) in syllables or words. 
  • Add or delete phonemes (sounds) orally to change syllables or words. 
  • Create rhyming words orally.
  • The student will apply phonetic principles to read and spell. 
  • Use beginning and ending consonants to decode and spell single‐syllable words. 
  • Use two‐letter consonant blends to decode and spell single‐syllable words. 
  • Use beginning consonant digraphs to decode and spell single‐syllable words. 
  • Use short vowel sounds to decode and spell single‐syllable words. 
  • Blend beginning, middle, and ending sounds to recognize and read words. 
  • Use word patterns to decode unfamiliar words. 
  • Read and spell common, high‐frequency sight words. 
  • The student will use meaning clues and language structure to expand vocabulary when reading. 
  • Use titles and pictures 
  • Use picture clues and story context to decode words. 
  • Use knowledge of sentence structure and sequence.

Reading

The student will read fiction and nonfiction, using a variety of strategies independently.

  • Make predictions about content.
  • Read to confirm predictions. 
  • Preview the selection by using pictures, diagrams, titles, and headings. 
  • Set purpose for reading. 
  • Reread and self‐correct when necessary. 
  • The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of texts 
  • Make text‐to‐self, text‐to‐text, text‐to‐world connections with text. 
  • Ask and answer who, what, when, where, why, and how questions. 
  • Describe characters, setting, and important events. 
  • Retell stories and events, using beginning, middle, and end. 
  • Identify the problem, solution, and main idea. 
  • Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text. 
  • Compare connections between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. 
  • Explain major differences between storybooks and informational books. 
  • Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in a series. 
  • The student will demonstrate comprehension of information in reference materials. 
  • Use a table of contents. 
  • Use pictures and charts. 
  • Use glossaries and indices in texts. 
  • Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text. 
  • Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures). 
  • Students will use appropriate fluency while reading out loud 
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. 
  • Apply a storyteller’s voice while reading out loud using a variety of expressions

Writing

The students will write narratives (small moment stories)

  • Generate ideas before writing
  • Focus on one topic 
  • Recount two or more appropriately sequenced events 
  • Organize writing to include a beginning, middle, and end. 
  • Include details regarding what happened 
  • Use temporal words to signal event order 
  • Include ending for closure  
  • During the revision phase, with support from adults, student will 
  • Respond to questions and suggestions from peers 
  • Add details to strengthen writing  
  • Celebrate writing with others 
  • Students will write informative/explanatory texts where they will 
  • Name a topic 
  • Supply at least 3 facts about the topic 
  • Use words including synonyms and antonyms 
  • Include appropriate closing 
  • Include glossary, definitions, table of contents in text 
  • Students will write an opinion piece about a topic 
  • Introduce the topic  
  • Hook the readers by writing an introduction which grabs audiences attention 
  • State a strong opinion 
  • Support his or her opinion through examples 
  • Include an action ending to tell reader to go act upon author’s opinion

Students will write poetry

  • Identify words and phrases in poems to suggest strong feelings relating to the 5 senses 
  • Write a variety of poems, including haiku, acrostic, rhyming, concrete, simile, free verse
  • Students will write realistic narratives 
  • Include two or more appropriately sequenced events 
  • Include details regarding what happened 
  • Use temporal words to signal event order 
  • Provide closing 
  • Students will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling 
  • Use correct spelling for high‐frequency sight words, short‐vowel sounds, and topics reviewed in word study 
  • The student will understand that sentences comprised of parts of speech. 
  • Define nouns as a person, place, or thing 
  • Understand use of singular and plural nouns and pronouns 
  • Identify verbs as the action of a sentence 
  • Identify adjectives in a sentence and use them in descriptive writing 
  • The students will apply writing mechanics to their writing 
  • Capitalize the beginning of sentences, proper nouns and the word I 
  • Apply proper ending punctuation 
  • Begin using commas in a series 
  • Begin using quotation marks when writing dialogue 
  • The student will identify complete sentences 
  • Use and properly punctuate statements, questions, and exclamations 
  • The students will print legibly and correctly 
  • Use proper pencil grip 
  • Form upper and lower case letters correctly 
  • Space words and sentences appropriately

Math
Number Bonds

  • Identify parts in a whole 
  • Create number stories to illustrate number bonds 
  • Divide a set of objects into two parts, in different ways 
  • Write number‐bonds for a given number within 100 
  • Find missing part of number‐bond

Numbers to 100

  • Numbers to 100 
  • Order of numbers 
  • Count by tens 
  • Count within 100 by tens 
  • Read and write numerals and number‐words for numbers within 100 
  • State the number which is 1 more than / 10 more than / 1 less than / 10 less than a given number within 10 
  • Compare two numbers within 100 
  • Arrange a group of numbers within 100 in ascending or descending order 
  • Count‐on by ones/tens from a given number 
  • Count‐back by ones/tens from a given number

Addition and Subtraction

  • Making Addition Stories 
  • Other Methods of Addition 
  • Addition within 100 
  • Comprehend the meaning of addition 
  • Associate addition with part‐whole concept 
  • Write the addition sentences using “+” and “=” 
  • Relate number‐bonds to addition sentences to number stories 
  • Use “count on” strategy to add two numbers within 10, one of which is 1, 2, or 3 
  • Practice counting on from 1, 2, or 3 
  • Review number‐pairs  
  • Adding three numbers 
  • Add a 2‐digit number and a 1‐digit number, without renaming 
  • Add a 2‐digit number and a 1‐digit number, using the “make‐10” strategy 
  • Add a 2‐digit number and tens 
  • Add two 2‐digit numbers in two steps, by first adding the tens and then adding the ones 
  • Making Subtraction Stories 
  • Comprehend the meaning of subtraction 
  • Associate subtraction with the part‐whole concept 
  • Make number‐stories for subtraction 
  • Compare addition to subtraction 
  • Write subtraction sentences using “‐“ and “=” 
  • Find missing part of a set using subtraction

Methods of Subtraction

  • Use “take‐away” as a method of subtraction 
  • Relate subtraction facts within 10 to number‐bonds 
  • Write a family of 4 addition and subtraction facts for give number bonds 
  • Recall subtraction facts within 5 
  • Use the “count‐back” strategy to subtract 1, 2, or 3 from a number within 10 
  • Practice counting back 1, 2, or 3 
  • Recognize numbers that differ by 1 or 2 
  • Subtraction within 100 
  • Subtract a 1‐digit number from a 2‐digit number, without renaming 
  • Subtract a 1‐digit number from a 2‐digit number, using the “subtract‐from‐ten” strategy 
  • Subtract tens from a 2‐digit number 
  • Subtract a 2‐digit number from another 2‐digit number in two steps, by first subtracting the tens and then subtracting the ones

Fractions

  • Making halves and quarters 
  • Recognize and name one half of a whole which is divided into 2 equal parts 
  • Recognize and name one quarter of a whole which is divided into 4 equal parts 
  • Recognize halves and quarters 
  • Recognize patterns

Length

  • Compare the lengths of two or more objects 
  • Estimate and measure length in non‐standard units

Weight

  • Compare the weights of two or more objects
  • Estimate and measure weight in non‐standard units 

Geometry

  • Sort and classify 2‐dimensional shapes according to shape, size, or color 
  • Describe or continue a pattern according to one or two attributes such as shape, size, or color 
  • Fit matching pieces together to form a basic shape 
  • Comparing Numbers 
  • Comparing numbers 
  • Comparison by subtraction 
  • Use the language of “more than” and “less than” 
  • Compare two numbers  
  • Compare two numbers by subtractions 
  • Solve picture problems involving comparison by subtraction

Graphs

  • Picture graphs 
  • Make simple picture graphs using one‐to‐one representation 
  • Read and interpret data presented as a picture graph

Time

  • Telling Time 
  • Tell the times on the hour 
  • Sequence events according to time 
  • Tell the times at half past the hour

Money

Bills and Coins

  • Recognize, name, and count coins and bills 
  • Change a coin for an equivalent set of coins of smaller denominations 
  • Change a bill for an equivalent set of bills of smaller denominations 
  • Compare the amount of money in 2 or 3 sets of coins or bills 
  • Shopping 
  • Read the price of an item and prepare payment 
  • Solve simple picture problems involving money within $20

Science
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic

  • Students will learn to use the scientific method to conduct experiments 
  • Students will use questions and inquiry to formulate their own experiments 
  • Students will formulate hypotheses, gather data, and analyze findings 
  • Students will sort and classify according to attributes 
  • Life Processes 
  • Students will explain and show that plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes in their life cycles 
  • Students will identify needs of plants and animals 
  • Students will classify plants and animals by characteristics  
  • Students will identify the characteristics of plants and animals that allow them to survive in specific habitats 
  • Students will explore why animals have developed specific adaptations that demonstrate evolution

Living Systems

  • Students will identify living things as a part of a system of living and nonliving organisms 
  • Students will investigate and understand that environments support a diversity of plants and animals that share limited resources 
  • Students will describe and illustrate a variety of water‐related and dry‐land habitat environments \Students will explore how various environments support living things 
  • Students will investigate how animals adapt to thrive in specific habitats 

Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change

  • Students will describe  how weather and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and habitats 
  • Students will explore and explain the parts of the water cycle 
  • Students will investigate and describe the rock cycle and identification minerals and rock types  
  • Students will investigate how weather conditions and phenomena occur and can be predicted 
  • Students will summarize that night and day are caused by the rotation of the Earth 
  • Students will compare and contrast the types, changes, and patterns of weather
  • Students will use tools to measure and record weather data Matter 
  • Students will observe and define the physical properties of solids, liquids and gasses 
  • Students will investigate how and why phase changes are impacted by heat 

Environmental Awareness

  • Students will define renewable and nonrenewable resources 
  • Students will learn ways to reduce their carbon footprint and protect the environment 
  • Students will investigate how humans affect all living creatures

Social Studies

  • Identify days of the week, seasons, holidays, and use time‐related concepts 
  • Discuss the lives of people associated with holidays in the United States and Africa 
  • Explore cultures of the United States and Africa and distinguish among past, present, and future 

Geography

  • Develop basic map symbols, including references to land, water, cities, and roads;including using cardinal directions on maps 
  • Identify the shapes of the United States and Africa on maps and globes 
  • Examine different kinds of maps that give different kinds of information 
  • Construct and interpret maps of a familiar area 
  • Describe how location, climate, and physical surroundings affect the way people live, including their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation 

Economics

  • Recognize that money may be used to purchase goods and services which people need and/or want 
  • Compare and contrast the coins and paper money of the United States and Africa

Civics

  • Identify need for rules at home, in school, and in the larger world 
  • Apply the traits of a good citizen 
  • Work responsibly as an individual and as a group member

Music
First Grade students meet with their music teacher twice a week and explore music through singing, playing instruments, listening and moving.  Utilizing our Orff instruments, world drums and other percussion instruments, students are challenged to create and perform music from around the globe. First Grade students perform in concerts throughout the school year.

Performance and Production

  • Students will have the opportunity to share their musical knowledge through progressing Orff and Kodaly with do, mi, so and la. 
  • The student will demonstrate rhythmic patterns which contain strong (accented) and weak (unaccented) beats.
  • The student will demonstrate gradual changes in the intensity of musical sound (dynamics). 
  • The student will imitate (echo) and perform rhythm patterns from stick or line notation (iconic notation), while maintaining  the steady beat; also respond appropriately to sounds and silences in patterns clapped, played, or sung by the teacher. 
  • The student will perform simple structured dances. 
  • The student will move in a creative manner in response to music or poetry, and will identify and respond to changes in tempo (speed).

Cultural Context and Music Theory

  • The student will vocally match pitches sung or played, within a 7 note range, and be able to identify high and low sounds. 
  • The student will recognize when music changes from one section to a contrasting section. 
  • The student will distinguish among the singing voices and if the music is accompanied or unaccompanied. 
  • The student will distinguish between the rhythm of the words (melodic rhythm) and the steady beat from aural examples.

Judgment and Criticism

  • The student will show respect for the contributions of self and others in a music setting.

French
The students will identify, name and expand vocabulary learned in Senior Kindergarten such as numbers, colors, basic greetings, family members, animals, food and drinks, parts of the body, feelings, the weather, the days of the week, the months, the seasons, clothes, school items and games.

  • The students will identify and name new vocabulary for sports and games, house, toys and basic verbs 
  • The students will recognize and follow basic classroom commands in French. 
  • The students will communicate with correct pronunciation 
  • The students will be able to listen to and understand a story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement 
  • The students will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink. 
  • The students will be able to ask and answer simple questions in French about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The students will be able to read the songs that they learn in class and the booklets that they write. 
  • The students will use correct noun and adjective agreement. 
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the francophone world. 
  • The student  will celebrate French holidays throughout the year.

Spanish
The student will continue to develop vocabulary learned in Kindergarten such as numbers, colors, basic greetings, family members, animals, parts of the body, feelings, the weather, clothing, days of the week, clothes, and school items.

  • The student will identify and name new vocabulary for the months of the year, seasons, school supplies, pets, community helpers, and basic verbs. 
  • The student will recognize and follow basic classroom commands in Spanish. 
  • The student will communicate with correct pronunciation.  
  • The student will be able to listen to and understand stories with repetition and illustrations used as reinforcement. 
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink.  
  • The student will be able to answer simple questions in Spanish about each vocabulary topic.  
  • The student will be able to read simple books in Spanish. 
  • The student will use correct noun and adjective agreement.  
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the Hispanic world. 
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the year.

Art
Creating: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • The student will recognize and discuss various solutions to a single art problem choice of materials, choice of subject, design/size. 
  • The student will use the sense of vision, touch, and hearing as inspirations for works of art: music, color, design. 
  • The student will identify and use: Primary colors, Secondary colors, warm and cool colors; Line and line variations zigzag, dotted, wavy, spiral; Shape geometric and organic; Patterns alternating and repeating. 
  • The student will create works of art inspired by spoken and written stories.
  • The student will create art from real and imaginary sources of inspiration.
  • The student will use past experiences and simulated situations as subject matter in works of art.
  • The student will demonstrate the ability to recognize size relationships foreground, middle ground, background.
  • The student will develop eye/hand coordination by drawing and constructing.
  • The student will observe and depict people in a work of art.
  • The student will demonstrate motor skills by weaving, tearing, and folding. 
  • The student will use clay to create pinch pots. 
  • The student will use a ruler as a straight edge.

Presenting: Select, Analyze, and interpret art for presentation.

  • The student will discuss the reasons why works of art have value.

Responding: Perceive and analyze artistic work.

  • The student will identify and describe works of art that communicate feelings, ideas, and information.
  • The student will learn how other cultures use art as expression.
  • The student will discuss why viewers may have different responses to works of art.
  • The student will view works of art and describe similarities and differences between them.
  • The student will respond orally to works of art with references to primary colors; line; texture; shape; and pattern.
  • The student will describe and discuss ideas and emotions communicated in works of art.

Connecting: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art.

  • The student will recognize and describe how art is an integral part of one’s own culture religion; stories, tales, myths; Historical events.

Physical Education
Movement Concepts

  • Awareness of personal space, general space, and boundaries while moving in different directions and at high, medium, and low levels in space. 
  • Speed 
  • Levels 
  • Space Pathways

Body Management 

  • Balance 

Locomotor Movement

  • Hop 
  • Gallop 
  • Running 
  • Sliding, and skipping

Manipulative Skills 

  • Catching 
  • Throwing a ball 
  • Volley (Underhand) 
  • Dribbling/Ball control with feet 
  • Kicking 
  • Passing and receiving with feet

Rhythmic Skills

  • Create or imitate movement in response to rhythms and music. 
  • Fitness Knowledge 
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance

Flexibility 

  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Aquatics 
  • Self-Responsibility 
  • Participate willingly in new physical activities. 
  • Identify and demonstrate acceptable responses to challenges, successes, and failures in physical activity.

Social Interaction 

  • Demonstrate the characteristics of sharing and cooperation in physical activity. 
  • Invite others to use equipment or apparatus before repeating a turn. 
  • Group Dynamics 
  • Identify and demonstrate the attributes of an effective partner in physical activity. 
  • Identify and demonstrate effective practices for working with a group without interfering with others.

Group Dynamics

  • Identify and demonstrate the attributes of an effective partner in physical activity.
  • Identify and demonstrate effective practices for working with a group without interfering with others.
Grade 2

Language Arts
Oral Language

The student will use effective listening skills

  • Use eye contact, ask questions and summarize what is being said 
  • Listen to and follow multi‐step directions 
  • The student will use effective oral communication skills  
  • Retell events in order with accuracy 
  • Participate in different  group discussions and class meetings 
  • Present learned information orally 
  • Engage audience using voice, eye contact and visual media  
  • Ask and respond to questions to clarify, check for understanding or move discussion forward  


Word Study

The student will apply word study skills in reading and writing

  • Identify and apply complex consonant blends 
  • Identify and apply silent letters in long vowel patterns 
  • Identify and apply the k, ck and ke endings 
  • Identify and apply r‐influenced vowel patterns 
  • Identify and apply common long vowel patterns 
  • Identify and apply diphthongs and ambiguous vowels 
  • Recognize the sound patterns and meanings of homophones and homographs 
  • Read and spell common high‐frequency sight words


Reading

The student will read orally with fluency and expression

  • Use intonation that correctly corresponds with punctuation 
  • Adjust their reading speed to aid in comprehension
  • The student will read and comprehend a variety of genres including fiction novels and nonfiction texts  

Fiction 

  • Set a purpose for reading 
  • Identify fiction genres such as realistic fiction, historical fiction, mystery, folktales, fantasy 
  • Make, confirm and revise predictions throughout reading 
  • Identify cause and effect relationships 
  • Summarize and identify the main idea from the details 
  • Retell events in a story in order  
  • Identify story elements such as character, setting, problem and solution 
  • Identify character traits using evidence from the text  
  • Form opinions about characters 
  • Differentiate between the beginning, middle and end of a story  
  • Make connections from what they are reading to their lives, the world or other texts 
  • Recognize patterns and discuss similarities and differences between book  series  
  • Recommend books with supporting reasons 

Non‐fiction 

  • Identify the author’s purpose 
  • Identify a purpose for reading 
  • Identify and use text features such as captions, bold print, headings, pictures, index and glossaries to inform reading 
  • Draw own conclusions based on informational texts 
  • Determine facts from opinion 
  • Compare and contrast elements within a text or between texts 
  • Form opinions using evidence from texts 
  • Use learned information to prepare a presentation
  • The student will apply word‐analysis skills when reading 
  • Use context clues to derive meaning from unknown words 
  • Decode multisyllabic words using knowledge of consonant digraphs, vowel patterns, and  consonant blends 
  • Apply phonics and word study skills to decode unknown words


Writing

The students will develop their writing pieces through a process 

  • Generate ideas for writing  
  • Create a plan before writing 
  • Write with a beginning, middle and end 
  • Revise for clarity 
  • Edit for appropriate spelling, capitalization and punctuation 
  • Publish for sharing 
  • The students will write personal narratives  
  • Examine mentor texts for inspiration  
  • Create small moment stories using descriptive language 
  • Summarize events using ordinal words and transition words 
  • Include information about who, what, where, when, why and how  
  • Include a beginning, middle and end
  • The students will write to create stories 
  • Examine mentor texts for inspiration 
  • Develop characters using character traits  
  • Create an exciting beginning by using action and dialogue  
  • Describe their setting using sensory language 
  • Develop a clear problem and solution 
  • Use clarifying details 
  • Use dialogue, action, and feelings to enrich stories  
  • The students will write to express an opinion or persuade 
  • Examine author’s craft and apply style and techniques in their own writing 
  • Introduce a topic and state opinion 
  • Provide multiple reasons to support opinion 
  • Write a conclusion  
  • The students will write to inform 
  • Examine mentor texts for inspiration  
  • Create non‐fictions pieces such as autobiographies, biographies, research pieces, and how‐to books 
  • Introduce topic and set purpose 
  • Support the topic with facts, details and description 
  • Write a conclusion 
  • The students will identify and use correctly the parts of speech in their written language 
  • Identify nouns and verbs in a sentence 
  • Identify adjectives in a sentence and use them in descriptive writing 
  • Identify adverbs in a sentence and use them in descriptive writing 
  • Identify pronouns and apply them in writing
  • The students will apply writing mechanics to their writing 
  • Capitalize the beginning of sentences, proper nouns and the word I 
  • Apply proper ending punctuation 
  • Apply apostrophes correctly in contractions and possessive nouns 
  • Use commas in a series 
  • Begin using quotation marks when writing dialogue 
  • The students will print legibly and correctly 
  • Use proper pencil grip 
  • Form upper and lower case letters correctly 
  • Space words and sentences appropriately 
  • Begin learning the cursive alphabet  
  • The students will use technology to create and publish writing when appropriate


Math
Place Value
● Read and write numbers within the thousands.
● Relate each digit in a 4‐digit number to its place value.
● Compare and order numbers within 1,000.
● Complete number patterns within 1,000.

Addition and Subtraction
● Recall addition and subtraction facts up to 20 with speed and accuracy.
● Understand the meaning of addition and subtraction (whole‐part‐part).
● Add and subtract numbers mentally within 100.
● Add and subtract 1’s, 10’s and 100’s to numbers mentally within 1,000.
● Subtract mentally from 100
● Add and subtract numbers within 1,000 using different strategies.
● Solve 1‐step and 2‐step word problems involving addition and subtraction.
● Use the part‐whole and comparison models to represent word problems.
● Understand and use inverse relationship between addition and subtraction.
● Compare numbers by using subtraction to find the difference.
● Solve 1‐step and 2‐step word problems involving addition and subtraction.

Multiplication and Division
● Use repeated addition and arrays to multiply
● Use sharing and grouping to divide.
● Relate multiplication to division
● Multiply and divide by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10.
● Use repeated subtraction to divide and find the remainder.
● Solve 1‐step word problems involving multiplication and division

Fractions
● Recognize and name fractions of a whole.
● Make a whole with a fraction.
● Compare and order fractions with a common numerator.
● Recognize and name fractions of a set.

Length
● Compare and measure length in non‐standard units.
● Compare and estimate length in meters, centimeter, yards, feet and inches.
● Compare measurements made in different units.
●  Add and subtract lengths within the same unit.

Area and Perimeter
● Find the area of figures in square units.
● Understand that figures with different shapes can have the same area.
● Find the perimeter of a figure given the lengths of the sides

Geometry
● Identify and describe 2‐dimensional shapes.
● Identify and describe 3‐dimensional objects (faces, edges and vertices).
● Combine shapes to form compound shapes

Time
● Read and write time to nearest 5 minute mark.
● Find the duration of a time interval.
● Solve word problems involving time intervals.
● Understand relationships of time (years, months, days, weeks, hours and seconds)

Money
● Count sets of bills and coins to $10.00
● Recognize, read, and write decimal notation for money.
● Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Science
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning and Logic: Students learn to use the scientific method
○ Formulate questions
○ create hypotheses
○ collect and record data
○ analyze data
○ form conclusions

Life Processes

  • Students will define the parts of a plant and their purposes 
  • Identify the root hairs on the roots as where water enters a plant and that roots anchor a plant into the ground 
  • Identify the stem  as where the water flows up to the rest of the plant  
  • Identify the leaves as where photosynthesis takes place 
  • Identify the parts of a flower as the petals, stamen, pistil, ovary 
  • Define the process of photosynthesis  
  • Define the process of pollination and fertilization that occurs to produce a seed  
  • Investigate plant adaptations that help them to survive in the conditions of their habitat 
  • Examine carnivorous plants 
  • Students will classify animals as either vertebrates or invertebrates 
  • Students will classify vertebrates as a mammal, bird, fish, reptile or amphibian  
  • Students will investigate physical characteristics of animals in relation to adaptations 
  • Students will define behavioral adaptations that animals have to help them survive in a specific habitat


Living Systems

  • Students will examine the characteristics of various habitats around the world, including the rainforest, tundra, temperate forest, savanna, desert, ocean, and wetlands 
  • Students will make connections between climate, geography and habitat 
  • Students will investigate food chains that are specific to each habitat  
  • Students will examine food pyramids and how the proportion of plants, herbivores and carnivores needs to be in a healthy ecosystem 


Matter

  • Students will observe and define the physical properties of solids, liquids and gasses 
  • Students will investigate how and why phase changes are impacted by heat 
  • Students will identify an atom as the smallest bit of matter 
  • Students will define a molecule as atoms linked together 
  • Students will examine the parts of an atom: protons, neutrons and electrons 
  • Force, Motion, and Energy 
  • Students will investigate sound energy 
  • Recognize sound as a vibration of molecules and learn how sound travels 
  • Differentiate between pitch and frequency 
  • Investigate how sound travels through different states of matter 
  • Students will investigate light energy 
  • Examine how wavelength effects light color 
  • Define refraction 
  • Define reflection 
  • Define absorption 
  • Students will investigate heat energy 
  • Examine how heat is created by the movement of molecules 
  • Identify causes of heat 
  • Examine the relationship between friction and heat 
  • Define conduction and insulation and identify materials that are conductors and materials that are insulators 
  • Observe how and why matter changes size in relation to heat 
  • Students will investigate electricity 
  • Define electricity as the flow of electrons  
  • Identify the parts of a simple circuit 
  • Build a simple circuit  
  • Investigate how insulators and conductors impact circuits  
  • Examine renewable (including wind, solar, hydro,geothermal,biomass and nuclear) and nonrenewable sources of electricity (fossil fuels)  


Environmental Issues

  • Students will define renewable and nonrenewable resources 
  • Students will learn about ways to reduce their carbon footprint and protect the environment 
  • Students will study endangered species around the world  
  • Define cause of their endangerment  
  • Identify how they fit into their food chain 
  • Investigate physical and behavioral adaptations that help them survive in their habitat  
  • Research ways that humans can help species grow in population


Social Studies

History

  • The student will learn to use primary and secondary sources to locate, gather and process information from each civilization
  • The student will investigate ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, and Ancient Greece 
  • The student will make connections between ancient and modern civilizations 
  • The student will compare and contrast the religions, architecture, inventions, number system, government, and written language of each civilization
  • The student will explore major symbols or figures from each civilization


Geography

  • The student will use the different parts of a map (compass rose, legend, key) appropriately 
  • The student will examine different types of maps that to learn different information 
  • The student will construct and interpret maps of a familiar area 
  • The student will describe how location, climate, and physical surroundings affect the way people live, including their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation 
  • The student will identify the geography of each civilization (Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece) using maps and globes 
  • The student will interpret and construct maps and/or charts relating to each ancient civilization


Economics

  • The student will understand natural resources and human resources 
  • The student will distinguish between the use of barter and the use of money in the exchange for goods and services 
  • The student will explain that limited resources require people to make choices about producing and consuming goods and services 
  • The student will compare and contrast economic systems between each civilization


Civics

  • The student will examine the political structure of each civilization and compare and contrast the system to modern systems of government


French

  • Review and expand the vocabulary learned in first grade such as such as numbers, colors, greetings, family members, animals, food and drinks, parts of the body, feelings, the weather, the days of the week, the months, the seasons, clothes, school items, games, house, toys and basic verbs
  • The students will identify and name new vocabulary for the French alphabet, table setting vocabulary,  adjectives, hobbies, sports and activities, expressions of courtesy (using Vous), numbers 0­69/Counting with euros, vocabulary for going shopping  
  • The students will recognize and follow classroom commands in French. 
  • The students will communicate with correct pronunciation  
  • The students will be able to listen to and understand a story with repetitions and illustrations used as reinforcement. 
  • The students will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink. 
  • The students will be able to ask and answer simple questions in French about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The students will be able to read the songs that they learn in class, the booklets that they write, and their individual descriptions of the world around them.  
  • The students will use correct noun and adjective agreement. 
  • The students will use verb Etre and Avoir in context. 
  • The students will use simple regular­er verbs in the infinitive form in context with singular subject pronouns. 
  • The students will be able to express wishes using Je voudrais...(I would like) 
  • The students will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the francophone world.
  • The students will celebrate French holidays throughout the year.


Spanish

  • The student will continue to develop previously learned vocabulary such as numbers, colors, greetings, family members, animals, parts of the body, feelings, weather, days of the week, months of the year, seasons, clothes, school items, and basic verbs.
  • The student will identify and name new vocabulary that includes classroom objects, house, table setting, adjectives, sports and activities, expressions of courtesy, numbers 0­100, telling time to the hour and half hour, and wild animals. 
  • The student will learn the Spanish alphabet. 
  • The student will recognize and follow classroom commands in Spanish. 
  • The student will communicate with correct pronunciation. 
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink. 
  • The student will be able to listen to and understand stories with repetition and illustrations used as reinforcement. 
  • The student will be able to ask and answer simple questions in Spanish about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The student will be able to read simple books in Spanish and write individual descriptions of the world around them.
  • The student will use correct noun and adjective agreement. 
  • he student will begin to conjugate commonly used verbs in first and third person. 
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the Hispanic world.
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the year.


Music

  • Second Grade students meet with their music teacher twice a week and explore music through singing, playing instruments, listening and moving.  Building on musicianship skills from previous years, it is our intent that each second grader begin transforming into their own creative, unique musician.  Utilizing our Orff instruments, world drums and other percussion instruments, students are challenged to create and perform music from around the globe. Second Grade students perform in concerts throughout the school year. 


Performance and Production

  • Students will have the opportunity to share their musical knowledge through Orff and Kodaly with entire scale (do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do).
  • The student will perform, with a steady beat, simple rhythmic patterns from traditional notation, including simple repeated patterns (ostinati).  
  • The student will identify and respond to gradual changes in tempo.
  • The student will play single chord songs on Orff instruments to accompany group singing. 
  • The student will create music to enhance songs, short stories, and poems.
  • The student will match locomotor movements to given patterns and tempi.
  • The students will clap the rhythm of the words (melodic rhythm) to songs and chants.


Cultural Context and Music Theory

  • The student will identify two simple contrasting parts of a musical composition (AB part form).  
  • The student will identify four orchestral families (strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion) from aural and visual examples.  Selected instruments will be identified by sight and sound. 
  • The student will identify notated melodic patterns which move upward, downward, or t emain the same.


Judgment and Criticism

  • The student will show respect for the contributions of self and others in a music setting.


Art
Creating: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • The student will incorporate unanticipated results of art making into works of art 
  • The student will use literary sources to generate works of art 
  • The student will identify and use Elements and principles of design‐ color, line, shape, form: 
  • Primary, secondary, warm, cool, intermediate/analogous colors 
  • Shapes­ geometric and organic 
  • 3-Dimensional forms­ cube, cylinder, sphere, pyramid, and cone 
  • The student will communicate an environmental or historical theme in a work of art 
  • The student will create a sewn project. 
  • The student will depict objects in proportion within a work of art. 
  • The student will collaborate with others to create a work of art. 
  • The student will create a 3-Dimensional work of art. 
  • The student will make a work of art by manipulating clay. 
  • The student will compare and contrast organic and geometric shapes in works of art. 
  • The student will create a portrait.
  • The students will use a ruler as a straight edge and measuring tool.


Presenting: Select, Analyze, and interpret art for presentation.

  • The student will express opinions with supporting statements regarding works of art (What do you like and why) 
  • The student will distinguish between natural objects and objects made by human in the environment.


Responding: Perceive and analyse artistic work

  • The student will identify symbols that various cultures use to represent common themes. 
  • The student will identify art from other cultures, including ancient Egypt. 
  • The student will express opinions with supporting statements regarding works of art (What do you like and why) 
  • The student will distinguish between natural objects and objects made by human in the environment. 
  • The student will discuss the meanings and feelings evoked by works of art. 
  • The student will discuss the ways that the art of a culture reflects its people’s attitudes and beliefs‐ mythology and storytelling.


Connecting: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art.

  • The student will identify and use a variety of sources for art ideas, including nature, people, visuals, imagination, and resource materials. 
  • The student will incorporate unanticipated results of art making into works of art 
  • The student will use literary sources to generate works of art 
  • The student will communicate an environmental or historical theme in a work of art


Physical Education

  • Personal responsibility and feedback
  • Rules and safety 
  • Movement concepts:
  1. Space, Pathways, Shapes and Levels 
  2. Speed, Directions, and Force
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Flexibility
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance
  • Manipulative skills:
  1. Overhand Throwing a ball
  2. Catching
  3. Volley (Underhand)
  4. Dribbling/Ball control with feet
  5. Kicking
  6. Passing and receiving with feet
  • Fitness knowledge
  • Self-Responsibility:
  1. Participate in a variety of group settings (e.g., partners, small groups, large groups) without interfering with others.
  2. Accept responsibility for one’s own behavior in a group activity.
  • Social Interaction:
  1. Acknowledge one’s opponent or partner before, during, and after an activity or game and give positive feedback on the opponent’s or partner’s performance. 
  2. Encourage others by using verbal and nonverbal communication.
  3. Demonstrate respect for self, others, and equipment during physical activities.
  4. Demonstrate how to solve a problem with another person during physical activity.
  • Group Dynamics :
  1. Participate positively in physical activities that rely on cooperation. 
Grade 3

Language Arts
Oral Language

The student will use effective listening skills
● Active audience member when listening to presentations and reports
○ Listen to and record information
○ Ask related questions of presenter
○ Summarize the presentation
○ Provide feedback and opinion to presenter

The student will use effective oral communication skills in a variety of settings
● Use subject‐related information and vocabulary
● Seek ideas and opinions of others
● Support opinions with personal experience or documentation
● Use grammatically correct language and specific vocabulary to communicate ideas

Word Study
The student will apply word study skills in reading and writing  
● Identify and apply plural endings s and es
● Identify and use irregular plurals 
● Identify and apply inflectional endings for ed, and ing
● Identify and use compound words
● Identify open and closed syllables
● Identify and apply vowel patterns in accented syllables
● Identify and apply final unaccented syllables
● Recognize the sound patterns and meaning of two‐syllable homophones and homographs.
● Identify special consonants in two‐syllable words
● Identify and apply simple prefixes and suffixes
● Use word‐reference materials, including the glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus, from texts, apposition; and multiple meanings of words
● Use correct spelling for high‐frequency words

The student will develop a vocabulary using words garnered from reading material in class
● Develop definitions without the use of a dictionary
● Use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words
● Explain words with multiple meanings
● Draw pictures that represent the words
● Write antonyms and synonyms and homonyms
● Make personal connections with each word, as well as write sentences
● Determine missing words from sentences
● Practice vocabulary using analogies

Reading
The student will read fiction and nonfiction with fluency and accuracy
● Use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words
● Explain words with multiple meanings
● Use knowledge of word origins; synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms; and homophones
● Use word‐reference materials, including the glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fiction
● Form predictions before reading
● Identify story elements
● Describe how the choice of language, dialect, setting, and information contributes to the story’s meaning
● Compare and contrast different genres of fiction
● Identify major events and supporting details
● Form connections between text and previously read materials, and personal experiences 
● Visualize what is happening in the text
● Infer meaning from text
● Ask questions about the text
● Reread challenging parts of text for better understanding
● Compare the use of fact and fantasy in historical fiction with other forms of literature
● Describe the relationship between text and previously read materials

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction
● Use text organizers, such as type, headings, and graphics, to predict and categorize
● Formulate questions that might be answered in the selection
● Draw conclusions using information from texts
● Summarize content of selection
● Describe relationship between content and previously learned concepts or skills
● Identify new information gained from reading 
● Distinguish fact from opinion and cause and effect
● Identify the author’s purpose

The student will demonstrate comprehension of information resources to research a topic
● Construct questions about a topic
● Collect information, using print and online resources 
● Evaluate and synthesize information

The student will learn how to use reading comprehension strategies and skills
● Ask questions to develop a deeper understanding of the text 
● Reread to clarify meaning
● Recall information and experiences with the topic
● Predict what will happen next in fictional pieces
● Recognize appropriate reading speed within the text
● Summarize periodically to maintain memory of story elements
● Identify the author’s point of view
● Maintain the order of events
● Distinguish fact from opinion
● Understand details to develop a main idea
● Distinguish between cause and effect and between fact and opinion
● Compare and contrast elements within the story and with previously read material

Writing
The student will write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons
● Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons
● Provide reasons that support the opinion
● Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons
● Provide a concluding statement or section

The student will write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
● Introduce a topic and group related information together
● Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details
● Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information
● Provide a concluding statement or section

The student will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences
● Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally
● Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations
● Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order
● Provide a sense of closure

The student will identify and use correctly in written and spoken language the parts of speech
● Identify nouns, including common and proper, and write them correctly in sentences 
● Apply word study skills to write singular, plural, and possessive nouns
● Identify and spell action, main, and helping verbs, along with their correct tenses
● Write the past tense of irregular verbs, recognize the forms of the verb be
● Define adjectives and locate the nouns they describe
● Use the articles a, an, and the correctly, as well as forms of the words good and bad
● Use the correct form of the adjective when comparing two or more persons, places, or 
● Identify and use correctly in written and spoken language subject, object, and possessive 
● Define adverbs and the verbs they describe
● Use the correct forms of good and well

The student will understand and correctly use the mechanics of capitalization and punctuation
● Master use of beginning sentences with capital letters and ending with proper end marks
● Apply rules of capitalization to proper nouns, applicable abbreviations (including two‐letter state abbreviations)
● Use commas in series, dates, addresses, and direct address.
● Identify direct and indirect quotation in sentences
● Correctly punctuate quotations

The student will understand parts of a sentence
● Distinguish among complete sentences, fragments, and run‐ons
● Identify complete and simple subjects and predicates
● Recognize, write, and punctuate properly statements, questions, commands 
● Construct simple and compound sentences

The student will write legibly
● Master their letter formation and spacing for printed writing 
● Learn to write all lowercase letters in cursive

Math
Place Value

● Read and write numbers less than 10,000.
● Relate each digit in a 5‐digit number to its place value.
● Compare and order numbers within 10,000.

Addition and Subtraction
● Understand the terms sum and difference.
● Solve 1‐step and 2‐step word problems involving addition and subtraction.
● Use the part‐whole and comparison models to represent word problems.
● Add and subtract numbers up to 10,000 using the formal algorithm. 
● Learn strategies for mentally adding a 2‐digit number close to a 10 or 100. 

Multiplication and Division
● Multiply and divide with factors 0‐10.
● Solve 1‐step and 2‐step word problems involving multiplication and division. 
● Use part‐whole and comparison models to represent word problems. 
● Understand the terms product, quotient, and remainder. 
● Multiply and divide numbers within 1000 by 2‐9 using the formal algorithm. 
● Learn mental math strategies for multiplication.

Fractions
● Recognize and name fractions of a whole.
● Make a whole with a fraction. 
● Compare and order fractions with a common numerator and common denominator. 
● Recognize and name equivalent fractions.
● Find equivalent fractions using multiplication and division. 
● Find the simplest form of a fraction. 
● Compare and order simple fractions.

Length
● Estimate and measure lengths in meters and centimeters.
● Recognize kilometers as units of length. 
● Convert between meters and centimeters, kilometers and meters. 
● Estimate and measure in yards, feet and inches 
● Convert between yards and feet. 
● Recognize miles as a unit of measurement. 
● Convert between yards and feet, feet and inches. 
● Add and subtract lengths in yards and feet, feet and inches and in miles

Area and Perimeter
● Find the area of figures in square units. 
● Understand that figures with different shapes can have the same area. 
● Find the area of figures in square centimeters, inches, meters, feet and yards. 
● Compare relative areas in square centimeters, inches, meters, feet and yards.. 
● Find the perimeter of a figure given the lengths of the sides

Geometry
● Identify angles 
● Relate the size of a angle to the degree of turning
● Count the angles in polygonal shapes 
● Classify angles as less than, equal to, or greater than a right angle

Time
● Read and write time to 1 minute. 
● Find the duration of a time interval. 
● Solve word problems involving time intervals. 
● Convert between hours and minutes. minutes and seconds, years and months, weeks and days. 
● Add and subtract time in hours and minutes. 
● Measure time in seconds

Money
● Count sets of bills and coins.
● Recognize, read, and write decimal notation for money.
● Add and subtract money within $100. 
● Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of money

Science
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic
● Students will use the scientific method to formulate, create, collect, and analyze data
● Students will plan and conduct investigations in which predictions and observations are made; questions are developed to formulate hypotheses; and data are gathered, charted, and graphed Living Systems
● Students will investigate and understand the natural processes and human interactions that affect water quality
● Students will investigate how humans affect water quality
● Students will describe the features of a watershed
● Students will identify living insects, worms, mollusks, and crustaceans in a stream
● Students will monitor and analyze water using field equipment and technology

Interrelationships in Earth and Space Systems
● Students will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system and the 
relationships among the various bodies that comprise it including the Sun, Moon, Earth, and other planets
● Students will investigate the role of gravitational forces on the Earth and Moon
● Students will identify common constellations and their historical and mythological connections

Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change
● Students will investigate and understand patterns of natural events (day and night, seasonal changes, phases of the Moon)
● Students will investigate and understand the relationships among the Earth, Moon, and Sun, including their motions and the relationship between the Earth’s tilt and its seasons
● Students will investigate and understand how weather conditions and phenomena occur and can be predicted
● Students will investigate measuring the weather and meteorological tools (air pressure – barometer, wind speed –anemometer, rainfall – rain gauge, and temperature – thermometer).
● Students will investigate weather phenomena (fronts and air masses)

Matter
● Students will investigate and understand that objects are made of materials that can be described by their physical and chemical properties
● Students will investigate acids, bases, and mixtures 
● Students will investigate and explain that different materials, when combined, produce different results 

Force, Motion, and Energy
● Students will investigate and construct models of simple machines including levers, screws, 
pulleys, wheels and axles, inclined planes, and wedges and describe how they function

Social Studies

History
● Compare and contrast historical periods
● Define the importance of ships and sailing to the Vikings
● Discuss the motivation and travels of Spanish explorers
● Identify European explorers and areas discovered during the Age of Exploration
● Understand that a land bridge once connected Asia to North America
● Examine the Inuit people and how they migrated to North America
● Explore how America’s first settlers divided into many groups and spread throughout North and South America.
● Classify the accomplishments and way of life of many of the major Native American groups 
● Identify reasons for the struggle between Native Americans and European Americans and understand how the relations between European explorers and Native Americans affected future settlers in the New World
● Understand reasons why the early settlers came to America
● Identify three colonial regions: New England, the Middle Colonies and the Southern Colonies and understand daily life in the different regions of the colonies
● Recognize the injustice and hardships of slaves and indentured servants on plantations 
● Identify leaders in colonial history.

World Geography

American Geography
● Define global features including landforms
● Recognize the differences among continents, countries, states and cities
● Identify the United States’ different regions and the states that comprise them, as well as 

understand why U.S. states have a distinct shape
● Interpret and create charts, graphs, and scales

Economics
● Explain how society uses natural and human and capital resources in the production of goods and services
● Recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything they want, they 

specialize in what they do best and trade for the rest
● Identify examples of making an economic choice and explain the idea of opportunity cost

Civics
● Recognize that Americans are a people of diverse ethnic origins, customs, and traditions, who are united by the basic principles of respect for individual rights and freedoms

French

  • Review and expand the vocabulary learned in second grade such as such as numbers, colors, greetings, family members, animals, food and drinks, parts of the body, feelings, the weather, the days of the week, the months, the seasons, clothes, school items, games, house, toys and verbs ,the French alphabet, table setting vocabulary,  adjectives, hobbies, sports and activities, expressions of courtesy (using Vous), numbers 0­79/Counting with euros, vocabulary for going shopping 
  • The students will learn vocabulary for food and drinks (meals), The rooms and places in the school,  clothes and accessories /travel, verbs (infinitive and conjugated with singular pronouns), sports and favorite games, musical instruments (Verb Jouer) , physical descriptions of people 
  • The students will recognize and follow classroom commands in French. 
  • The students will communicate with correct pronunciation 
  • The students will be able to create a story with acquired vocabulary and structure. 
  • The students will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink.  
  • The students will be able to ask and answer simple questions in French about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The students will be able to read the songs that they learn in class, the booklets that they write, and their individual descriptions of the world around them.  
  • The students will use correct noun and adjective agreement. 
  • The students will use verb Etre and Avoir in context. 
  • The students will use possessive adjectives ton, ta, tes, son, sa, ses in context. 
  • The students will use simple regular­er verbs in the infinitive form in context with singular subject pronouns. 
  • The students will use simple regular­er verbs in the present tense with singular subject  pronouns.
  • The students will write pen pal letters using acquired vocabulary and structures 
  • The students will be able to ask wishes using Qu’est­ce que tu aimes manger, boire, porter?(What do you like to eat, drink, wear?) Qu’est­ce que tu veux? (What do you want?)when talking to their peers or pen pals 
  • The students will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the francophone world.
  • The students will celebrate French holidays throughout the year.


Spanish
The student will continue to develop previously learned vocabulary such as numbers,colors, greetings, family members, animals, parts of the body, feelings, weather, days of the week, months of the year, seasons, clothes, school supplies and classroom objects, Spanish alphabet, house, table setting,  adjectives, sports and activities, expressions of courtesy, numbers to 100, telling time, and animals.

  • The student will learn vocabulary for food and drink, places in the school and subjects of  study, extreme weather conditions, commonly used verbs, physical descriptions of people, rain forest animals, and geography of Hispanic countries.
  • The student will recognize and follow classroom commands in Spanish.
  • The student will communicate with correct pronunciation.
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink.
  • The student will use correct noun and adjective agreement.
  • The student will be able to ask and answer simple questions in Spanish about each vocabulary topic.
  • The student will be able to write a paragraph using acquired vocabulary and correct sentence structure.
  • The student will be able to read a chapter book in Spanish.
  • The student will be able to conjugate commonly used verbs.
  • The student will write pen pal letters using acquired vocabulary and correct sentence structure.
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the Hispanic world.
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the year.


Art
Creating: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • The student will identify innovative solutions used by artists to solve visual problems.  
  • The student will use various art processes and techniques to produce works of art. 
  • The student will identify and use: tints and shades, value, warm and cool colors; positive and negative space; balance, symmetry, and asymmetry; pattern making through repetition 
  • The student will create the illusion of depth on a 2D surface using overlapping, size variation, and placement in the picture plane. 
  • The student will identify and use foreground, middle ground, and background in 2D. 
  • The student will create a work of art in clay reflecting Native American Pottery, using bas­relief sculpture. 
  • The student will create a work of art in clay using the coil method. 
  • The student will create repeating patterns using flip and rotation.


Presenting: Select, Analyze, and interpret art for presentation.

  • The student will use sketches and take notes to document thought processes with creating works of art.  
  • The students will demonstrate an understanding of symbolic meanings by incorporating symbols in a work of art. 
  • The student will discuss how history, culture, and the visual arts influence each other. 
  • The student will identify works of art that reflect times, places and cultures. 
  • The student will discuss why works of art have been interpreted in different ways throughout history. 
  • The student will describe the problem-­solving process involved in producing personal works of art using appropriate art  vocabulary. 
  • The student will discuss the difference between art and artifacts using appropriate art vocabulary. 
  • The student will categorize works of art by subject matter­ portrait, landscape, still life, narrative. 


Responding: Perceive and analyse artistic work

  • The student will categorize works of art by subject matter­ portrait, landscape, still life, narrative. 
  • The student will discuss how criteria used to value art vary from one culture to another. 
  • The student will examine the relationship between beauty and function in a culture’s artifacts. 
  • The student will develop and describe personal reasons for valuing works of art. 


Connecting: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art.

  • The student will develop and research art ideas from alternative sources, including prints (visuals), stories, and technology. 
  • The student will use sketches and take notes to document thought processes with creating works of art. 
  • The student will create a work of art incorporating written language and visual interpretation.


Music

The objectives in 3rd Grade Music class is for students to:

  • Show enjoyment
  • Move/dance musically
  • Sing freely
  • Show appropriate sense of musical “time” 
  • Participate fully in performance activities 
  • Learn Treble Clef for Beginning Recorder 
  • Learn simple rhythms


Physical Education

  • Personal responsibility and feedback
  • Rules and safety
  • Movement concepts 
  1. Space, Pathways, Shapes and Levels
  2. Speed, Directions, and Force 
  3. Chase, flee, and move away from others in a constantly changing environment. 
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance 
  • Flexibility
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance 
  • Manipulative skills
  1. Basic Gymnastics Skills 
  2. Catching and Throwing in Game Situation 
  3. Prerequisite Sports Skills for Group and Individual Sports
  • Fitness knowledge

Self-Responsibility

  1. Set a personal goal to improve a motor skill and work toward that goal in non-school time. 
  2. List the benefits of following and the risks of not following safety procedures and rules associated with physical activity.

Social Interaction

  1. Demonstrate respect for individual differences in physical abilities. 
  2. Use appropriate cues for movement and positive words of encouragement in physical activities.

Group Dynamics Group Dynamics

  1. Work in pairs or small groups to achieve an agreed-upon goal.
Grade 4

Language Arts
Oral Language

The student will use effective oral communication skills in a variety of settings

  • Resolve conflict 
  • Develop an argument to support a point of view 
  • Engage in a dialogue about ethics and moral issues and appropriately share personal values 
  • To share information in front of a group 


Word Study

The student will continue to develop skills to determine pronunciation and meanings of unfamiliar words in reading material.

  • Apply word study skills already learned 
  • Use correct spelling for frequently‐used words 
  • Use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words 
  • Explain words with multiple meanings 
  • Use knowledge of word origins and structure; synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms; apposition; and multiple meanings of words
  • Use word‐reference materials, including the glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus, from texts, software, and online resources


The student will develop a vocabulary using words garnered from reading material in class and other teacher‐created lists.

  • Develop definitions without the use of a dictionary 
  • Draw pictures that represent the words 
  • Write antonyms and synonyms 
  • Make personal connections with each word, as well as write sentences 
  • Determine missing words from sentences 
  • Practice vocabulary using analogies 
  • Apply word knowledge and mechanics rules to complete “sentence stems” 
  • Differentiate and incorporate into writing literal and figurative meanings of words


Reading

The student will read fiction and nonfiction with fluency and accuracy 

  • Use context clues to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words 
  • Use knowledge of root words, prefixes, homophones and suffixes 
  • Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts 
  • Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and other word‐reference materials


The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fiction

  • Distinguish the various fictional literary genres 
  • Describe character development and change 
  • Make, confirm and revise predictions while reading 
  • Identify main idea and supporting details 
  • Identify the author’s purpose and the story’s theme 
  • Describe the development of plot and explain how conflicts are resolved 
  • Explore various forms of  poetry 
  • Describe how an author’s choice of vocabulary and style contributes to the quality and enjoyment of selections


The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction

  • Use text organizers, such as type, headings, and graphics, to predict and categorize information
  • Identify structural patterns found in nonfiction
  • locate information to support opinions, predictions, and conclusions 
  • Skim materials to develop a general overview of content and to locate specific information 
  • Identify new information gained from reading


The student will apply knowledge of reading comprehension strategies and skills

  • Set reading goals by browsing the text and recalling prior information and experiences 
  • Connect reading to personal experiences, other texts, or information about the world 
  • Visualize what is happening in the text, relying less on pictures 
  • Ask questions about the text and seek answers 
  • Monitor and adjust reading speed for meaning 
  • Monitor and clarify parts of text that hinder comprehension 
  • Summarize to check understanding of material read 
  • Recognize first‐, second‐, and third‐person points of view 
  • Identify and properly sequence main events 
  • Distinguish between cause and effect 
  • Explain fact and opinion differences in all reading genres 
  • Understand details to develop a main idea 
  • Compare and contrast between books
  • Understand implied ideas or inferences 
  • Identify and explain literal and figurative meanings of words and phrases 
  • Begin to identify and explain idioms
  • The student will demonstrate comprehension of information from a variety of print resources 
  • Develop notes that include important concepts, summaries, and identification of information sources 
  • Organize information on charts, maps, and graphs


Writing

The student will write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly

  • Introduce a topic clearly 
  • Organize related information in paragraphs and sections 
  • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic
  • Apply subject specific vocabulary to explain topic 
  • Use linking phrases as transitions between sentences and topics 
  • Create a conclusion that is related to the information presented in the writing piece 
  • The student will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences 
  • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters;  organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally 
  • Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations 
  • Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events 
  • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely 
  • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events 
  • The student will identify and use correctly in written and spoken language the parts of speech 
  • Identify nouns, including common and proper, and write them correctly in sentences, observe spelling rules for more advanced singular, plural, and possessive nouns 
  • Hone the skill of using exact nouns and appositives in written work 
  • Master the identification and spelling of action, main, and helping verbs (and verb phrases), along with their correct tenses 
  • Write the past tense of more advanced irregular verbs, ensure agreement with forms of the verb be and have, and form contractions with not
  • Define adjectives, proper adjectives, and locate the nouns they describe 
  • Master the use of the articles a, an, and the, forms of the words good and bad 
  • Use the correct form of the adjective when comparing two or more persons, places, or things 
  • Demonstrate elaborating on details in writing by using adjectives 
  • Master the use of subject, object, and possessive pronouns, as well as I and me, pronoun contractions, and pronoun homophones 
  • Define adverbs and the verbs they describe 
  • Use the correct form of the adverb when comparing actions 
  • Demonstrate elaborating on details in writing by using adverbs that modify adjectives and adverbs, in addition to verbs 
  • Master identification of prepositions, prepositional phrases, and objects of prepositions in sentences 
  • Use interjections in writing 
  • The student will understand and correctly use the mechanics of capitalization and punctuation 
  • Master rules of capitalization to proper nouns, applicable abbreviations (including two‐letter state abbreviations), titles, addresses, months, and days 
  • Use commas to combine sentences with phrases 
  • Write with properly punctuated quotations 
  • Proofread and attempt to edit sentences, paragraphs, and peers’ writing 


The student will understand parts of a sentence

  • Distinguish among complete sentences, fragments, and run‐ons 
  • Recognize, write, and properly punctuate statements, questions, commands and exclamatory sentences 
  • Use conjunctions to master the construction of simple and compound sentences. 
  • Begin to construct complex sentences 
  • Rely less on teacher prompting for varied sentence structure in writing


Math
Place Value and Number Sense

  • Read and write numbers within 100,000 
  • Interpret 5‐digit numbers in terms of place value 
  • Compare and order numbers within 100,000 
  • Round off numbers to the nearest 10 or 100 
  • Use estimation in addition and subtraction 
  • Find factors of a whole number up to 100 
  • Find multiples of a 1‐digit number 
  • Find common factors and multiples


Addition and Subtraction

● Understand the terms sum and difference

● Solve 1‐step and 2‐step word problems involving addition and subtraction

● Use the part‐whole and comparison models to represent word problems

● Add and subtract numbers up to 10,000 using the formal algorithm 

● Review strategies for adding and subtracting 2‐digit numbers mentally

● Learn strategies for mentally adding a 2‐digit number close to a 10 or 100 

● Review mental math strategies for making 100 and making 1000

Multiplication and Division

● Multiply a 4‐digit number by a 1‐digit and 2‐digit number

● Divide a 4‐digit number by a 1‐digit number, and by 10

● Use estimation in multiplication and division

● Solve word problems of up to 3 steps

Decimals

● Read and write decimal numbers of up to 3 places

● Locate decimals on a number line

● Compare and order decimals and simple fractions

● Relate money in dollars and cents to decimals

● Convert a decimal number to a fraction

● Convert a fraction with a denominator that is a factor of 100 to a decimal 

● Add and subtract tenths and hundredths 

● Round the decimal numbers to the nearest whole number or tenth 

● Multiply or divide 1‐place and 2‐place decimals by a 1‐digit whole number 

● Estimate the sum, difference, product or quotient in problems involving decimals 

● Round the quotient to one decimal place 

● Solve word problems involving the four operations on decimals

Fractions

● Add or subtract like and related fractions 

● Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions 

● Convert between mixed numbers and improper fractions 

● Add and subtract fractions involving mixed numbers and improper fractions 

● Find fractions of a set 

● Multiply fractions by a whole number 

● Determine the whole from the value of a fractional part of the whole 

● Solve two‐step word problems involving fractions of a set

Measurement

● Review conversions of measurements 

● Review expressing measurements in compound units 

● Review addition and subtraction of compound units 

● Multiply and divide compound units by 1‐digit whole numbers 

● Solve word problems involving measurement

Area and Perimeter

● Find one dimension of a rectangle when given its perimeter and the other dimension 

● Find one dimension of a rectangle when given its area and the other dimension

● Find the perimeter and the area of composite figures made of rectangles and/or squares

Geometry

● Estimate and measure angles 

● Recognize angles of 90, 180, 270 and 360 degrees 

● Construct angles 

● Find unknown complementary or supplementary angles  

● Identify and construct perpendicular and parallel lines

Science
Scientific Investigation, Reasoning, and Logic

● Students will use the scientific method to conduct experiments. In doing so, they will make 

observations, develop questions, formulate hypotheses, plan and perform tests, record and 

analyze their data, and finally draw conclusions based on the data

Living Systems/Life Processes

● Students will investigate and understand the Theory of Evolution

Interrelationships in Earth/Space Systems

● Students will investigate the greenhouse effect and climate change

Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change

● Students will investigate and understand how the Earth’s surface is constantly changing due to 

wind, water, and ice

● Students will investigate the properties and uses of various natural resources, including soil, 

rocks, minerals, and fossil fuels

● Students will investigate the rock cycle including identification of rock types

● Students will investigate Earth’s history and fossil evidence

● Students will identify the basic structure of the Earth’s interior 

Matter

● Students will use the metric system to find length, mass, and volume of matter, and they’ll 

describe matter by other properties as well

● Students will investigate and understand that all matter is made up of atoms

● Students will understand that atoms are made up of electrons, protons, and neutrons

● Students will investigate how elements are represented by chemical symbols, and how 

compounds are represented by chemical formulas

● Students will investigate physical changes and how matter can change state when heat energy is 

gained or lost

● Students will understand that two or more atoms may be chemically combined, atoms in 

compounds can separate from each other, and, as a result, these chemical changes lead to new 

types of matter being formed

Force, Motion, and Energy

● Students will investigate magnetism (attract/repel, poles, magnetic fields), the atomic structure 

of ferromagnetic and non‐ferromagnetic materials, and how the Earth is a magnet

● Student will investigate and understand the characteristics of electricity including static 

electricity, conductors and insulators, and circuits (series & parallel); how mechanical and 

chemical energy can be transformed into electrical energy; electromagnetism; and electrical 

safety

Environmental Awareness

● Students will investigate and understand management of renewable and nonrenewable 

resources

Social Studies
History

● Describe the history and development of Native Americans in Virginia and explain the influence 

of archeology on current records and as a means of learning about the past

● Explain how the Virginia Colony was settled and give reasons for its failures and successes

● Identify Revolutionary leaders and list events that led Virginia to participate in the American 

Revolution

● Understand the issues of states’ rights and slavery in the years before, during, and after the Civil 

War

● Trace the history of Virginia in the 20th century

● Research individuals who made outstanding contributions to Virginia’s history

Geography

● Identify Virginia’s physical geographical features and explain how it influences people’s lives 

past and present

● Apply their map and globe skills to understand and solve potential problems

Economics

● Identify the imports and exports of early Virginia that contributed to the growth of its economy

● Explain how advances in transportation, communication, and technology have contributed to 

Virginia’s role in the global economy

Civics

● Describe the process by which a government was established in 17th century Virginia.

● Understand how Virginia’s colonial government influenced the structure of the national 

government

● Explain how Virginians influenced the creation of the U.S. Constitution

Spanish
The student will continue to develop previously learned vocabulary such as numbers, colors, greetings, family members, animals, parts of the body, feelings, weather, days of the week, months of the year, seasons, clothes, school and classes, Spanish alphabet, house, table setting, 
adjectives and physical descriptions, commonly used verbs, sports and activities, expressions of courtesy, numbers to 100, telling time, animals, food and drink, and geography of Hispanic countries.

  • The student will learn vocabulary for giving directions, writing the date, telling time to the minute, numbers to 1000, saying what you like, pastimes, and places around town. 
  • The student will recognize and follow classroom commands in Spanish.
  • The student will communicate with correct pronunciation. 
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink. 
  • The student will use correct noun and adjective agreement. 
  • The student will be able to ask and answer questions in Spanish about each vocabulary topic. 
  • The student will be able to write a paragraph using acquired vocabulary and correct sentence structure. 
  • The student will read a chapter book in Spanish and answer comprehension questions about what was read. 
  • The student will conjugate –ar, ­er, and ­ir verbs in the present tense. 
  • The student will be able to conjugate some irregular verbs. 
  • The student will be able to use the verbs ser and estar correctly. 
  • The student will write pen pal letters using acquired vocabulary and correct sentence structure. 
  • The student will recognize basic cultural traditions such as holidays, songs, games, sports, food and other activities from the Hispanic world. 
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the year.


Art
Creating: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • The student will generate ideas for works of art through discussion.  
  • The student will use sketches and take notes to document thought processes with creating works of art.  
  • The student will create a work of art that uses themes, ideas, imagery, and art forms from the past.  
  • The student will identify and use the characteristics of color, including hue, tint, and shade.  
  • The student will identify and use variety, repetition, and unity in a work of art.  
  • The student will identify and use a variety of lines in a work of art: (Vertical, horizontal, diagonal, curved, straight, angular, interrupted, thick thin parallel, zigzag, bent, spiral, crosshatched, and contour line)
  • The student will describe and use clay hand‐building techniques, including coiling. 
  • The student will identify positive and negative space in works of art. 
  • The students will use contour drawing and spatial awareness to create a still life. 
  • The student will use gesture drawings to create human figures. 
  • The student will carve a printing block and create a series of block prints. 
  • The student will use a ruler as a straight edge and measuring tool. 
  • The student will solve design problems using color relationships selected from the color wheel.

Presenting: Select, Analyze, and interpret art for presentation.

  • Analyze how past, present, and emerging technologies have impacted the presentation of artwork. 
  • Develop a collection of artwork and design how it could be displayed.

Responding: Perceive and analyse artistic work

  • The student will categorize works of art by subject matter, including portrait, landscape, still life. 
  • The student will discuss how personal beliefs and experience influence responses to works of art. 
  • The student will formulate questions about work of art from past or present cultures 
  • The student will select a preferred work of art from among others and defend choice using appropriate art vocabulary. 
  • The student will support the selection of a work of art using appropriate art vocabulary. 
  • The student will categorize works of art by subject matter, including portrait, landscape, still life.

Connecting: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art. 

  • The student will create a work of art that uses themes, ideas, imagery, and art forms from the past. 
  • The student will discuss how personal beliefs and experience influence responses to works of art. 
  • The student will formulate questions about work of art from past or present cultures: 
  1. Where did it originate? 
  2. Why was it made? 
  3. Who made it? 
  4. What is its function?


Music
The objectives in 4th Grade Music class are for students to:

  • Listen responsively
  • Show enjoyment 
  • Move/dance musically 
  • Sing freely 
  • Show appropriate sense of musical “time” 
  • Participate fully in performance activities 
  • Listen to other musicians in the ensemble and play responsively 
  • Use singing voice in a healthy and appropriate manner 
  • Maintain steady beat while singing, moving, playing instruments 
  • Reproduce simple melodies, including proper pitches and rhythmic patterns, by ear 
  • Perform melodies, basslines, color parts and rhythm parts as a part of the ensemble 
  • Learn more notes in the Treble Clef (extended from the staff)

Physical Education

  • Personal responsibility and feedback 
  • Rules and safety 
  • Movement concepts
  1. Space, Pathways, Shapes and Levels with Sports Skills 
  2. Speed, Directions, and Force 
  3. Chase, flee, and move away from others in a constantly changing environment. 
  4. Overhand throw and catch an object with a partner while both partners are moving. 
  5. Catch a fly ball above the head, below the waist, and away from the body. 
  6. Kick a ball to a moving partner, using the inside of the foot. 
  7. Punt 
  8. Strike, with a paddle or racket, a lightweight object that has been tossed by a partner. 
  9. Strike a gently tossed ball with a bat, using a side orientation. 
  10. Keep a foot-dribbled ball away from a defensive partner. 
  11. Manipulate an object by using a long-handled implement. 
  12. Volley
  • Muscular Strength/Endurance  
  1. Flexibility 
  2. Muscular Strength/Endurance 
  3. Manipulative skills 
  4. Basic Gymnastics Skills 
  5. Catching and Throwing in Game Situation 
  6. Striking 
  7. Using Both Side of Body for Sports Skills(kicking, throwing, catching) 
  8. Prerequisite Sports Skills for Group and Individual Sports
  • Fitness knowledge 
  • Self-Responsibility
  1. Set a personal goal to improve an area of health-related physical fitness and work toward that goal in non-school time. 
  2. Accept responsibility for one’s own performance without blaming others. 
  3. Respond to winning and losing with dignity and respect.
  • Social Interaction 
  1. Include others in physical activities and respect individual differences in skill and motivation.
  • Group Dynamics Group Dynamics 
  1. Accept an opponent’s outstanding skill, use of strategies, or ability to work effectively with teammates as a challenge in physical activities.
Grade 5

Language Arts
Oral Language

  • The student will make planned oral presentations

                - Speak to suit purpose and audience
                - Give a book-talk on a novel read independently each trimester

  • The student will listen critically and express opinions in class discussions

                - Distinguish between fact and fiction
                - Present a convincing argument
                - Provide details to support statements
                - Paraphrase and summarize what is heard as a listener
Reading

  • The student uses reading strategies and can cite specific textual evidence to support conclusions

                - Establish own purpose for reading
                - Choose appropriate independent reading book
                - Identify main problem in a book 
                - Make connections (relates to other text, self, world) 
                - Recognize and explain characteristics of different genres
                - Recognize and chart elements of literature (plot, character, setting)
                - Use strategies to grow ideas about characters
                - Monitor comprehension
                - Develop notes that identify important concepts and generate summaries 
                - Make predictions 
                - Clarify an understanding of texts by creating logical notes
                - Read aloud text fluently and accurately, with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression
                - Draw from background/prior knowledge
                - Identify and use context clues
                - Make logical inferences
                - Recognize and interpret figurative language
                - Read closely to determine text’s meaning
                - Identify types of conflicts in a book 
                - Identify point of view (1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person)
                - Reference a specific event in the text using direct or indirect quotation
Writing 

  • The student develops and strengthens writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach

                - Choose a topic
                - Brainstorm to extend idea (Write Off the Page W-O-P)
                - Use end-punctuation correctly 
                - Apply rules of capitalization 
                - Use commas and apostrophes correctly
                - Use correct dialogue grammar
                - Use descriptive verbs rather than linking or identified “weak” verbs
                - Replace general nouns with specific, sharper nouns
                - Spell accurately and capitalize proper nouns
                - Write in complete sentences (simple, compound, complex) 
                - Use consistent verb tense 
                - Use consistent point of view 
                - Choose meaningful title
                - Self-assess by adding, deleting, or rearrange information
                - Use a line or paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along 

  • The student communicates creatively using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear sequences

                - Write about a specific observable person, object, place, or experience (Pebble)
                - Create voice through first person observations (Power of I)
                - Identify piece's meaning, message, or purpose (So what?)
                - Develop a meaningful title where first, last, and important words capitalized
                - Select strong verbs and nouns 
                - Use two or more examples of figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification)
                - Analyze impact of line breaks and stanzas
                - Directly address the subject (you) as a first person (I)
                - Exaggerate appropriately 
                - Write concisely and make every word matter (Cut to the bone) 
                - Use three or more examples of figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification,)
                - Select line breaks and stanzas thoughtfully
                - Begin and end piece in strong and purposeful way 
                - Reveal thoughts and feelings and convey emotion
                - Prewrite to explore topic and organize information
                - Choose effective introductory technique 
                - Describe setting
                - Develop character 
                - Include internal and external conflict
                - Use details to encourage inference
                - Develop a resolution
                - End piece in strong and purposeful way
                - Create a believable and logical plot line
                - Use dialogue and narration together

  • The student communicates ideas and information in an organized way

                - Write expository composition that follows an appropriate organizational pattern.
                - Introduce and conclude topic strongly
                - Include details to support each subtopic
                - Develop thesis statement that introduces argument  
                - Use a paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along
                - Write in one point of view
                - Develop strong conclusion that revisits thesis
                - Use a variety of complete sentences (simple, compound, complex)
                - Give a complete answer to comprehension questions
                - Repeat key words from the question
                - Include specific evidence clearly stated
Vocabulary

  • The student determines the meaning of vocabulary specific to literature and cumulative word sets

                - Use context clues to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words
                - Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and other word-reference materials
                - Identify synonyms, antonyms and related words within a word set
                - Use the words in context in original creative writing
                - Identify analogies
Grammar

  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing

                - Use end-punctuation correctly
                - Apply rules of capitalization 
                - Use strong, descriptive verbs rather than linking or identified “weak” verbs
                - Use consistent verb tense
                - Replace general nouns with specific, sharper nouns
                - Use descriptive adjectives
                - Identify and apply rules of comma usage
                - Use apostrophes accurately
                - Use correct dialogue grammar
                - Identify elements of simple, compound, and complex sentences
                - Write in complete sentences (simple, compound, complex) 
                - Use a paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along 
                - Spell accurately 

Mathematics
The student will:

  • Explore whole number, including       

              -  determining place values
              -  approximating, estimating
              -  multiplying and dividing by base ten numbers
              -  following order of operations

  • Practice multiplying and dividing whole numbers
  • Explore fractions, including                                     

               -  practicing adding and subtracting involving fractions, mixed numbers, whole numbers, like and unlike denominators
                - practicing multiplying and dividing involving fractions, whole numbers

  • Recall and apply strategies for finding perimeter of rectangle, squares, and composite figures
  • Explore the connection between the rectangle and triangle

                - finding the relationship between the area of a rectangle and triangle
                - discovering the formula for area of triangle

  • Explore the concept of ratio as a relationship between two quantities; involving

                - finding ratio
                - equivalent ratios
                - comparing up to three quantities

  • Explore properties of angles, including

                 - measuring angles
                 - finding unknown angles, including
                          1) angles around a point and angles on a straight line
                          2) right angles
                          3) opposite and equal angles

  • Explore the concept of decimals, including

                   - approximate and estimate decimals
                   - multiply and divide by base ten numbers
                   - multiply decimals and whole numbers
                   - converting various measurements

  • Explore percentage, including

                   - the concept of a percent as a ratio out of 100
                   - manipulating fractions, decimals and percents
                   - finding a percent of a quantity

  • Explore the concept of average
  • Explore the concept of rate

                   -find the rate of two linked quantities

  • Explore graphs as a visual representation of data

                   -read and interpret line graphs

  • Explore the various characteristics and properties of a triangle

                   - identify right, isosceles and equilateral triangle
                   - apply the properties of a triangle, including
                            1) sum of the angles of a triangle is 180 degrees
                            2) exterior angle of a triangle is equal to the sum of the opposite interior angles
                   - apply the properties of a right triangle, including
                            1) sum of the angles opposite the right angle of a right triangle is 90 degrees
                   - explore the specific characteristics of isosceles and equilateral triangles
                   - apply the properties of isosceles and equilateral triangles, including
                            1) base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal
                            2) angles of equilateral triangle are 60 degrees

  • Explore four-sided figures

                   - identify parallelograms, rhombuses, and trapezoids
                   - recognize that rhombuses, rectangles and squares fit into the broader category of parallelograms
                   - explore properties of parallelograms and trapezoids

Science

  • The student will evaluate systems and standards of measurement and will be able to:

                   - Understand types of quantities that are measured (length, mass, volume, temperature, time)
                   - Comprehend the metric system and discover why SI units are critical for communication worldwide
                   - Convert from one metric unit to another
                   - Select and use appropriate tools for measuring objects in the environment

  • The student will plan and conduct investigations in which they:

                   - Identify a problem/question and propose a testable hypothesis based on direct observations
                   - Design an experiment with identifiable dependent and independent variables, constants and control
                   - Choose appropriate laboratory instruments to accurately measure quantitative data using metric units (triple beam and electronic                                    balances, thermometers, metric rulers, graduated cylinders)
                   - Collect, record, analyze and report data using appropriate technologies, graphical representation, and written expression
                   - Construct models and simulations to illustrate and explain phenomena
                   - Use current applications to reinforce scientific concepts

  • The student will become skilled at microscopic observation. Key concepts include:

                   - History and types of microscopes
                   - Parts of the microscope and their function
                   - Determination of magnification
                   - Observation of variety of specimens using compound microscope

  • The student will investigate and understand that all living things are composed of cells. Key concepts include 

                   - Development of cell theory
                   - Cell structure and function of key organelles
                   - Similarities and differences between plant and animal cell

  • The student will investigate and understand that organisms are made up of one or more cells and have distinguishing characteristics. Key                       concepts include:

                   - Characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
                   - Classification of organisms using physical characteristics, body structures, and behavior of organism
                   - Traits of organisms that allow them to survive in their environment
                   - Interaction between organisms in an ecosystem – producer, consumer, predator/prey, and parasite/host relationship

  • The student will be introduced to the concept of dissection. Key concepts include:

                   - Use of appropriate tools necessary for dissection
                   - Skillful incision and extraction of organs with respect for the organism

  • The student will investigate and understand the characteristics of sound waves. Key concepts include:

                   - Wavelength, frequency, speed, amplitude, rarefaction, and compression
                   - Resonance
                   - Ability of different media (solids, liquids, and gases) to transmit sound
                   - Technological applications of sound

  • The student will investigate and understand the scientific principles of force,  motion, and work. Key concepts include:

                   - Identify types of forces - gravitational, frictional, magnetic
                   - Distinguish between balanced and unbalanced force
                   - Explore the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration
                   - Identify the six simple machines and analyze their role in performing work
                   - Technological applications of work, force, and motion

  •  The student will investigate and understand the characteristics of the ocean environment. Key concepts include:

                   - Geological characteristics – ocean topography
                   - Physical characteristics – depth, salinity, temperature
                   - Ecological characteristics – marine food chain & food web

Social Studies
Geography of the United States

  • Identify key elements of a world map and key geographic terms
  • Use latitude and longitude to determine absolute locations on Earth
  • Label major physical features of the United States
  • Draw and label a map
  • Examine quotations from a primary source
  • Write a journal entry

American Indians and Their Land

  • Trace the migration routes of American Indians into North America
  • Summarize key features of four environments
  • Identify ways in which the Inuits adapted to their Arctic environment
  • Examine historical events recorded in Sioux pictographs that show how geography affected the lives of the Sioux
  • Create illustrated vocabulary charts
  • Interpret images through an act-it-out

American Indian Cultural Regions

  • Identify, compare, and contrast seven American Indian cultural regions
  • Analyze artifacts to identify which ones American Indians may have used as they adapted to each region
  • Identify aspects of the ways of life of four young American Indians from different cultural regions
  • Organize information into diagrams to show connections
  • Write captions, questions, and persuasive letters
  • Present and support decisions

Experiential Migration Activity

  • Collaborate and cooperate with classmates to reenact Native American migration
  • Construct shelter and clothing using creativity and incorporate content knowledge of shelter methods
  • Reenact a Native American hunting method using archery

How and Why Europeans Came to the New World

  • Make connections between exploration in the 1400s and 1500s and exploration today
  • Identify and record key information about objects on an explorer’s ship
  • Categorize eight objects of exploration as one of the following: a navigation tool, a motive for exploration, or a newly introduced product from the Americas

Routes and Exploration to the New World

  • Identify, organize, and analyze key facts about eight early European explorers who led expeditions to the New World
  • Trace and label explorers’ routes and identify the motives for the explorations of eight early European explorers
  • Predict the level of impact eight early European explorers had on North American history

Early English Settlements

  • Compare and contrast the three English settlements of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth
  • Locate American Indian and English settlements on a map of colonial southern New England
  • Analyze the causes and effects of events before and during King Philip’s War

Comparing the Colonies

  • Identify key features of six colonies: Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Georgia
  • Design billboards to promote each colony
  • Compare and contrast the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies
  • Draw conclusions from a map

Facing Slavery

  • Analyze three dilemmas faced by West Africans in the European slave trade
  • Consider the available choices for West Africans in slave trade dilemmas and identify what actions they took
  • Identify aspects of the lives of enslaved Africans and consider the ways in which plantation owners viewed these activities

Life in Colonial Williamsburg

  • Identify important sites in colonial Williamsburg
  • Describe six aspects of life in colonial Williamsburg: education, trades, social life, government, slavery, and religion
  • Compare and contrast life in colonial Williamsburg with life in the students’ community
  • Compare and contrast colonial religious services before and after the Great Awakening using a Venn diagram
  • Role-play aspects of colonists’ daily lives 
  • Write a letter describing life in colonial Williamsburg and comparing it to life in your community

The American Revolution

  • Make connections between a tug-of-war game and the events of the American Revolution
  • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the American and British forces in the American Revolution
  • Identify some of the roles of women in the American Revolution
  • Depict ways in which the American Revolution affected slaves and American Indians
  • Take part in an orchestrated tug-of-war. (speaking and listening)
  • Illustrate and explain experiences of slaves or American Indians 

The Constitution

  • Identify the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation and the work of the delegates to the Constitutional
  • Describe the convention that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution
  • Examine and list the key powers of the three branches of government created by the Constitution
  • Identify which branch(es) of the government can act in certain situations
  • Identify three issues that the delegates to the Constitution Convention agreed on and three that they debated
  • Play a game to demonstrate how the federal government works in a variety of situations. (speaking and listening)
  • Write a summary of a newspaper article


French
Listening

  • The student will understand and repeat the French alphabet and numbers
  • The student will respond to formulaic yes/no and informational questions
  • The student will understand and follow directions in French
  • The student will distinguish between similar sounds and will understand intonation patterns
  • The student will comprehend native speakers using grammatical structures and everyday vocabulary normally encountered in France or francophone countries at natural conversational speed
  • The student will distinguish between a statement, command, and question

Speaking

  • The student will carry out conversations about a variety of topics such as telling time, ordering food, inviting someone over, accepting/declining and invitation, describing people's appearance, etc
  • The student will communicate with students from Guadeloupe via Skype to practice their speaking skills
  • The student will order from a menu; be able to discuss food allergies and preferences in French
  • The student will be able to create a story with newly acquired vocabulary and structure
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink
  • The student will be able to ask and answer more complex questions in French about newly acquired vocabulary
  • The student will write and perform skits about greeting others, telling the time, talking about the weather, ordering in a restaurant, talking about what you like to do, talking about your schedule, family, pets, etc

Reading

  • The student will be able to read the songs that are learned in class, the stories that are written, and their individual descriptions of the world around them
  • The student will read and understand the cultural and dialogue sections provided in the textbook
  • The student will read the play that he/she writes
  • The student will be able to answer comprehension questions on the reading
  • The student will read aloud with correct pronunciation, intonation, emphasis, and expression
  • The student will read a chapter book and answer questions about the story orally and in writing

Writing

  • The student will write pen pal letters using newly acquired vocabulary and structures


Spanish
Listening

  • The student will understand and repeat the Spanish alphabet and numbers
  • The student will respond to formulaic yes/no and informational questions
  • The student will understand and follow directions in Spanish
  • The student will distinguish between similar sounds and will understand intonation patterns
  • The student will comprehend native speakers using grammatical structures and everyday vocabulary normally encountered in Spanish speaking countries at natural conversational speed
  • The student will distinguish between a statement, command, and question


Speaking

  • The student will carry out conversations about a variety of topics such as telling time, ordering food, inviting someone over, accepting/declining and invitation, describing people's appearance, etc
  • The student will order from a menu; be able to discuss food allergies and preferences in Spanish
  • The student will be able to create a story with newly acquired vocabulary and structure
  • The student will be able to ask permission to go to the bathroom or get a drink
  • The student will be able to ask and answer more complex questions in Spanish about newly acquired vocabulary
  • The student will write and perform skits about greeting others, telling the time, talking about the weather, ordering in a restaurant, talking about what you like to do, talking about your schedule, family, pets, etc

Reading

  • The student will be able to read the songs that are learned in class, the stories that are written, and their individual descriptions of the world around them
  • The student will read and understand the cultural and dialogue sections provided in the textbook
  • The student will read the play that he/she writes
  • The student will be able to answer comprehension questions on the reading
  • The student will read aloud with correct pronunciation, intonation, emphasis, and expression
  • The student will read a chapter book and answer questions about the story orally and in writing

Writing

  • The student will write pen pal letters using newly acquired vocabulary and structures


Art

  • Develop an introductory understanding of the vast multiple mediums and concepts within art.
  • Formulate a non-hierarchical view of media.   
  • Develop an understanding of the arts as a global conversation.
  • Develop an introductory understanding of how time and narration is incorporated into technology integrated arts and artist books.  
  • Synthesize information given in a multiple ways to produce works of art.
  • Use the elements of art; line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space to express ideas, images, and emotions.
  • Develop ideas for works of art by conducting research and making preliminary sketches.
  • Demonstrate a proficiency for researching an artist or time period and producing a work of art conceptually and aesthetically similar.  
  • Demonstrate an understanding of symbolic meanings by incorporating symbols in a work of art.
  • Express ideas through artistic choices of media, techniques, and subject matter.
  • Use new technology to produce works of art and conduct research.
  • Use three-dimensional art media to create a sculpture that is kinetic and conceptual-based.
  • Develop a unique artistic voice through independent critical thinking and varying processes.  


Music

In Grade 5 Music class, students will:

  • Listen to other musicians in the ensemble and plays responsively 
  • Use singing voice in a healthy and appropriate manner 
  • Maintain steady beat while singing, moving, playing instruments 
  • Reproduce simple melodies, including proper pitches and rhythmic patterns, by ear 
  • Perform melodies, basslines, color parts and rhythm parts as a part of the ensemble 
  • Compose simple, original melodies on Orff instruments 
  • Learn about specific composers from the Western Canon 
  • Learn both fixed and moveable “DO” solfege 
  • Attend a performance of  the Washington Bach Consort

Physical Education
In 5th Grade PE class, students work on developing the following skills:

  • Application of movement concepts to improve loco-motor, non-loco-motor and manipulative skills.
  • How to identify physical activities that promote good health.
  • How to exhibit cooperative, respectful, safe behaviors in physical activity settings.
  • Activities include: hockey, soccer, cooperative games, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, tennis, swimming, basketball, tumbling, badminton, lacrosse, and fitness tests.


Speech & Drama
Speech Objectives
Listening

  • The student will develop active listening strategies

Verbal Communication

  • The student will the student will Read aloud with fluency
  • The student will use clear, precise, organized language that reflects the conventions of spoken English
  • The student will select and use suitable vocabulary for intended audience

Non-Verbal Communication

  • The student will use effective non-verbal communication skills to maintain audience interest while speaking

Discussion/Debate

  • The student will participate in class discussions appropriately
  • The student will use details, examples, and reasons to support central ideas or clarify a point of view

Oral Presentations

  • The student will develop and deliver a formal presentation based on a central theme, including logical sequence
  • The student will speak in a variety of situations to inform and/or relate experiences
  • The student will prepare, rehearse and deliver a formal presentation to an audience of classmates and/or peers

Broadcast Journalism

  • The student will develop effective skills for communicating through various forms of audio media including voice recording and public address systems
  • The student will develop effective skills in reading from a prompter and speaking to the camera
  • The student will deliver a video news report from script provided by the teacher

Analysis/Critical Response

  • The student will determine a speaker’s purpose, attitude, and perspective
  • The student will understand and use criteria from a rubric to evaluate and improve oral presentations
  • The student will provide constructive feedback to speakers concerning their delivery

Drama Objectives
Performance

  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by presenting a short improvised scene
  • The student will recognize that the whole body is used in acting
  • The student will explore the use of the voice in acting
  •  The student will demonstrate acting skills by portraying him/herself in a variety of improvised scenarios
  • The student will build trust, cooperation, confidence, and develop listening skills through participation in theatre games and team building activities
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the areas of the stage

Technical Theatre

  • The student will identify and explain introductory technical theatre vocabulary
  • The student will recognize different types of stages

Analysis/Criticism

  • The student will recognize various types of theatrical productions
  • The student will compare and contrast theatre to other performance media
  • The student will understand that a scene has a beginning, middle, and end
  • The student will recognize that theatre is a representation of life
  • The student will express personal reactions to live theatre or related media
  • The student will give oral criticism of performances using appropriate theatre vocabulary
  • The student will demonstrate appropriate performance behavior as a participant and/or audience member
Grade 6

Language Arts
Oral Language

  • The student will make planned oral presentations
    • Speak to suit purpose and audience
    • Give a book-talk on a novel read independently each trimester

  • The student will listen critically and express opinions in class discussions
    • Distinguish between fact and fiction
    • Compare and contrast viewpoints
    • Present a convincing argument
    • Provide details to support statements
    • Paraphrase and summarize what is heard as a listener
    • Ask probing questions to seek elaboration and clarification of ideas

Reading

  • The student uses reading strategies and can cite specific textual evidence to support conclusions
    • Establish own purpose for reading
    • Choose appropriate independent reading book
    • Identify main problem in a book
    • Make connections (relates to other text, self, world)
    • Recognize and explain characteristics of different genres
  • Recognize and chart elements of literature (plot, character, setting) 
  • Understand how setting, character, conflict, theme, and plot development are used in conjunction to support a central storyline
  • Use strategies to grow ideas about characters
  • Monitor comprehension
  • Develop notes that identify important concepts and generate summaries
  • Clarify an understanding of texts by creating logical notes
  • Read aloud text fluently and accurately, with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression
  • Paraphrase and summarize main points in a text
  • Identify and use context clues
  • Draw from background/prior knowledge
  • Make inferences, draw conclusions, and compare and contrast different readings
  • Recognize and interpret figurative language
  • Read closely to determine text’s meaning
  • Identify types of conflicts in a book 
  • Identify point of view (1st person, 2nd person, 3rd person) 
  • Reference a specific event in the text using direct or indirect quotation
  • Locate information to support opinions, predictions, and conclusions
  • Identify cause-and-effect relationships
  • Analyze poetry for style and meaning

Writing

  • The student develops and strengthens writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach 
    • Choose a topic
    • Brainstorm to extend idea (Write Off the Page W-O-P)
    • Apply rules of capitalization
  • Use pronoun-antecedent consistency
  • Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses
  • Use rules governing the use of commas, apostrophes, semicolons and colons
    • Choose adverbs to describe verb, adjectives, and other adverbs
    • Use correct dialogue grammar
    • Use descriptive verbs rather than linking or identified “weak” verbs
    • Replace general nouns with specific, sharper nouns

  • Spell accurately (including homophones) and capitalize proper nouns 
  • Write in complete sentences (simple, compound, complex)
  • Edit for clausal fragments and run-on sentences
  • Use consistent verb tense
  • Use consistent point of view
  • Choose meaningful title
    • Self-assess by adding, deleting, or rearrange information
    • Offer constructive peer feedback
  • Use a line or paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along
  • The student communicates creatively using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear sequences
  • Prewrite to explore topic and organize information
  • Generate poetry and prose in a variety of styles
  • Write about a specific observable person, object, place, or experience (Pebble)
  • Create voice through first person observations (Power of I)
  • Identify piece's meaning, message, or purpose (So what?)
  • Develop a meaningful title where first, last, and important words capitalized
  • Select strong verbs and nouns
  • Use vivid details such as sensory descriptions, similes, metaphors, and personifications
  • Analyze impact of line breaks and stanzas
    • Write concisely and make every word matter (Cut to the bone)
    • Select line breaks and stanzas thoughtfully
    • Begin and end piece in strong and purposeful way
    • Reveal thoughts and feelings and convey emotion
  • Create a believable and logical plot line
  • Choose effective introductory technique (dialogue, action, setting, character, etc.)
  • Create and develop a unique setting that plays mind movies in the reader’s head
  • Develop character to include internal and external conflict
  • Use details to encourage inference
  • Develop a resolution (no loose ends)
  • End piece in strong and purposeful way
  • Use dialogue and narration together
  • The student communicates ideas and information in an organized way 
    • Use a variety of graphic organizers to plan writing 
    • Write multi-paragraph essays (descriptive, compare/contrast, personal narrative) 
    • Further develop five-paragraph essay writing skills 
    • Write expository composition that follows an appropriate organizational pattern 
    • Introduce and conclude topic strongly 
    • Include details to support each subtopic 
    • Develop a concise thesis that states the topic and subtopics in a way that presents an argument 
    • Use a paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along 
    • Write in one point of view 
    • Develop strong conclusion that revisits thesis 
    • Use a variety of complete sentences (simple, compound, complex) 
    • Give a complete answer to comprehension questions 
    • Repeat key words from the question 
    • Include specific evidence clearly stated  


Vocabulary

  • The student determines the meaning of vocabulary specific to literature and cumulative word sets 
    • Use context clues to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words 
    • Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and other word-reference materials 
    • Identify synonyms, antonyms and related words within a word set 
    • Use the words in context in original creative writing 
    • Create word maps as visual learning aids 
    • Identify logical categories within a word set 
    • Identify and create analogies

Grammar

  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing 
    • Use end-punctuation correctly 
    • Apply rules of capitalization  
    • Use strong, descriptive verbs rather than linking or identified “weak” verbs 
    • Use consistent verb tense 
    • Replace general nouns with specific, sharper nouns 
    • Use descriptive adjectives 
    • Identify and apply rules of comma usage 
    • Use apostrophes accurately 
    • Use pronoun-antecedent consistency  
    • Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses 
    • Use correct dialogue grammar 
    • Identify elements of simple, compound, and complex sentences 
    • Use and punctuate correctly varied sentence structures to include conjunctions and transition words 
    • Edit for clausal fragments and run-on sentences 
    • Edit for verb tense consistency 
    • Write in complete sentences (simple, compound, complex)  
    • Use a paragraph structure of natural breaks and transitions to move the reader along  
    • Spell accurately (including homophones)

Math
Students will:

  • Explore the concept of algebraic expressions

               - Use letters to represent unknown numbers
               - Write simple algebraic expressions
               - Evaluate expressions by substitution

  • Explore solid figures

               - Associate two-dimensional drawings with three-dimensional shapes
               - Visualize pyramids, prisms, and cylinders from two-dimensional drawings
               - Identify nets of cubes, cuboids, prisms, and pyramids
                -Identify the solid represented by a net
               - Determine whether a figure can be the net of a given solid
               - Determine whether a solid can be formed from a given net

  • Recall and apply previous knowledge of ratios to the following aspects

               - Compare quantities using ratios
               - Express a ratio in its simplest form
               - Relate ratios to units
               - Relate ratios to a fraction of a quantity
               - Relate proportion to ratios and fractions

  • Recall and apply previous knowledge of percentage to the following aspects

               - Express part of a whole as a fraction or as a percentage
               - Relate percentage to fractions and to decimals
               - Express one quantity as a percentage of another
               - Find the whole or a percentage part when given the value of a percentage part

  • Explore the concept of speed as ratio of distance and time

               - Interpret speed as distance traveled per unit of time
               - Read and write units of speed
               - Find average speed
               - Manipulate the formula for speed to isolate each component

  • Expand understanding of fractions

               - Practice mixed operations which involves all four operations and fractions with and without parenthesis
               - Solve multi-step problems involving fractions

  • Explore the characteristics of a circle, including

               - Identify and measure the radius and diameter of a circle
               - Recognize the relationship between diameter and circumference; find the circumference of a circle
               - Recognize the relationship between radius and area; find the area of a circle
               - Determine the perimeter and area of parts of a circle and composite figures

  • Explore graphs as a visual representation of data

               - Read and interpret circle graphs, using whole numbers, fractions and percents
               - Use given data to create a pie chart

  • Explore the concept of volume, including

               - Find the volume of cubes and cuboids
               - Manipulate the volume formula to isolate each component

  • Expand on the concept of volume, including

               - Find an unknown dimension when given other remaining dimensions
               - Convert the volume of a liquid

  • Expand understanding of triangles and other four sided figures

               - Recall and apply previous knowledge of angles, triangles and quadrilateral
               - Find unknown angles in problems involving triangles and quadrilaterals

  • Solve more challenging word problems involving

                - Whole numbers, decimals, and fractions
                - Ratios and percentages
                - Speed

Science

  • The student will be able to:

                 - Understand types of quantities that are measured (length, mass, volume, temperature, time)
                 - Convert from one metric unit to another
                 - Select and use appropriate tools for measuring objects in the environment
                 - Compare accuracy and precision when analyzing measurement results

  • The student will plan and conduct investigations in which they:

                 - Identify a problem/question and propose a testable hypothesis based on direct observations and research of scientific literature
                 - Design an experiment with identifiable dependent and independent variables, constants, and control
                 - Choose appropriate laboratory instruments to accurately measure quantitative data using metric units
                 - Collect, record, analyze and report data using appropriate technologies, graphical representation, and written expression
                 - Write laboratory reports (hypothesis, procedure, conclusion)
                 - Construct and interpret scales, diagrams, charts, graphs, tables,maps, and imagery
                 - Construct models and simulations to illustrate and explain phenomena
                 - Use current applications to reinforce scientific concepts

  • The student will investigate and understand the characteristics light and how it behaves. Key concepts include: 

                 - Transverse waves
                 - Electromagnetic Spectrum
                 - Images formed by lenses and mirrors
                 - Refraction of light through water and prisms
                 - Technological applications of light

  • The student will investigate and understand the scientific principles of work, force, and motion. Key concepts include:   

                 - Types of forces - gravitational, frictional, magnetic, applied, normal
                 - Predict the effect of these forces on an object and represent them using free body diagrams
                 - Understand that motion of objects is related to the forces acting on the objects
                 - Explore the relationship between force, mass and acceleration
                 - Newton’s laws of motion and their application to understand how forces affect an object’s motion
                 - Technological applications of work, force, and motion

  • The student will investigate and understand sources of energy, transformations, and uses. Key concepts include:

                 - Potential and kinetic energy
                 - Renewable and non-renewable energy sources
                 - Energy transformations

  • The student will investigate and understand that matter is anything that has mass and occupies space. Key concepts include:

                 - Distinguishing properties of each phase of matter
                 - Effect of temperature on the phases of matter
                 - Atoms and elements
                 - Molecules and compounds

  • The student will investigate and understand that all matter is made up of atoms. Key concepts include:

                - Atoms consist of particles including electrons, protons and neutrons
                - Atoms of a particular element are alike but are different from atoms of other elements
                - Elements maybe represented by chemical symbols
                - Two or more atoms of different elements may combine to form a compound
                - Compounds maybe represented by chemical formulas
                - Describe the structure and properties of elements
                - Recognize the importance of elements and compounds in our lives

  • The student will explore and understand the role of the atmosphere and ocean in Earth’s energy management. Key concepts include:

                - Properties of air and the structure and dynamics of the Earth’s atmosphere
                - How the sun’s energy is transferred and balanced as part of Earth's energy budget.
                - Earth’s natural greenhouse effect its significance to life on the planet
                - Explore how the unequal heating of Earth’s surface and Earth’s rotation result in global winds and ocean surface currents
                - Water as a universal solvent
                - Properties of water in all three phases
                - Action of water in physical and chemical weathering
                - Understand the ability of large bodies of water to store thermal energy and moderate climate
                - Understand how the flow of thermal energy is regulated between the atmosphere and oceans
                - Study and interpret basic information from weather maps including fronts, systems, and basic measurements of temperature, pressure,                             humidity, and dew point

  • The student will investigate and understand public policy decisions relating to the environment. Key concepts include:

                 - Controversy surrounding global climate change
                 - Analysis of natural events and human activities
                 - CO2 levels and global temperature rise
                 - Melting of polar ice caps and rising sea levels
                 - Ozone layer depletion
                 - Cost and benefit associated with alternative energy sources

  • The student will investigate and understand the natural process and human interactions that affect watershed systems. Key concepts include:         - Comprehend and understand the basic terminology related to ecology – ecosystem, population, community, habitat, biotic, and abiotic                           factors, food chain, food web

                 - Discuss the interaction between organisms in an ecosystem – producer, consumer, predator/prey and parasite/host relationship
                 - Nutrient cycling with energy flow through the ecosystem  
                 - Understand an estuary in terms of its abiotic and biotic components
                 - Investigate how pollution degrades an ecosystem
                 - Effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems with emphasis on the Chesapeake Bay

  • The student will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system and the interactions among the various bodies that comprise it.    Key concepts include: 

                 - Planet distribution and size
                 - Role of gravity
                 - Earth’s rotation and revolution
                 - Moon as Earth’s satellite
                 - History and technology of space exploration
                 - Challenges to living in space

Social Studies
 The Tools of Geography

  • Understand the difference between absolute and relative location
  • Locate major parallels and meridians
  • Use latitude and longitude to determine absolute location
  • Measure distance using scale
  • Identify continents and oceans for a given hemisphere
  • Understand how Earth-sun relations cause seasons
  • Understand the relative merits of five map projections (Mercator, Eckert IV, Robinson, Goode’s Homolosine, and Lambert Equal-Area)
  • Design a map with basic map components (title, legend, compass rose, grid system, scale)


The Causes of the Civil War

  • Identify key events that led to the Civil War
  • Use an illustrated metaphor to examine events leading to the Civil War
  • Predict the effect of Uncle Tom’s Cabin on the debate about slavery in the 1850s
  • Present or watch an act-it-out
  • Write a newspaper editorial
  • Draw and label a map


The Civil War

  • Create character collages on figures of soldiers by recording notes on five aspects of the Civil War
  • Draw conclusions about whether the lives of African Americans in the South improved after the Civil War by charting positive and negative changes experienced by former slaves
  • Perform an act-it-out of a Union encampment (speaking and listening)
  • Write a eulogy honoring Gettysburg soldiers (writing)
  • Examine Civil War events to analyze how geography played an important role


World Geography

  • Identify continents, countries, oceans, seas, major rivers of the world

A Spatial Way of Thinking

  • Define the terminology specific to six types of thematic maps: physical features, climate zones, vegetation zones, populations density, economic activity, and regions
  • Analyze six thematic maps to gather information about the world


Consumption Patterns in the United States: The Impact of Living Well

  • Demonstrate an ability to read and interpret cartograms
  • Identify current consumption patterns in the United States
  • Compare U.S. consumption patterns with those of other countries around the world
  • Evaluate the effects and predict the future impact of growing levels of consumerism


Migration to the United States: The Impact on People and Places

  • Understand the primary reasons people emigrate from their country of birth and immigrate to the United States
  • Identify key ways in which migration impacts the United States, immigrants, and the countries left behind
  • Learn about other important migration streams around the world
  • Research project: Learn about your family’s push and pull factor migration stories

 
Micro-entrepreneurs: Women’s Role in the Development of Africa

  • Explain challenges faced by women in developing countries in Africa
  • Describe how African women micro-entrepreneurs have changed the human characteristics of the places where they live and work 
  • Identify where microcredit institutions are most active and explain why the majority of their clients are women


The Global Sneaker: From Asia to Everywhere

  • Identify the components and steps of manufacturing a global product
  • Explain the impact of globalization on people and places 
  • Analyze the global efforts needed to design, manufacture, and distribute a particular product


French

Listening

  • The student will understand and follow directions in French, such as classroom procedures or directions for using iPad and other classroom technology
  • The student will respond to yes/no and informational questions
  • The student will distinguish between similar sounds
  • The student will participate in dictations and be able to write down sentences that are said out loud
  • The student will distinguish between true/false, logical/illogical, and similarly structured statements

Speaking

  • The student will speak in complete sentences with correct pronunciation and intonation
  • The student will use basic greetings, farewells, and expressions of good manners
  • The student will express likes and dislikes requests, descriptions, and guidelines
  • The student will ask and answer questions about familiar topics
  • The student will engage in short conversations and debates
  • The student will express opinions, and describe people, pictures, and situations
  • The student will use correct word order and be able to speak in the present, near past, and near future tenses
  • The student will discuss actions that involve other people and oneself applying the mechanics of the French grammar learned throughout the year

Reading

  • The student will identify key words, cognates and some mechanical expressions when reading
  • The student will read and understand the cultural and dialogue sections in the textbook
  • The student will read a specific French book and respond to comprehension questions
  • The student will read online French news to obtain information such as LesPetitsCitoyens.com, L’actu etc.
  • The student will read standardized messages once vocabulary has been learned, such as signs, schedules, newspaper headlines, advertisements, and menus 
  • The student will use guessing strategies and cognates to interpret unfamiliar vocabulary

Writing

  • The student will demonstrate increasing attention to specific word order, punctuation, accents and other accent marks, and spelling
  • The student will write simple sentences on familiar topics in short paragraph  using correct grammar and tenses
  • The student will recognize the different grammatical parts of speech (noun, adjective, verb, etc.) and be able to form agreement between the various parts of speech (singular/plural, subject/verb, noun adjective, masculine/feminine, etc.)

Culture

  • The student will focus on French geography (cities, rivers, mountains, landmarks, and so forth)
  • The student will familiarize themselves with the Francophone countries from all over the world
  • The student will learn about French comic strip characters, such as Astérix et Obélix and Boule et Bill.
  • The student will celebrate French holidays throughout the school year


Spanish
Listening

  • The student will understand and follow directions in Spanish, such as classroom procedures or directions for using iPad and other classroom technology
  • The student will respond to yes/no and informational questions
  • The student will distinguish between similar sounds
  • The student will participate in dictations and be able to write down sentences that are spoken out loud
  • The student will distinguish between true/false, logical/illogical, and similarly structured statements

Speaking

  • The student will speak in complete sentences with correct pronunciation and intonation
  • The student will use basic greetings, farewells, and expressions of good manners
  • The student will express likes and dislikes requests, descriptions, and guidelines
  • The student will ask and answer questions about familiar topics
  • The student will engage in short conversations and debates
  • The student will express opinions, and describe people, pictures, and situations
  • The student will use correct word order and be able to speak in the present, near past, and near future tenses
  • The student will discuss actions that involve other people and oneself applying the mechanics of the Spanish grammar learned throughout the year

Reading

  • The student will identify key words, cognates and some mechanical expressions when reading
  • The student will read and understand the cultural and dialogue sections in the textbook
  • The student will read a specific Spanish novella and respond to comprehension questions
  • The student will read standardized messages once vocabulary has been learned, such as signs, schedules, newspaper headlines, advertisements, and menus
  • The student will use guessing strategies and cognates to interpret unfamiliar vocabulary

Writing

  • The student will demonstrate increasing attention to specific word order, punctuation, accents and other accent marks, and spelling
  • The student will write simple sentences on familiar topics in short paragraph using correct grammar and tenses
  • The student will recognize the different grammatical parts of speech (noun, adjective, verb, etc.) and be able to form agreement between the various parts of speech (singular/plural, subject/verb, noun adjective, masculine/feminine, etc.)

Culture

  • The student will focus on Spanish geography (cities, rivers, mountains, landmarks, and so forth)
  • The student will familiarize themselves with the Spanish-speaking countries from all over the world
  • The student will celebrate Spanish holidays throughout the school year


Music
In Grade 6 Music class students will:

  • Practice whole body, active listening when listening to and learning music 
  • Listen to other musicians in the ensemble while playing and "locks in" accordingly 
  • Use effective practicing techniques, such as "chunking," slower tempo, repetition 
  • Maintain steady beat while singing, moving, playing instruments 
  • Reproduce simple melodies, including proper pitches and rhythmic patterns, by ear 
  • Perform melodies, basslines, color parts and rhythm parts as a part of the ensemble 
  • Perform simple poly-rhythms 
  • Sing more complex solfege songs 
  • Start to learn Musical Historical Context 
  • Attend a performance by the Washington Bach Consort of a Bach Cantata


Art

  • Develop an introductory understanding of the vast multiple mediums and concepts within art.
  • Formulate a non-hierarchical view of media.   
  • Develop an understanding of the arts as a global conversation.
  • Develop an introductory understanding of modern art history and contemporary art aesthetic trends.  
  • Synthesize information given in a multiple ways to produce works of art.
  • Use the elements of art; line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space to express ideas, images, and emotions.
  • Develop ideas for works of art by conducting research and making preliminary sketches.
  • Demonstrate a proficiency for researching an artist or time period and producing a work of art conceptually and aesthetically similar.  
  • Demonstrate an understanding of symbolic meanings by incorporating symbols in a work of art.
  • Express ideas through artistic choices of media, techniques, and subject matter.
  • Use new technology to produce works of art and conduct research.
  • Use three-dimensional art media to create an installation that is site-specific and conceptual.
  • Develop a unique artistic voice through independent critical thinking and artistic choice.

 
Physical Education
In 6th Grade Physical Education class, the students work on developing the following skills:

  • Application of movement principles and concepts to movement skill performance; refine and adapt individual and group activity skills by applying concepts of relationship, effort, spatial awareness, speed and pathways How to identify physical activities that promote good health.
  • How to exhibit cooperative, respectful, safe behaviors in physical activity settings.
  • Activities include: hockey, soccer, cooperative games, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, tennis, swimming, basketball, tumbling, badminton, lacrosse, and fitness tests.

Speech & Drama
Speech
Listening

  • The student will demonstrate active listening strategies in a variety of situations

Verbal Communication

  • The student will demonstrate appropriate vocal delivery strategies
  • The student will use language that stimulates an audience’s interest
  • The student will use varied word choice to clarify, illustrate and elaborate

Non-Verbal Communication

  • The student will use visual aids and/or props effectively while speaking to enhance verbal communication

Discussion/Debate

  • The student will stay focused on a topic and ask relevant questions during class discussions
  • The student will support a position with organized, appropriate details

Oral Presentations

  • The student will develop and deliver a formal presentation using appropriate organizational structure
  • The student will speak in a variety of situations to demonstrate a task or skill

Broadcast Journalism

  • The student will demonstrate ability to work as a team member to effectively deliver information through audio and video media
  • The student will collaborate with classmates to create the script for and deliver a video news report

Analysis/Critical Response

  • The student will analyze the effectiveness of demonstrations
  • The student will understand and use criteria from a rubric to evaluate and improve oral presentations
  • The student will provide constructive feedback to speakers concerning organization and content of their speech

Drama 
Performance

  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by presenting a scripted scene
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by using movement and gestures
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by using vocal projection, inflection and articulation
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by portraying a character other than her/himself
  • The student will continue to build trust, cooperation, confidence, and develop listening skills through participation in group acting exercises and scenes
  • The student will demonstrate basic stage positions, movement and stage business in a presentation
  • Utilize directorial concepts of levels, planes and proximity in acting presentations

Technical Theatre

  • The student will select and use available technical elements in classroom presentations
  •  The student will identify the three major types of stages-proscenium, thrust and arena

Analysis/Criticism

  • The student will identify drama as a form of literature
  • The student will compare and contrast theatre to other literary genres
  • The student will identify various parts of a script
  • The student will recognize that theatre incorporates other art forms
  • The student will understand that theatre is an immediate art form that affects each individual in a personal way
  • The student will give oral criticism of performances and technical elements using appropriate theatre vocabulary
  • The student will demonstrate appropriate performance behavior as a participant and/or audience member
Grade 7

Language Arts
Oral Language

  • The student will engage in speaking and listening to generate ideas, clarify thinking, and communicate.    
  • The student will use collaborative oral language skills in small group activities to clarify reading, and expand understanding of a literary work.

Reading

  • The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
  • The student will apply knowledge of appropriate reference materials.
  • The student will read and learn the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.

Writing

  • The student will write in a variety of forms, including narrative, expository, persuasive, practical, and creative 
  • The students will take notes from written oral and audio-visual material.
  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.
  • The student will credit the sources of both quoted and paraphrased ideas. 

Vocabulary

  • The student will give and seek information in conversations, in group discussions, and in oral presentations.
  • The student will write in a variety of forms, including narrative, expository, persuasive, and creative. 
  • The student will learn the meanings of unfamiliar words presented within cumulative word sets 

Grammar

  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.

Science

  • The student will plan and conduct investigations in which they
    • Identify a problem/question and propose a testable hypothesis based on direct observations and research of scientific literature    
    • Design a safe experiment with identifiable dependent and independent variables
    • Choose appropriate laboratory instruments to accurately measure quantitative data using metric units
    • Collect, record, analyze and report data using appropriate graphical representation and written explanation
    • Recognize and discuss sources of error inherent in experimental design
    • Construct, write and defend their conclusion while recognizing and analyzing alternative scientific explanations, and potential questions, raised by their findings
  • The student will investigate and understand that all living things are made up of cells and show patterns of cellular organization.  Key concepts include
    • Cell structure and function of organelles
    • Development of cell theory
    • Cell division (mitosis and meiosis)
    • Life functions and processes of cells, tissues, organs, and systems
  • The student will learn about the history of biological concepts. Key concepts in
    • Evidence supporting the cell theory
    • Scientific explanations of the development of organisms through time (biological evolution)
    • Evidence supporting the germ theory of infectious disease
    • Development of the structural model of DNA
    • History of collaborative efforts of scientists
  •  The student will investigate and understand relationships between cell structure and function. Key concepts include
    • Characteristics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
    • Exploring the diversity and variation of eukaryotes
    • Similarities between the processes of a single cell and a whole organism
    • The cell membrane model (diffusion, osmosis, and active transport)
  • The student will investigate and understand basis for modern classification systems. Key concepts include
    • Structural similarities among organisms
    • Comparison of developmental stages in different organisms
    • Examination of biochemical similarities and differences among organisms
  • The student will investigate and understand life functions of living organisms with an emphasis on humans. Key concepts include
    • How their structures and functions vary between and within the kingdoms
    • Comparison of their metabolic activities
    • Analyses of their responses to the environment
    • Maintenance of homeostasis
    • Human health issues, human anatomy, body systems, and life functions
    • Classification, and life cycle, of viruses
    • Dissection of fetal pig to compare and contrast relevant internal structure and function
  • The student will investigate and understand the basic physical and chemical processes of photosynthesis and its importance to plant and animal life. Key concepts include
    • Energy transfer between sunlight and chlorophyll
    • Transformation of water and carbon dioxide into sugar and oxygen
    • Photosynthesis as the foundation of virtually all food webs
  • The student will investigate and understand that organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations.  Key concepts include
    • The role of DNA
    • The function of genes and chromosomes
    • Genotypes and phenotypes
    • Factors affecting the expression of traits
  • The student will investigate and understand common mechanisms of inheritance and protein synthesis. Key concepts include
    • Cell growth and division
    • Gamete formation
    • Cell specialization
    • Prediction of inheritance of traits based on the Mendelian laws of heredity
    • Genetic variation                
    • The structure, function, and replication of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA)
    • Events involved in the construction of proteins
    • Use, limitations, and misuse of genetic information
    • Genetic engineering, its applications, and ethical questions raised by its use
  • The student will investigate and understand how populations change through time. Key concepts include
    • How genetic variation, reproductive strategies, and environmental pressures impact the survival of populations
    • The relationships of mutation, adaptation, natural selection, and extinction
    • How natural selection leads to adaptations
    • Emergence of new species
    • Scientific explanations for biological evolution
  • The student will investigate and understand dynamic equilibria within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  Key concepts include
    • Interactions within and among populations including carrying capacities, limiting factors, and growth curves
    • Nutrient cycling with energy flow through ecosystems
    • Succession patterns in ecosystems
    • Biodiversity
    • The effects of natural events and human activities on ecosystems with emphasis on the Chesapeake Bay


Math
Student will:

  • Explore the concept of algebraic expression
    • Use letters to represent unknown numbers
    • Write simple algebraic expressions
    • Evaluate expressions by substitution
  • Explore solid figures
    • Associate two-dimensional drawings with three-dimensional shape
    • Visualize pyramids, prisms, and cylinders from two-dimensional drawings
    • Identify nets of cubes, cuboids, prisms and pyramids
    • Identify the solid represented by a net
    • Determine whether a figure can be the net of a given solid
    • Determine whether a solid can be formed from a given net
  • Recall and apply previous knowledge of ratios to the following aspects
    • Compare quantities using ratios
    • Express a ratio in its simplest form
    • Relate ratios to units
    • Relate ratios to a fraction of a quantity
    • Relate proportion to ratios and fractions
  • Recall and apply previous knowledge of percentage to the following aspects
    • Express part of a whole as a fraction or as a percentage
    • Relate percentage to fractions and to decimals
    • Express one quantity as a percentage of another
    • Find the whole or a percentage part when given the value of a percentage part
  • Explore the concept of speed as ratio of distance and time
    • Interpret speed as distance traveled per unit of time
    • Read and write units of speed
    • Find average speed
    • Manipulate the formula for speed to isolate each component
  • Expand understanding of fractions
    • Practice mixed operations which involves all four operations and fractions with and without parenthesis
    • Solve multi-step problems involving fractions
  • Explore the characteristics of a circle
    • Identify and measure the radius and diameter of a circle
    • Recognize the relationship between diameter and circumference; find the circumference of a circle
    • Recognize the relationship between radius and area; find the area of a circle
    • Determine the perimeter and area of parts of a circle and composite figures
  • Explore graphs as a visual representation of data
    • Read and interpret circle graphs, using whole numbers, fractions and percents
    • Use given data to create a pie chart
  • Explore the concept of volume
    • Find the volume of cubes and cuboids
    • Manipulate the volume formula to isolate each component
  • Expand on the concept of volume
    • Find an unknown dimension when given other remaining dimensions
    • Convert the volume of a liquid
  • Expand understanding of triangles and other four sided figures
    • Recall and apply previous knowledge of angles, triangles and quadrilateral
    • Find unknown angles in problems involving triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Solve more challenging word problems involving
    • Whole numbers, decimals and fractions
    • Ratios and percentages
    • Speed

Social Studies

  • The student will improve skills in historical research and geographical analysis
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the status and impact of global trade on regional civilizations of the world after 1500 C.E.
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of scientific, political, economic, and religious changes during the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Latin American revolutions of the nineteenth century
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of political and philosophical developments in Europe during the nineteenth century
  • The student will develop skills for historical analysis by relating the past with its effects on the present and the future 
  • The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis
  • The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, art, or tables
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 C.E. in terms of its impact on Western civilization
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of social, economic, and political changes and cultural achievements in the late medieval period
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of developments leading to the Renaissance in Europe in terms of its impact on Western civilization
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Reformation in terms of its impact on Western civilization 
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the European Age of Exploration and Colonization into the Americas, Africa, and Asia
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the status and impact of global trade on regional civilizations of the world after 1500 C.E.
  • The student will develop skills for historical analysis by relating the past with its effects on the present and the future 
  • The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis
  • The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, art, or tables
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of early development of humankind from the Paleolithic Era to the Bronze Age
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient river valley civilizations, including those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and China and the civilizations of the Hebrews, Phoenicians, and Nubians
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the civilization of Persia by describing Persia, including Zoroastrianism and the development of an imperial bureaucracy
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Rome from the 8th century BCE to 500 CE in terms of its impact on Western civilization
  • The student will develop skills for historical analysis by relating the past with its effects on the present and the future 
  • The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis
  • The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, art, or tables

Music
In 7th Grade Music class students will:

  • Practice whole body, active listening when listening to and learning music
  • Listen to other musicians in the ensemble while playing and "locks in" accordingly 
  • Use effective practicing techniques, such as "chunking," slower tempo, repetition
  • Maintain steady beat while singing, moving, playing instruments
  • Reproduce simple melodies, including proper pitches and rhythmic patterns, by ear
  • Perform melodies, basslines, color parts and rhythm parts as a part of the ensemble
  • Perform simple poly-rhythms
  • Begin a comprehensive Music History Curriculum starting with Gregorian Chant- Baroque Periods
  • Attend a performance of the Washington Bach Consort of a Bach Cantata an organ Prelude

French
Listening

  • The student will follow directions in French.
  • The student will identify main ideas and pertinent details when listening to materials such as live and recorded conversations, brief lectures, short news videos and so forth.
  • The student will comprehend and reply appropriately to directives presented in more complex informational materials.

Speaking

  • The student will sustain oral exchanges in French, using familiar and reincorporated phrases and sentences.The student will contribute in oral exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames, and will describe a sequence of events in the past tense, using the near past and imperfect tenses.
  • The student will discuss a story and express opinions.
  • The student will discuss his/her daily routine and how he/she feels; be able to talk with a doctor about where one hurts or symptoms of sickness.
  • The student will communicate successfully in basic survival situations using correct stress and intonation patterns.
  • The student will express feelings, opinions, and hypotheses using subjunctive and conditional structures.

Reading

  • The student will read and understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate resources that introduce current material in familiar settings.
  • The student will read for main idea and pick out supporting details.
  • The student will read and comprehend articles in magazines, and online French news sites.
  • The student will read authentic and level-appropriate materials to learn about the French language and francophone culture(s) and respond to comprehension questions.

Writing

  • Students will work toward mastering their French writing skills emphasizing the importance of  grammar mechanics, and French cultures. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects.
  • Students will write sentences on a familiar topic in a shared blog.
  • Students will write short messages, letters, and compositions using present, past, and future.

Culture

  • The student will learn about French sports and vacation traditions.
  • The student will make connections between topics studied in other subject areas and those studied in French class, such as French impact during the American revolution, official language of the Olympic games, French influences in geographical areas in the US.
  • The student will  compare and contrast the French holidays and traditions with the American holidays and traditions.
  • The student will create a modern time fable like Jean de La Fontaine use to write.
  • The student will continue to familiarize themselves with the Francophone countries from all over the world.
  • The student will continue reading French comic books such as Astérix et Obélix and Boule et Bill..

National French Exam

  • The student will participate in Level 2 of the National French Exam.

Spanish
Listening

  • The student will follow directions in Spanish. 
  • The student will identify main ideas and pertinent details when listening to materials such as live and recorded conversations, brief lectures, short news videos and so forth. 
  • The student will comprehend and reply appropriately to directives presented in more complex informational materials.

Speaking

  • The student will sustain oral exchanges in Spanish, using familiar and reincorporated phrases and sentences. The student will contribute in oral exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames, and will describe a sequence of events in the past tense, using the near past and imperfect tenses. 
  • The student will discuss a story and express opinions. 
  • The student will discuss his/her daily routine and how he/she feels; be able to talk with a doctor about where one hurts or symptoms of sickness. 
  • The student will communicate successfully in basic survival situations using correct stress and intonation patterns. 
  • The student will express feelings, opinions, and hypotheses using subjunctive and conditional structures.

Reading

  • The student will read and understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate resources that introduce current material in familiar settings.
  • The student will read for main idea and pick out supporting details.
  • The student will read and comprehend articles in magazines, and online Spanish news sites.
  • The student will read authentic and level-appropriate materials to learn about the Spanish language and respond to comprehension questions.

Writing

  • Students will work toward mastering their Spanish writing skills emphasizing the importance of grammar mechanics. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictation, poetry and projects.
  • Students will write sentences on a familiar topic in a shared blog.
  • Students will write short messages, letters, and compositions using present, past, and future.

Culture

  • The student will learn about French sports and vacation traditions.
  • The student will compare and contrast the Spanish holidays and traditions with the American holidays and traditions.
  • The student will continue to familiarize themselves with Spanish speaking countries from all over the world.

National Spanish Exam

  • The student will participate in Level 2 of the National Spanish Exam.

Latin

  • The student will read with proper classical pronunciation and intonation. 
  • The student will read cultural and narrative passages based on vocabulary familiar to the student. 
  • The student will read dialog with correct vocal expression. 
  • The student will use guessing strategies and cognates to interpret unfamiliar vocabulary. 
  • The student will read words, phrases, sentences, and short passages and associate them with visual representations. 
  • The student will demonstrate reading comprehension by answering questions. 
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary and syntax. 
  • The student will acquire cultural information from ancillary reading passages in Latin.
  • The student will recognize and reproduce the sounds of Latin vowels, consonants, and diphthongs.
  • The student will engage in brief conversational exchanges correctly demonstrating an understanding of the situation.
  • The student will respond to questions using the correct grammar and pronunciation.
  • The student will spell accurately, correctly using the macron as needed.
  • The student will recognize grammatical difference in agreement.
  • The student will write simple guided compositions, using mastered vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures.
  • The student will write questions and answers in complete sentences using mastered knowledge of rules for agreement.
  • The student will connect information about the Latin language and Roman culture with concepts studied in other subject areas.
  • The student will relate content from other subject areas to topics discussed in Latin class.
  • The student will recognize the basic language patterns of Latin and their differences to the English language.
  • The student will recognize Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes that appear in English words.
  • The student will compare and contrast the sound systems of Latin and English.
  • The student will study the perspectives, practice and products of Roman culture.
  • The student will identify practices in Roman life.
  • The student will understand and locate the major geographical features of the classical world.
  • The student will identify important historical and legendary figures and events.
  • The student will create and correctly caption illustrations based on cultural material.
  • The student will examine the human effects of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

Art

  • Develop an introductory understanding of the vast multiple mediums and concepts within art.
  • Formulate a non-hierarchical view of media.   
  • Develop an understanding of the arts as a global conversation.
  • Develop an introductory understanding of modern art history and contemporary art aesthetic trends.  
  • Synthesize information given in a multiple ways to produce works of art.
  • Use the elements of art; line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space to express ideas, images, and emotions.
  • Develop ideas for works of art by conducting research and making preliminary sketches.
  • Demonstrate a proficiency for researching an artist or time period and producing a work of art conceptually and aesthetically similar.  
  • Demonstrate an understanding of symbolic meanings by incorporating symbols in a work of art.
  • Express ideas through artistic choices of media, techniques, and subject matter.
  • Use new technology to produce works of art and conduct research.
  • Use 3D media to create a site specific installation that is based on a conceptual idea.  
  • Develop a unique artistic voice through independent critical thinking and authentic artistic choice.

Speech and Drama
Speech Objectives
Listening

  • The student will demonstrate active listening by analyzing information, ideas and opinions to determine relevancy

Verbal Communication

  • The student will develop speaking techniques for effective presentations
  • The student will use figurative language purposefully in speaking situations
  • The student will develop and use advanced vocabulary related to a topic

Non-Verbal Communication

  • The student will identify the relationship between a speaker’s verbal and nonverbal messages

Discussion/Debate

  • The student will give and seek information in conversations and in group discussions
  • The student will support a position, acknowledging opposing viewpoints during whole class debate

Oral Presentations

  • The student will develop and deliver a formal presentation using appropriate organizational structure
  • The student will speak in a variety of situations to persuade and/or inspire

Broadcast Journalism

  • The student will create script for and deliver a variety of audio news reports
  • The student will demonstrate ability to add unscripted content to news reports with fluency
  • The student will research, write, and deliver a special news report on a selected topic

Analysis/Critical Response

  • The student will recognize and analyze persuasive techniques
  • The student will understand and use criteria from a rubric to evaluate and improve oral presentations
  • The student will provide constructive feedback to speakers concerning the coherence and logic of a speech’s content and delivery


Drama Objectives
Performance

  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by presenting a scripted scene with memorization
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills through control of movement, gestures, and placement on the stage
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills through appropriate use of vocal projection, inflection, and articulation during performance activities
  •  The student will communicate ideas through individual performances, group productions, or group projects to demonstrate teamwork, cooperation, and dependability
  • The student will work in a small group to rehearse and present a short scene

Technical Theatre

  • The student will recognize how the technical elements (lighting, sound, scenery, props, costumes) can effectively reinforce the elements of drama (plot, character, setting, dialogue, conflict)
  • The student will work collaboratively to select, create and use one technical element in a presentation to show environments and suggest characters.

Analysis/Criticism

  • The student will identify elements of plot, character, setting, dialogue, conflict
  • The student will understand the relative usefulness of various components when reading a script
  • The student will identify the beats, small divisions, in a scene
  • The student will identify how other art forms are applied in theatre
  • The student will write a critique of a live theatrical performance
  • The student will demonstrate appropriate performance behavior as a participant and/or audience member

Athletics
In 7th Grade PE class, students are developing the following skills:

  • Apply movement principles and concepts to correct specific sport and recreational skill performance in self and others. 
  • How to exhibit cooperative, respectful, safe behaviors in team sport settings. 
  • Team Sports include: soccer, cross country, volleyball, basketball, lacrosse, softball, and track and field.
Grade 8

Language Arts
Oral Language

  • The student will participate in and report on small-group learning activities. 

Reading Analysis

  • The student will read and analyze a variety of literature. 

Writing

  • The student will develop a variety of writing, with an emphasis on exposition. 
  • The students will take notes from written, oral and audio-visual material. 
  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing. 
  • The student will critique peer writing. 

Vocabulary

  • The student will learn the meanings of unfamiliar words presented within cumulative word sets. 

Grammar

  • The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.

Math - Geometry
Student will:

  • Explore the fundamental geometric terms
    • Identify, name and draw point, line, line segment, ray, plane, angles, and pairs of angles  
    • Apply definitions for geometric terms and angle relationships to solve problems
    • Apply formulas for perimeter, area and circumference of geometric shapes and composite figures
  • Develop the formulas for midpoint and distance in the coordinate plane
    • Apply midpoint and distance formulas to find the midpoint of a  line segment and distance between two points
    • Identify and apply transformations in the coordinate plane
  • Explore the concept of inductive and deductive
    • Use inductive reasoning to identify patterns and make conjectures
    • Find counterexamples to disprove conjectures
    • Use deductive reasoning to solve logic puzzles
  • Use theorems as justification when solving algebraic equations

  • Identify parallel, perpendicular and skew lines

  • Explore the relationship of angles formed by parallel lines and a transversal
    • Identify, draw and name angles and their relationships
    • Find the angle measures
  • Use theorems to prove two lines parallel and perpendicular

  • Explore concept of slope
    • Use the slope formula to find the slope of lines in a coordinate plane
    • Compare slopes to identify parallel and perpendicular lines
  • Explore lines in the coordinate plane
    • Graph lines and write their equations in slope-intercept and point-slope form
    • Classify lines as parallel, perpendicular or coinciding
  • Classify triangles according to side length and angle measure
    • Use the classification to find angle measure and side length
  • Discover relationship of the interior and exterior angles of a triangle
    • Find the measures of interior and exterior angles of triangles
  • Use properties of congruent triangles to prove triangles congruent
    • List the corresponding parts of congruent triangles
    • Write congruency statements
    • Apply Side-Side-Side (SSS), Side-Angle-Side (SAS), ASA, AAS and Hypotenuse-Leg to prove triangles congruent and to solve problems
  • Apply properties of isosceles and equilateral triangles to solve problems
  • Explore the concept of perpendicular bisectors and angle bisectors
    • Identify and draw bisector
    • Apply bisector theorems to find angle measures or segment lengths
    • Connect and apply perpendicular bisector theorem to lines in the coordinate plane
    • Write an equation in point slope form of the perpendicular bisector of a line in the coordinate plane
  • Explore special points, segments and lines in a triangle
    • Connect perpendicular bisectors and angle bisectors to triangles
      • Identify and locate circumcenter and incenter
      • Construct circumcenter and incenter
    • Apply properties of medians, altitudes and midsegments of a triangle
    • Identify and locate centroids, orthocenters and midsegment triangles
  • Explore the inequalities in one triangle and in two triangles and resulting theorems

  • Explore Pythagorean inequalities and other special right triangles
    • Use Pythagorean theorem to find side length of right triangles
    • Apply properties of special right triangles to solve problems
  • Explore the properties of polygons
    • Classify polygons based on sides and angles
    • Find and use the measures of interior and exterior angles of polygons
  • Discover the properties of special quadrilaterals
    • Apply and use properties of parallelograms to solve problems
    • Use conditions of parallelograms to prove given quadrilateral is a parallelogram
      • Explore properties of special parallelograms
      • Apply and use properties of rectangles, rhombuses and squares to solve problems
      • Use conditions of rectangles, rhombuses and squares to prove given quadrilateral is a rectangle, rhombus or square
    • Explore properties of kites and trapezoids
      • Use conditions of kites and trapezoids to solve problems
  • Explore similarity between given polygons
    • Recall ratio and proportion
      • Write and simplify ratios
      • Solve proportions
      • Use proportional relationships to make indirect measurements, including scale drawings
    • Recognize the difference between similar and congruent
    • Identify similar polygons
    • Use properties of similar polygons to solve problems
    • Use corresponding angles and sides to verify polygons are similar
  • Discover and prove similarity between two triangles
    • Use AA, SSS and SAS to solve problems
    • Use properties of similar triangles to solve problems
  • Expand similarity concept to right triangles
    • Use ratios and proportions to find missing side lengths in right triangles (including geometric mean)
    • Use trigonometric ratios to solve problems
      • Find the sine, cosine and tangent of an acute angle
      • Use trigonometric ratios to find side lengths and angle measures in right triangle
    • Use angle of depression and angle of elevation to solve problems
  • Explore area and perimeter of various figures
    • Develop the geometric formulas for circles, triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons
    • Apply the formulas to solve problems (including composite and irregular shapes)
    • Use Pythagorean theorem to find dimensions of figures
  • Explore area and perimeter of various figures in the coordinate plane (including irregular shapes)
  • Explore properties of three dimensional figures
    • Identify, name and draw representations of three-dimensional figures
    • Find the surface areas and volumes of three-dimensional figures
  • Explore properties of circles, lines and arcs of circles, angles and segments in circles
    • Apply the properties of tangents, secants, chords and arcs to solve problems
    • Find the area of sectors and arc length
    • Use properties of inscribed angles to solve problems
    • Use segments relationships and angle relationships within a circle to solve problems
    • Expand concept of circles to the coordinate plane
    • Write equations and graph circles in the coordinate plane


Math - Complexities of Algebra with an Introduction of Geometry
Student will:

  • Recall and apply knowledge of linear equations
    • Graphing a line
    • Writing an equation of line
    • Finding intercepts, slope and determining relationships between lines
  • Connect and apply their knowledge of linear equations to:
    • Use Pythagorean theorem to find length of a line
    • Use midpoint formula and distance formula to solve problems
  • Solve systems of linear equations by elimination, substitution and graphing
    • Inspect systems to determine efficient solution strategy
  • Use properties of exponents to simplify expressions
  • Express the square roots and cube roots of whole numbers and monomials in simplest radical form
  • Solve quadratic equations algebraically and graphically
    • Determine vertex and discriminant and apply information accordingly
  • Perform all four operations on polynomials
  • Factor expressions completely
  • Explore concept of rational expressions
    • Simplify rational expressions
    • Perform all four operations on rational expressions
  • Explore radical equations
    • Perform all four operations on radical expressions
    • Solve radical equations
  • Explore the fundamental geometric terms
    • Identify, name and draw point, line, line segment, ray, plane, angles, and pairs of angles
    • Apply definitions for geometric terms and angle relationships to solve problems
  • Apply formulas for perimeter, area and circumference of geometric shapes and composite figures
  • Develop the formulas for midpoint and distance in the coordinate plane
    • Apply midpoint and distance formulas to find the midpoint of a  line segment and distance between two points
  • Identify and apply transformations in the coordinate plane
  • Explore the concept of inductive and deductive
    • Use inductive reasoning to identify patterns and make conjectures
    • Find counterexamples to disprove conjectures
    • Use deductive reasoning to solve logic puzzles
  • Use theorems as justification when solving algebraic equations
  • Identify parallel, perpendicular and skew lines
  • Explore the relationship of angles formed by parallel lines and a transversal
    • Identify, draw and name angles and their relationships
    • Find the angle measures
    • Prove two lines parallel and perpendicular using theorems
  • Expand their knowledge of lines in the coordinate plane
    • Use the slope formula to compare slopes to identify parallel and perpendicular lines
    • Graph lines and write their equations in slope-intercept and point-slope form
    • Classify lines as parallel, perpendicular or coinciding by inspecting equations
  • Explore characteristics of various types of triangles
    • Classify triangles according to side length and angle measure
    • Use the classification to find angle measure and side length
    • Discover relationship of the interior and exterior angles of a triangle
    • Find the measures of interior and exterior angles of triangles

Science

  • The student will plan and conduct investigations in which they
    • Identify a problem/question and propose a testable hypothesis based on direct observations and research of scientific literature
    • Design an experiment that has identifiable dependent and independent variables, constants, controls, and uses repeated trials
    • Safely use chemicals and glassware                
    • Choose appropriate laboratory instruments to accurately measure quantitative data using metric units
    • Collect, record, analyze and report data using appropriate graphical representation and written explanation
    • Recognize and discuss sources of error inherent in experimental design
    • Construct, write and defend their conclusion while recognizing and analyzing alternative scientific explanations, and potential questions, raised by their findings
  • The student will investigate and understand the basic nature of matter.  Key concepts include
    • The particle theory of matter
    • Historical and modern models of atomic structure and the scientists that contributed to our understanding of the atom
    • Distinction between elements, compounds, mixtures, acids, bases, and salts
    • Characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases
    • Characteristics of matter based on physical (shape, density, solubility, odor, melting point, boiling point, color) and chemical properties (acidity, basicity, combustibility, reactivity)
    • Law of Conservation of Matter and Energy
    • Types and components of chemical and physical changes
    • Nuclear reactions (products of fusion and fission and the effect of these products on humans and the environment)
  • The student will investigate and understand the organization and use of the periodic table of elements to obtain information.  Key concepts include
    • Symbols, atomic number, atomic mass, charge of subatomic particles
    • Classification of elements as metals, metalloids, and nonmetals
    • Isotopes, half -life, and radioactive decay
    • Chemical families (groups), series and periods
    • Trends including atomic radii, electro-negativity, shielding effect, and ionization energy
    • Electronic configurations, valence electrons, and oxidation numbers
  • The student will investigate and understand how conservation of energy and matter is expressed in chemical formulas and balanced equations. Key concepts include
    • Nomenclature
    • Writing chemical formulas and balancing chemical equations
    • Bonding types (ionic and covalent)
    • Reaction types (synthesis, decomposition, single and double replacement, oxidation-reduction, neutralization, exothermic, and endothermic)
    • Effect of catalysts on reaction rates
  • The student will investigate and understand states and forms of energy and how energy is transferred and transformed. Key concepts include
    • Potential and kinetic energy
    • Mechanical, chemical, and electrical energy
    • Heat, light, and sound
    • Transformation of energy among forms including mechanical, thermal, electrical, gravitational, chemical, and nuclear
    • Efficiency of systems
  • The student will investigate and understand the interrelationships among  mass, distance, force, and time through mathematical and experimental processes and technological applications of work, force and motion.  Key concepts include
    • Types of motion (linear, uniform circular, projectile, and planetary)
    • Newton’s laws of motion
    • Gravitation
    • Work, power, and energy
  • The student will investigate and understand temperature scales, heat, and heat transfer. Key concepts include
    • Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales and absolute zero
    • Phase change, freezing point, melting point, boiling point, vaporization, and condensation
    • Conduction, convection, and radiation
    • Applications of heat transfer (heat engines, thermostats, refrigeration, and heat pumps)
  • The student will investigate and understand that different frequencies and wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum are phenomena ranging from radio waves through visible light to gamma radiation. Key concepts include
    • The properties and behaviors of radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays
    • Wavelength, frequency, speed, resonance, and amplitude of sound
    • The nature of mechanical waves
    • Echolocation and technological applications of sound
    • The wave behavior of light and the application of the laws of reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference
    • Wave characteristics (period, wavelength, frequency, amplitude, and phase)
    • Fundamental wave processes (reflection, refraction, diffraction,  interference, polarization, Doppler Effect)
    • Light and sound in terms of wave models
  • The student will investigate and understand basic principles of electricity and magnetism. Key concepts include
    • Static electricity, current electricity, and circuits
    • Ohm’s law
    • Magnetic fields and electromagnets


Social Studies

  • The student will demonstrate skills for historical and geographical analysis and responsible citizenship
  • The student will demonstrate mastery of the social studies skills responsible citizenship requires
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the major events from the last decade of the eighteenth century through the first half of the nineteenth century
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction Era and their importance as major turning points in American history 
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the issues involved in the creation and ratification of the Constitution of the United States and how the principles of limited government, consent of the governed, and the social contract are embodied in it
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the federal system described in the Constitution of the United States
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers of the national government 
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of the operation of the federal judiciary
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of civil liberties and civil rights

French
Listening

  • The student will follow directions in French.
  • The student will identify main ideas and pertinent details when listening to materials such as live and recorded conversations, brief lectures, short news videos and so forth.
  • The student will comprehend and reply appropriately to directives presented in more complex informational materials.

Speaking

  • The student will sustain oral exchanges in French, using familiar and reincorporated phrases and sentences.
  • The student will contribute in oral exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames, and will describe a sequence of events in the past tense, using the near past and imperfect tenses.
  • The student will discuss a story and express opinions.
  • The student will discuss his/her daily routine and how he/she feels; be able to talk with a doctor about where one hurts or symptoms of sickness.
  • The student will communicate successfully in basic survival situations using correct stress and intonation patterns.
  • The student will express feelings, opinions, and hypotheses using subjunctive and conditional structures.

Reading

  • The student will read and understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate resources that introduce current material in familiar settings.
  • The student will read for main idea and pick out supporting details.
  • The student will read and comprehend articles in magazines, and online French news sites.
  • The student will read authentic and level-appropriate materials to learn about the French language and francophone culture(s) and respond to comprehension questions. 

Writing

  • Students will work toward mastering their French writing skills emphasizing the importance of  grammar mechanics, and French cultures. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictées, poetry and projects.
  • Students will write sentences on a familiar topic in a shared blog.
  • Students will write short messages, letters, and compositions using present, past, and future. 

Culture

  • The student will learn about French sports and vacation traditions.
  • The student will make connections between topics studied in other subject areas and those studied in French class, such as French impact during the American revolution, official language of the Olympic games, French influences in geographical areas in the US.
  • The student will  compare and contrast the French holidays and traditions with the American holidays and traditions.
  • The student will create a modern time fable like Jean de La Fontaine use to write.
  • The student will continue to familiarize themselves with the Francophone countries from all over the world.
  • The student will continue reading French comic books such as Astérix et Obélix and Boule et Bill.

National French Exam

  • The student will participate in Level 2 of the National French Exam.

Spanish
Listening

  • The student will follow directions in Spanish.
  • The student will identify main ideas and pertinent details when listening to materials such as live and recorded conversations, brief lectures, short news videos and so forth.
  • The student will comprehend and reply appropriately to directives presented in more complex informational materials.

Speaking

  • The student will sustain oral exchanges in Spanish, using familiar and reincorporated phrases and sentences. 
  • The student will contribute in oral exchanges that reflect present, past, and future time frames, and will describe a sequence of events in the past tense, using the near past and imperfect tenses. 
  • The student will discuss a story and express opinions. 
  • The student will discuss his/her daily routine and how he/she feels; be able to talk with a doctor about where one hurts or symptoms of sickness. 
  • The student will communicate successfully in basic survival situations using correct stress and intonation patterns. 
  • The student will express feelings, opinions, and hypotheses using subjunctive and conditional structures.

Reading

  • The student will read and understand culturally authentic, level-appropriate resources that introduce current material in familiar settings. 
  • The student will read for main idea and pick out supporting details. 
  • The student will read and comprehend articles in magazines, and online French news sites. 
  • The student will read authentic and level-appropriate materials to learn about the French language and francophone culture(s) and respond to comprehension questions.

Writing

  • Students will work toward mastering their Spanish writing skills emphasizing the importance of grammar mechanics. This will be demonstrated through a variety of assessments, including readings, essays, dictations, poetry and projects. 
  • Students will write sentences on a familiar topic in a shared blog. 
  • Students will write short messages, letters, and compositions using present, past, and future.Culture. 
  • The student will learn about French sports and vacation traditions. 
  • The student will compare and contrast the French holidays and traditions with the American holidays and traditions. 
  • The student will continue to familiarize themselves with the Spanish speaking countries from all over the world.

National Spanish Exam

  • The student will participate in Level 2 of the National Spanish Exam.

Latin

  • The student will read with proper classical pronunciation and intonation.
  • The student will read cultural and narrative passages based on vocabulary familiar to the student.
  • The student will read dialog with correct vocal expression.
  • The student will use guessing strategies and cognates to interpret unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • The student will read words, phrases, sentences, and short passages and associate them with visual representations. 
  • The student will demonstrate reading comprehension by answering questions. 
  • The student will demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary and syntax. 
  • The student will acquire cultural information from ancillary reading passages in Latin. 
  • The student will recognize and reproduce the sounds of Latin vowels, consonants, and diphthongs. 
  • The student will engage in brief conversational exchanges correctly demonstrating an understanding of the situation. 
  • The student will respond to questions using the correct grammar and pronunciation. 
  • The student will spell accurately, correctly using the macron as needed. 
  • The student will recognize grammatical difference in agreement. 
  • The student will write simple guided compositions, using mastered vocabulary, expressions, and grammar structures. 
  • The student will write questions and answers in complete sentences using mastered knowledge of rules for agreement 
  • The student will connect information about the Latin language and Roman culture with concepts studied in other subject areas. 
  • The student will relate content from other subject areas to topics discussed in Latin class. 
  • The student will recognize the basic language patterns of Latin and their differences to the English language. 
  • The student will recognize Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes that appear in English words. 
  • The student will compare and contrast the sound systems of Latin and English. 
  • The student will study the perspectives, practice and products of Roman culture. 
  • The student will identify practices in Roman life. 
  • The student will understand and locate the major geographical features of the classical world. 
  • The student will identify important historical and legendary figures and events. 
  • The student will create and correctly caption illustrations based on cultural material. 
  • The student will study the perspectives, practice, and products of Roman culture during the Roman Empire and Roman colonization in 
  •    Britain and make comparisons. 
  • The student will identify practices in Roman life in the ancient Egyptian city of Alexandria. 
  • The student will participate in Level I of the National Latin Exam.


Music
In Grade 8 Music class the students will:

  • Practice whole body, active listening when listening to and learning music
  • Listen to other musicians in the ensemble while playing and "locks in" accordingly
  • Use effective practicing techniques, such as "chunking," slower tempo, repetition
  • Maintain steady beat while singing, moving, playing instruments
  • Reproduce simple melodies, including proper pitches and rhythmic patterns, by ear
  • Perform melodies, basslines, color parts and rhythm parts as a part of the ensemble
  • Perform simple poly-rhythms
  • Compose simple, original melodies on a variety of instruments
  • Compose original music comprised of multiple parts including melody, bassline, rhythm
  • Complete a Comprehensive Music History Curriculum- Baroque to Modern Day Music
  • Attend a performance by the Washington Bach Consort- Bach cantata and organ prelude

Art 

  • Develop an introductory understanding of the vast multiple mediums and concepts within art.
  • Formulate a non-hierarchical view of media.   
  • Develop an understanding of the arts as a global conversation.
  • Develop an introductory understanding of modern art history and contemporary art aesthetic trends.  
  • Synthesize information given in a multiple ways to produce works of art.
  • Use the elements of art; line, shape, form, color, value, texture, and space to express ideas, images, and emotions.
  • Develop ideas for works of art by conducting research and making preliminary sketches.
  • Demonstrate a proficiency for researching an artist or time period and producing a work of art conceptually and aesthetically similar.  
  • Demonstrate an understanding of symbolic meanings by incorporating symbols in a work of art.
  • Express ideas through artistic choices of media, techniques, and subject matter.
  • Use new technology to produce works of art and conduct research.
  • Use found 3D media to create a sculpture that shift identity and is based on a concept.  
  • Develop a unique artistic voice through independent critical thinking and authentic artistic choice.

Speech and Drama
Listening

  •  The student will ask probing questions to elicit information, including evidence to support the speaker’s claims and conclusions

Verbal Communication

  • The student will use speaking techniques for effective presentations and in impromptu speech
  • The student will incorporate varied sentence structure and correct grammar
  • The student will paraphrase, illustrate, clarify, and/or expand on a topic or idea

Non-Verbal Communication

  • The student will use visual aids, media, and/or technology to support verbal communication

Discussion/Debate

  • The student will present ideas spontaneously and appropriately in response to a topic or other speakers
  • The student will demonstrate effective debate skills and strategies in formal debate on a chosen topic

Oral Presentations

  •  The student will develop and deliver a formal presentation using appropriate organizational structure
  •  The student will speak in a variety of situations for special purposes

Broadcast Journalism

  • The student will create script for and film an unbiased video news report
  •  The student will use interviewing techniques to gain information
  • The student will conduct a live interview as part of a special news report
  •  The student will collaborate with classmates to create an effective Public Service Announcement video on a chosen topic

Analysis/Critical Response

  • The student will describe and analyze persuasive techniques and credibility in mass media messages
  • The student will understand and use criteria from a rubric to evaluate and improve oral presentations
  • The student will provide constructive feedback to speakers concerning stylistic devices and credibility

Performance

  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by presenting a memorized monologue
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills through movement and gestures using motivation for a specific character in a scene or a play
  • The student will demonstrate acting skills by using control of vocal projection, inflection and articulation to define a character
  • The student will use character analysis to enhance performance of a selected character 
  • The student will demonstrate respect for others and work collaboratively for a unified production 
  • The student will work collaboratively to select, cast, rehearse, and present a portion of a scripted play 

Technical Theatre

  • The student will analyze a script and make design choices about the following technical elements: lighting, scenery, costumes, props, and sound to show environments and/or suggest character

Analysis/Criticism

  • The student will demonstrate an understanding of the elements of plot, character, setting, dialogue, conflict, mood, and theme through script analysis and performance
  • The student will define aesthetics and discuss how it is reflected in theatre arts and everyday life
  • The student will use personal experience to respond to a character in a script
  • The student will read scripts and respond in oral, written, or visual form
  • The student will demonstrate appropriate performance behavior as a participant and/or audience member

Athletics
8th Grade students focus on developing the following skills:

  • Apply movement principles and concepts to correct specific sport and recreational skill performance in self and others. 
  • How to exhibit cooperative, respectful, safe behaviors in team sport settings. 
  • Team Sports include: soccer, cross country, volleyball, basketball, lacrosse, softball, and track and field.